Jump to content

Hundreds of Cameras are going up in downtown


LarryDallas

Recommended Posts

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7310659.html

The red light camera issue was nothing compared to this. Most people I know don't even know about the downtown cameras that already number in many and will soon number in many many more.

How soon before they put a camera in your house and your car so they can "help you" if you are in trouble?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7310659.html

The red light camera issue was nothing compared to this. Most people I know don't even know about the downtown cameras that already number in many and will soon number in many many more.

How soon before they put a camera in your house and your car so they can "help you" if you are in trouble?

They stated what they are for...They are not putting them in neighborhoods. People need to quit being paranoid. 1 in 6 billon i doubt anyone sits and watches one person move from one area to another.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a sort of kiosk in the 2300 block of Grant Street (behind Auto Zone) which contains security cameras.

Weren't those in response to the huge burglary increase in EMCA area over the past 7 months?--also That part of grant street was plagued by vandalism for a while-the guy who worked at la mexicana was assaulted and robbed there- isn't that where the fire across the street occured a few years ago?

for a while there (2008--or there abouts) was intense conversation/discussion at the HCID#6 about installing security cameras on lamposts in the East Montrose Management District----what height they would need to be, what angle etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure why everyone freaks out about "big gubmant" cameras in public spaces. London has them everywhere and it never bothered me. It actually made me feel happy knowing that if I were mugged, they'd have a nice clear picture of the assailant. I think this program is excellent news and I'd love to see it expanded into my neighborhood. Why should we pay a ton of $$ for extra police to randomly patrol streets when we can have an entire area monitored by less staff... and dispatch officers to crimes in progress?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

About two years ago the mayor of Chicago bragged about having 3,000 police cameras installed around the city, and plans to double that number within two years.

Shortly after that, Chicago went through a crime wave. So far this year there have been over 400 murders in that city. Cameras won't bring those people back to life.

Would crime have been worse if the cameras weren't there? No one can really say.

Would crime have been reduced if the millions spent on the new OEMC was spent on beat cops? No one can really say.

I like the idea of fighting crime with technology, but I'm not yet convinced that it works in this form.

When NBC News asked Chicago for examples of how the cameras had prevented crime, the best thing the city offered a videotape of a police camera watching a burglar crawling into a person's window who was arrested a short time later.

It should be noted that there have been cases of camera operators being disciplined for looking in people's windows watching things they shouldn't. As long as there are people running the cameras, they will (through malice, carelessness, poor training, or pure voyeurism) be used for purposes they were not intended, nor authorized. So who watches the watchers?

Some of the advanced cameras are equipped with microphones that can triangulate the location of a gunshot and swing the camera in that direction. In theory it should be possible for the camera to lock on to and track the shooter. I don't know that this has ever actually happened, though. I would think that if it had, the city would have splashed the video all over the news for everyone to see as an example of the success of the 6,000 camera program.

London is hardly an example of security cameras being used for good things. No one is sure how many cameras there are there, but there are estimates that it's in the hundreds of thousands. Yet 80% of London's street crimes are unsolved. Here's a BBC article indicating that it takes 1,000 cameras to solve one crime.

And just for fun -- a look at the camera network surrounding George Orwell's home: http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23391081-george-orwell-big-brother-is-watching-your-house.do

I'm not convinced that this wave of municipal security camera buying is fueled by anything more than mild paranoia and very good CCTV salesmen.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

London has them everywhere and it never bothered me. It actually made me feel happy knowing that if I were mugged, they'd have a nice clear picture of the assailant.

That's good if it makes you feel good, but statistics show that they're not going to catch the perp, no matter how many cameras are watching him mug you.

Why should we pay a ton of $$ for extra police to randomly patrol streets when we can have an entire area monitored by less staff... and dispatch officers to crimes in progress?

Police don't randomly patrol. There are very sophisticated computer programs that combined with community input create effective patrol patterns. I've seen them used in a couple of cities and they work well, until funding for the beat cops gets cut. Beat cops don't just wander aimlessly around the neighborhood like big blue Roombas.

I'd rather see more cops on the street than in their cars, or watching security monitors. Cops walking a neighborhood get to know the people who live there, what things should look like and shouldn't, and can detect very early on when something is amiss. Anyone who's ever walked more than a couple of blocks in their life knows that you see a lot more of what's going on around you when you walk compared with when you're in a car. Anyone who walks around their house or their block on a regular basis can tell when something is amiss. The additional visibility of a uniformed officer also acts as a deterrent to petty criminals.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

About two years ago the mayor of Chicago bragged about having 3,000 police cameras installed around the city, and plans to double that number within two years.

