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poyea

Land on Yale, just south of I-10

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HAIFers...does anyone have any knowledge of what is happening on the land on Yale, just south of I-10 (either side of Yale actually). There has recently been quite a bit of earth movers chopping up the concrete on the west side of Yale. The For Sale signs are still in place however. We were hoping for a new HEB location, but with Montrose getting one, we're not as hopeful anymore. HAIFers just HAVE to know something by now.

Thanks!!!

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Don't count on HEB.

Why not?

(BTW, I ask not in the 'pithy-and-smart@ssy' way, but in the 'please-share-some-info-with-us' way).

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Why not?

(BTW, I ask not in the 'pithy-and-smart@ssy' way, but in the 'please-share-some-info-with-us' way).

My fear is that if HEB doesn't build on this site, Home Depot will. Imagine how the migrant worker population will multiply if that's the case. I don't know how those guys can just hang out at Ace hardware in the middle of summer like that.

With the I-10 feeder road already beginning and the prevalence of remodels in the Heights/Washington area, this would probably fit HD's profile to a T.

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With the I-10 feeder road already beginning and the prevalence of remodels in the Heights/Washington area, this would probably fit HD's profile to a T.

Home Depot has a store along the North Loop to serve remodels in the greater Heights area, Garden Oaks, and Oak Forest. Washington Avenue isn't such a hot remodel market.

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My fear is that if HEB doesn't build on this site, Home Depot will. Imagine how the migrant worker population will multiply if that's the case. I don't know how those guys can just hang out at Ace hardware in the middle of summer like that.

With the I-10 feeder road already beginning and the prevalence of remodels in the Heights/Washington area, this would probably fit HD's profile to a T.

Good point. And that fits in nicely with Home Depot's policy of building new stores only two and a half miles from their existing ones. :blink:

(Actually, my real fear is that you typed your post in all seriousness.)

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Good point. And that fits in nicely with Home Depot's policy of building new stores only two and a half miles from their existing ones. blink.gif

Well, if not a Home Depot, I'm keeping my fingers crossed it's something that will help to multiply the migrant worker population just hanging out in the middle of summer.

Please Lord, let it be a Tecate brewery.

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What are you folks talking about?? Do some of the Home Depots have a "summer only" concession?

I want that at our store too!! (stomps foot)

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Well, if not a Home Depot, I'm keeping my fingers crossed it's something that will help to multiply the migrant worker population just hanging out in the middle of summer.

Please Lord, let it be a Tecate brewery.

Maybe they'll build a big Greyhound bus station and redirect traffic from the downtown station to the Heights area. That way we can have recently released criminals rather than those rascally people who want to work.

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The For Sale signs are still in place however.

I think there are a couple of lots for sale on that west side of the street. When I drove by yesterday, i don't think i saw a for sale sign on the section where they are clearing things up. ... But I may have missed it.

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Crews were painting the Yale railroad underpass yesterday. The bright colors look great and it reminds me how nice infrastructure can be when just a little more than the bare minimum is done. Thanks whoever paid for this project.

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Crews were painting the Yale railroad underpass yesterday. The bright colors look great and it reminds me how nice infrastructure can be when just a little more than the bare minimum is done. Thanks whoever paid for this project.

The paint really does look nice. I wish they did that in more areas.

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Hope they use the land off Yale & Koehler wisely (it is in a unique loaction, especially with it now getting access to I-10). Would be great if a City Center development was completed (including a LifeTime Fitness, parking garage, restuarants, etc. )

Am hoping they do not build 2-3 bedroom townhouses in that location as then there would be too many of them in the area. That being said if a Caceras type of development (http://www.caceresliving.com/index.php) came up there it will be neat. The Spanish architecture really stands out. A lot happening in the area, especially with the Whole Foods construction of Waugh and Dallas having started. Hope the area develops as a whole; only time will tell!!!

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Hope they use the land off Yale & Koehler wisely (it is in a unique loaction, especially with it now getting access to I-10). Would be great if a City Center development was completed (including a LifeTime Fitness, parking garage, restuarants, etc. )

Am hoping they do not build 2-3 bedroom townhouses in that location as then there would be too many of them in the area. That being said if a Caceras type of development (http://www.caceresliving.com/index.php) came up there it will be neat. The Spanish architecture really stands out. A lot happening in the area, especially with the Whole Foods construction of Waugh and Dallas having started. Hope the area develops as a whole; only time will tell!!!

Not only are the NOT putting in an HEB (and I heard from an EXTREMELY reliable source it was a done deal) Wal-Mart has pulled another fast one and is invading the Heights! That's right, you heard it here first, Wal-Mart, who I have heard has THE HIGHEST PARKING LOT CRIME RATE will be building on that property. Seems that HEB made an offer to the land owner, who then went to Wal-Mart asking them to beat the price. The land-owner sold us out folks! Anyone interested in launching a full-blown boycott/property owner protest?

And you guys were worried about the Nicholson Street Hike and Bike trail bringing crime to the area....

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Not only are the NOT putting in an HEB (and I heard from an EXTREMELY reliable source it was a done deal) Wal-Mart has pulled another fast one and is invading the Heights! That's right, you heard it here first, Wal-Mart, who I have heard has THE HIGHEST PARKING LOT CRIME RATE will be building on that property. Seems that HEB made an offer to the land owner, who then went to Wal-Mart asking them to beat the price. The land-owner sold us out folks! Anyone interested in launching a full-blown boycott/property owner protest?

And you guys were worried about the Nicholson Street Hike and Bike trail bringing crime to the area....

Don't you think the Wal-Mart high parking lot crime rate is more due to where they stick most Wal-Marts rather than the store itself?

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Don't you think the Wal-Mart high parking lot crime rate is more due to where they stick most Wal-Marts rather than the store itself?

Not necessarily. It's probably because of the size of the parking lots and WalMart's apparent lack of interest in protecting their clientele. They seem to have an attitude of doing whatever it takes to keep their profits high, which means cookie cutter buildings on cookie cutter parking lots with no security measures fine-tuned to the local community. I will say this. When H-E-B built their location out on Bunker Hill, which has a gi-normous lot, they had problems early on with car break ins. I remember seeing it on the news. As soon as it started happening, they hired local law enforcement to patrol on their off-time, as well as bringing in their own security teams to patrol on golf carts and seg-ways (I have no idea how that brand name is spelled, my apologies.) All those security measures are still in place a year later, which is why I have no problem going there at all hours. WalMart? Oh-hell-to-the-no!

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Not necessarily. It's probably because of the size of the parking lots and WalMart's apparent lack of interest in protecting their clientele. They seem to have an attitude of doing whatever it takes to keep their profits high, which means cookie cutter buildings on cookie cutter parking lots with no security measures fine-tuned to the local community. I will say this. When H-E-B built their location out on Bunker Hill, which has a gi-normous lot, they had problems early on with car break ins. I remember seeing it on the news. As soon as it started happening, they hired local law enforcement to patrol on their off-time, as well as bringing in their own security teams to patrol on golf carts and seg-ways (I have no idea how that brand name is spelled, my apologies.) All those security measures are still in place a year later, which is why I have no problem going there at all hours. WalMart? Oh-hell-to-the-no!

I go to Wal-Mart location on S. Post Oak most frequently and usually between about 10:00 PM and 3:00 AM. There are lots of black people around (maybe that's what you're referring to) but I've never felt threatened.

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I used to work nights and did most of my shopping after I got off work. A lot of that shopping was done at 24 hour Walmarts. Not once did I ever go to a Walmart that did not have security patrolling the parking lot. And, that's even without the bad press that caused HEB to put security in their lot.

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There are lots of black people around (maybe that's what you're referring to) but I've never felt threatened.