Shortly after that, Chicago went through a crime wave. So far this year there have been over 400 murders in that city. Cameras won't bring those people back to life.

Would crime have been worse if the cameras weren't there? No one can really say.

Would crime have been reduced if the millions spent on the new OEMC was spent on beat cops? No one can really say.

I like the idea of fighting crime with technology, but I'm not yet convinced that it works in this form.

When NBC News asked Chicago for examples of how the cameras had prevented crime, the best thing the city offered a videotape of a police camera watching a burglar crawling into a person's window who was arrested a short time later.

It should be noted that there have been cases of camera operators being disciplined for looking in people's windows watching things they shouldn't. As long as there are people running the cameras, they will (through malice, carelessness, poor training, or pure voyeurism) be used for purposes they were not intended, nor authorized. So who watches the watchers?

Some of the advanced cameras are equipped with microphones that can triangulate the location of a gunshot and swing the camera in that direction. In theory it should be possible for the camera to lock on to and track the shooter. I don't know that this has ever actually happened, though. I would think that if it had, the city would have splashed the video all over the news for everyone to see as an example of the success of the 6,000 camera program.

London is hardly an example of security cameras being used for good things. No one is sure how many cameras there are there, but there are estimates that it's in the hundreds of thousands. Yet 80% of London's street crimes are unsolved. Here's a BBC article indicating that it takes 1,000 cameras to solve one crime.

And just for fun -- a look at the camera network surrounding George Orwell's home: http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23391081-george-orwell-big-brother-is-watching-your-house.do

I'm not convinced that this wave of municipal security camera buying is fueled by anything more than mild paranoia and very good CCTV salesmen.

That Orwell link is kinda spooky. Thanks for the insight/info above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's good if it makes you feel good, but statistics show that they're not going to catch the perp, no matter how many cameras are watching him mug you.

Police don't randomly patrol. There are very sophisticated computer programs that combined with community input create effective patrol patterns. I've seen them used in a couple of cities and they work well, until funding for the beat cops gets cut. Beat cops don't just wander aimlessly around the neighborhood like big blue Roombas.

I'd rather see more cops on the street than in their cars, or watching security monitors. Cops walking a neighborhood get to know the people who live there, what things should look like and shouldn't, and can detect very early on when something is amiss. Anyone who's ever walked more than a couple of blocks in their life knows that you see a lot more of what's going on around you when you walk compared with when you're in a car. Anyone who walks around their house or their block on a regular basis can tell when something is amiss. The additional visibility of a uniformed officer also acts as a deterrent to petty criminals.

Sadly, in most cities, police do randomly patrol, at least when they are not running from house to house taking reports of crimes already committed. Only in the last few years has HPD been able to both invest in the software capable of identifying "hotspots", as well as hire enough personnel to input the data needed to make the software work. They have a saturation squad that hits the hotspots, arresting drug users and dealers, as statistics show that an overwhelming number of burglaries and thefts are committed by drug users looking for enough money to buy their fix...at least they were. One of the tactics used involved arresting users found with crackpipes or meth pipes containing residual amounts of cocaine or meth, as any amount of these drugs is illegal. However, the District Attorney's Office announced that they would no longer accept so called "trace cases", as they were clogging the court dockets. While I am confident that HPD's saturation squad still operates, I do not know what effect the DA's policy has had on its effectiveness.

Video can be very useful when it provides a clear enough picture to identify the perpetrator. But, someone must retrieve the video, or else it is of no use whatsoever. In this sense, it is no better than the detective who looks (or doesn't look) for it. London studies seem to suggest that the criminals are undeterred by their camera system, likely because they've found that the cameras do not result in actual ARRESTS and CONVICTIONS. When this occurs, the cameras will begin to deter crime. Until then, they are akin to a hood ornament.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've had these in downtown Dallas for a few years, and they have been effective in controlling crime. There are currently 115 police cameras throughout the city.

http://www.wfaa.com/news/crime/Downtown-Dallas-cameras-capture-crimes-accidents-107710798.html

"Dallas' cameras led to more than 1,142 arrests in 2008. Last year, the figure rose to 1,536 arrests. During the first ten months of 2010, the cameras have helped capture 2,290 people breaking the law."

Edited by dfwcre8tive
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...