You have GOT to be kidding me. Of course you are the same guy who in another post on this same topic mentioned something along the lines of what a blessing it would be to the low-income Mexican families who load generations of their family in to a car for a Wal-Mart day trip. It's not a race issue. Leave it at that.

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I used to work nights and did most of my shopping after I got off work. A lot of that shopping was done at 24 hour Walmarts. Not once did I ever go to a Walmart that did not have security patrolling the parking lot. And, that's even without the bad press that caused HEB to put security in their lot.

I don't know, Red. I'm a tough little broad, but I still feel on edge when I have gone to some of the local WalMarts. I just get a bad vibe off of them.

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My wife is pumped about the possibility of not driving up 290 to Hollister. I love the cheapness, but I hate lines and crowds so I let her do that whenever possible.

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I don't know, Red. I'm a tough little broad, but I still feel on edge when I have gone to some of the local WalMarts. I just get a bad vibe off of them.

You are certainly entitled to be fearful whenever and wherever you see fit, but that doesn't obligate the tens of millions of us who've shopped at Walmart to believe it rational. For proof, not the previous poster who sends his wife to the Walmart at 290 and Hollister unescorted.

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You have GOT to be kidding me. Of course you are the same guy who in another post on this same topic mentioned something along the lines of what a blessing it would be to the low-income Mexican families who load generations of their family in to a car for a Wal-Mart day trip. It's not a race issue. Leave it at that.

Well hey, let's be honest with ourselves. Bad people are going to do bad things whether they congregate at a Wal-Mart, the Sawyer Sports Bar, a Mexican beer bar, the Reagan High School, or wherever else. If it isn't a race thing (which is suggested by statements like "I just get a bad vibe off of them"), then it's a class thing. Whatever the case, you need to accept that the perceived safety of any given Wal-Mart in the Houston region is going to be more influenced by the neighborhoods it serves than it is itself capable of influencing those neighborhoods. And if it makes you uncomfortable, perhaps its just because you're reminded of the people that are (for the time being) your neighbors.

Edited by TheNiche

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I don't know, Red. I'm a tough little broad, but I still feel on edge when I have gone to some of the local WalMarts. I just get a bad vibe off of them.

If you feel that strongly about it, then by all means don't go to one. Look at my sig, I just don't go to them whenever possible.

My only beef right now is that I'm some of the more rural parts of MN and WI, is that I see local stores not being able to supply stuff that I need on the road and have to either do without or go feel guilty when I walk into one.

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If it isn't a race thing (which is suggested by statements like "I just get a bad vibe off of them"), then it's a class thing.

Nope, it's just that I don't think they (Walmart, as is the "them" above) give a good crap about anything other than their bottom line, which means they compromise on security, product quality, employee quality of life, and lots of other things that give the stores a bad vibe.

Put it like this, McDonalds's and other fast food is quick and easy and gives immediate gratification. Is it healthy for you? In most cases no. WalMart is quick and easy and gives immediate gratification. Is it healthy for the surrounding community? In most cases ...

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Nope, it's just that I don't think they (Walmart, as is the "them" above) give a good crap about anything other than their bottom line, which means they compromise on security, product quality, employee quality of life, and lots of other things that give the stores a bad vibe.

Put it like this, McDonalds's and other fast food is quick and easy and gives immediate gratification. Is it healthy for you? In most cases no. WalMart is quick and easy and gives immediate gratification. Is it healthy for the surrounding community? In most cases ...

You just articulated why I like Wal-Mart. No frills, low price, and commensurate expectations. I know what I'm getting and shop elsewhere when it makes sense for me to.

Same thing with fast food, which I eat a lot of if I'm not at home on account of the value menus. My expectation is not that two regular McDonald's hamburgers and a small side of fries (Serving size: 271 grams; 730 calories; 20 grams of fat) are healthy; but they'll cost about three bucks and are convenient and consistent. Compare that to, say, a Turkey BLT from Boston Market (Serving size: 378 grams; 1030 calories; 57 grams of fat)..."oh, but the advertising is so clean-looking, and I paid twice as much for quality!" Yeah, Boston Market will taste better and I'll feel more full, but I haven't the time, the disposable income, or any particular desire to buy into their hype. And what's the sense in over-eating, anyway? I wouldn't patronize either a McDonald's or Boston Market for fine dining, but McDonald's definitely wins out if I need a bite to eat away from home.

And as analogous to Wal-Mart as it is, it's no surprise that there's a McDonald's in most Wal-Marts. It's the perfect pairing.

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Seriously?

Well, people, it's The Niche's world and we're all just lucky to live in it. Please lower your expectations to match his and we stop this sillier-by-the-moment discussion and move on with our bourgeoise little lives...

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Let's just wait and see what kind of Walmart lands here. You have to think they do a bit of research into the neighborhood. I've been to their neighborhood markets before, it's not quite the same as the big ugly like on S Post Oak. And if the parking lot is full of crime, that's your neighbors - and they're already here. It's not like Walmart includes petty thieves in their development plan.

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Seriously?

Well, people, it's The Niche's world and we're all just lucky to live in it. Please lower your expectations to match his and we stop this sillier-by-the-moment discussion and move on with our bourgeoise little lives...

Yeah and in The Niche's world he actually eats McDonalds on a regular basis - ick! Cheap yes - but it makes me sick every time I eat it so I stopped eating there long long time ago. Since I've seen the movies "Super Size Me" and "Food Inc.", it also makes my stomach turn a bit when I hear the name. There's lots of good food for you that is cheaper than McDonalds. How about peanut butter sandwiches and an apple? (easy to pack carry and doesn't need refrigeration either) Beans and Rice....Spaghetti with homemade sauce, fried rice with frozen peas and a bit of meat in it....I could go on and on and on. Don't be lazy people and think it is okay to hear someone from a tin box say "may I take your order?" Please Tthe Niche - try eating a bit more healthy (hey even WalMart has organic foods now) and perhaps you mind and body will improve for it and your postings may be a bit more pleasant ;-D

Shouldn't this thread be merged with the Walmart one - same topic and a the same post by HeyHatch...?

Edited by CleaningLadyinCleveland
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Seriously?

Well, people, it's The Niche's world and we're all just lucky to live in it. Please lower your expectations to match his and we stop this sillier-by-the-moment discussion and move on with our bourgeoise little lives...

I would never suggest that you change your consumer preferences or expectations on account of mine, nor would I seek to deny your neighborhood or our community any retailer that thinks that there's demand enough to make an investment here worthwhile.

Edited by TheNiche
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Saw this today, thought it was relevant:

Smaller stores

If Wal-Mart can succeed in the urban market, that could mean several hundred stores just in major cities like New York, Chicago and Detroit, bringing several hundred million dollars in additional earnings, analysts said.

To fit into cities, Wal-Mart is proposing to make itself more trial-size. It would shrink its stores to as small as 8,000 square feet, about 4 percent of the size of an average supercenter. It is considering formats that are primarily groceries, stores where customers can order items and and pick them up, stores where local business owners can lease space, and even formats like bodegas.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/7079360.html

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Yeah and in The Niche's world he actually eats McDonalds on a regular basis - ick! Cheap yes - but it makes me sick every time I eat it so I stopped eating there long long time ago. Since I've seen the movies "Super Size Me" and "Food Inc.", it also makes my stomach turn a bit when I hear the name. There's lots of good food for you that is cheaper than McDonalds. How about peanut butter sandwiches and an apple? (easy to pack carry and doesn't need refrigeration either) Beans and Rice....Spaghetti with homemade sauce, fried rice with frozen peas and a bit of meat in it....I could go on and on and on. Don't be lazy people and think it is okay to hear someone from a tin box say "may I take your order?" Please Tthe Niche - try eating a bit more healthy (hey even WalMart has organic foods now) and perhaps you mind and body will improve for it and your postings may be a bit more pleasant ;-D

Stop proselytizing me. I don't need your propaganda.

Don't call me lazy.

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Stop proselytizing me. I don't need your propaganda.

It never seems to fail that regardless of how many people take the dissenting view, only one person will ever become the lightning rod for personal attacks from the opposition. I'd try to take some of the heat off you by admitting that even though I hate McDonald's more than Walmart, I had two sausage McMuffins for breakfast yesterday (yes, I'm a big ol' hypocrite), but I fear they've already made you the figurehead of the pro-Walmart movement. Nothing will stop that now, and it doesn't matter your reasons. Emotions trump logic in nearly every argument ever debated.

Don't call me lazy.

You're lazy. And worse, I hear you kick dogs.

Edit: And to the guy who's throwing the negs out for no apparent reason other than to be vindictive, I'm going to counter those as much as I can despite the fact I fundamentally disagree with Niche's point too.

Edited by AtticaFlinch

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I would never suggest that you change your consumer preferences or expectations on account of mine, nor would I seek to deny your neighborhood or our community any retailer that thinks that there's demand enough to make an investment here worthwhile.

See, I don't get why it's better if the retailer gets to choose and not the neighborhood.

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See, I don't get why it's better if the retailer gets to choose and not the neighborhood.

The neighborhood DOES choose, with their wallets. If West Adams did not want Walmart, its sales would slump, it would shut its doors, and move on to a neighborhood or town that wanted its low prices and could tolerate (or did not care about) its business practices. The opposition to a Walmart on Yale is precisely because it WOULD do well. Everyone knows it would do well, and it might thwart efforts by some (not you necessarily) to run the undesirables out of the Heights. This can be seen in many other lightning rods for criticism, such as opposing Starbucks, McMansions, developers, big box stores (except hip Targets), and of course, the effort to make the entire Heights area historic. Certain residents have a self-view that they wish to project by banning everything that does not conform or promote that self-view. Those who do not share that same self-view are forced to comply by ordinance. This practice is at its most extreme in places like Bellaire and West University Place, but it exists in the Heights as well, and is picking up steam. It is the exact same process, only with a different veneer.

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And if the parking lot is full of crime, that's your neighbors - and they're already here. It's not like Walmart includes petty thieves in their development plan.

This isn't really true, research show that most of the crime is "passing through" and not in the neighborhood itself. I can't find the study I read last year in regards to crime, traffic and big box retail stores but the findings were not good. Basically said that the through traffic increase of the area and increased "targets" thats the store attracted made crime rates go up. This was doublely felt by the community because local response times went up and more law enforcement was needed in that area and pulled from neighborhoods, etc...

Following up on the negative tick comment... Where I too disagree with someone giving negative ticks for fundamental view differences and being vindictive. I've followed Niche for a long time and where most comments are intelligent and express opinions with out offense to anyone, (painting a taget on my back here) some comments of late have bordered personal attacks and have had prejudice undertones. Honestly I don't see them as anything but a gauge on the majority opinion of the board, not really a personal right or wrong scale. I mean what happens if you get too many bad ticks? Banishment? If thats the case then I need to find another board.

Just my .02

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See, I don't get why it's better if the retailer gets to choose and not the neighborhood.

Well, I think that for a relatively recent transplant the best thing is to just understand the Houston (and Texas's) economic model from the ground up. Then it might make more sense regarding why people here instinctively take the side of big corporations over all else (including their own well being), and other things will start to make sense, too, such as the lack of emphasis on education and quality of life, etc.

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This isn't really true, research show that most of the crime is "passing through" and not in the neighborhood itself. I can't find the study I read last year in regards to crime, traffic and big box retail stores but the findings were not good.

Out of curiosity, was this study Walmart specific or did it include the massive parking lots of all big box retailers? If the latter, I wonder how it compares to the crime stats of the Sawyer Target. A Walmart on Yale will likely draw the same criminal element as that Target, so what you see there will likely be repeated at Walmart.

Edited by AtticaFlinch

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Out of curiosity, was this study Walmart specific or did it include the massive parking lots of all big box retailers? If the latter, I wonder how it compares to the crime stats of the Sawyer Target. A Walmart on Yale will likely draw the same criminal element as that Target, so what you see there will likely be repeated at Walmart.

It was not walmart specific, it was a general big box retailer study with some definition around "big box" which from what I remember focussed on the square footage and offerings of retail stores. I know that Supercenters and SuperTargets were figured in this particular study. I'd also be curious to see the stats from the new target. I think I might have it at home, will try and dig it out later today.

EDIT: Found something I read that lead me to the research last year.... http://www.ncsociolo...day/raleigh.htm

The part of praticular interest. (Keep in mind I found this when researching why we should NOT have I-10 feeders and on/off ramps)

" A total of 63% of the variance in property crime is explained when all accessibility and opportunity variables are entered into the equation. Opportunity and accessibility measures are very strong predictors for such a small unit of analysis. By explaining a large proportion of the variance in property crime, at a small level of aggregation, we are able to demonstrate that crime is a nonrandom event and is very predictable.

This research has established not only that crime patterns exist, but that crime is more often found in accessible areas with commercial land use. Shopping centers, storage places, schools, service stations, and restaurants tend to attract criminals along with legitimate customers to the area. Hence, commercial centers are good for both business and crime. The type of residential land use also has an effect on property crime. The more housing units on a street segment, the greater the property crime risk. Additionally, street segments without a predominance of owner occupancy are more likely to be victimized. The implications of this research are important in being able to identify "hot spot" areas. If certain areas or even certain places of a city are considered "hot spots" then efforts should be taken towards making these areas less criminogenic by reducing accessibility opportunity and/or increasing guardianship factors. "

Edited by SaintCyr
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Well, I think that for a relatively recent transplant the best thing is to just understand the Houston (and Texas's) economic model from the ground up. Then it might make more sense regarding why people here instinctively take the side of big corporations over all else (including their own well being), and other things will start to make sense, too, such as the lack of emphasis on education and quality of life, etc.

...or perhaps that quality of life is not a one-size-fits-all formula. :wacko: I'd submit to you that understanding a people's value system is a better place to start rather than understanding the consequent economy, which is what those values hath wrought.

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...or perhaps that quality of life is not a one-size-fits-all formula. :wacko: I'd submit to you that understanding a people's value system is a better place to start rather than understanding the consequent economy, which is what those values hath wrought.

Not really. I think you can have similar value systems result in different economies.

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This isn't really true, research show that most of the crime is "passing through" and not in the neighborhood itself.

I have never seen a study suggesting this, and I'm in the business. I will, however, suggest some parameters that might skew a study that concludes this. In general, most residential crime is self inflicted, in that your neighbors, or more commonly, the kids of your neighbors, are the ones breaking into your house, stealing your car, etc. If you define your "neighborhood" small enough, i.e., if you only consider your block and the blocks surrounding it your "neighborhood", it may not apply, but most crime is local, simply because the criminal knows the neighborhood, and transportation is easier. Remember, most criminals are poor. Many are drug addicts. They oftentimes have no transportation, so they steal close to home.

Moving on to retailers, businesses in general cause higher crime rates. Why? That's where the stuff is! And, they are closed at night, so no one is watching. Big retailers cause more crime than little ones. Why? They have more stuff! If you look at a crime data compilation, the highest number is Theft. This category includes shoplifting. If a store opens on your block where a vacant field previously existed, Theft will rise exponentially from 0. Is the neighborhood less safe? From the data, it appears so. In actuality, it is no less safe than before, as your neighbors are the ones committing the theft, and they live nearby already. It is the same neighborhood, but the retail store is a magnet for shoplifting.

Now, lefts look at big box versus mom and pops. The big boxes have more merchandise to steal, they have more floor space to cover, and many more customers, and consequently, thieves. It stands to reason that more theft will occur. Does it mean the neighborhood is less safe? No, for the same reasons as above. In fact, because the retail is concentrated in this smaller area, and the sales volume much higher, it is actually more economical to provide security for the big box than a small store. Despite the claims of some, virtually every Walmart has store security watching for shoplifters, as well as uniformed security watching the parking areas. While some crime inevitably does occur, most of it is committed against Walmart in the form of theft. Given the high number of shoppers, the incidences of crime against shoppers per capita is likely lower. This same phenomenon can be seen in New York City, where the actual numbers of crimes committed are high, as are the number of crimes per square mile, but because of its population density, the incidence of crime per capita is actually low for a big city.

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Not really. I think you can have similar value systems result in different economies.

Though not completely clear, it struck me that your earlier comments were referring to social attitudes towards business and political outgrowths of that, such as corporate welfare disguised as economic development programs, a regressive tax policy with an emphasis on consumption taxes, rabid protectionism of property rights, and so on and so forth. ...as opposed to actually looking at aggregated economic data.

Unless you literally meant, "from the ground up", meaning that our geography and natural resources have something to do with it. But that wouldn't make any sense.

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I have never seen a study suggesting this, and I'm in the business.

Look at the study I posted above, it suggests that. Not saying it is the end all be all but still some sound logic and information worth looking at.

If a store opens on your block where a vacant field previously existed, Theft will rise exponentially from 0. Is the neighborhood less safe? From the data, it appears so. In actuality, it is no less safe than before, as your neighbors are the ones committing the theft, and they live nearby already. It is the same neighborhood, but the retail store is a magnet for shoplifting.

I agree with everything you said in the above post. Except the point quoted... On vacant lots there is actually a HIGHER crime rate than if the lot were developed and used. So the development could possibly then decrease the crime rate ( I think this is a double win because violent crimes are more likely on vacant lots, need to verify tho) which is a good thing.

The only point that I would argue is a negative for the community in regards to crime is that it displaces emergency resources that might be utilized elsewhere in the community. Now that being said, if it brought enough revenue to the city that they would increase said emergency services to a higher capacity this point would be a non-issue. I don't think this is the case how-ever, just my gut feeling. Haven't looked that far into it.

In regards to the Walmart... I won't shop there but thats just my opinion. I am still out on how I feel about it "invading" our neighborhood... Is it better than the past Heights Park or whatever it was called? No, maybe not. Is it better than vacant lots that seem to be a haven for vandalism and vagrants. Yes. This is always the catch with land development.

I think Walmart is smarter than people think when they look at store placement and what the future hold. They know that the only way to keep profits up is cheap labor and cheap transportation, both of which are slowly going away... Wouldn't doubt it if they chose the location (over other nearby locations) for the nearby rail so to keep costs VERY low, as shipment by train is lower than by truck... This is a whole different arguement, which I have found is not well recieved, so I will leave it.

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Though not completely clear, it struck me that your earlier comments were referring to social attitudes towards business and political outgrowths of that, such as corporate welfare disguised as economic development programs, a regressive tax policy with an emphasis on consumption taxes

Yes, but I don't think you have to have a specific social attitude to be on board with Houston's particular economic model.

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Stop proselytizing me. I don't need your propaganda.

Don't call me lazy.

I didn't call you anything - not trying to convert you to a new religion or convince YOU of anything....the post was just about nutrition. Get a dictionary and get over it.

...gotta go "clean" something.

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I didn't call you anything - not trying to convert you to a new religion or convince YOU of anything....the post was just about nutrition. Get a dictionary and get over it.

...gotta go "clean" something.

You said, "Don't be lazy people and think it is okay to hear someone from a tin box say 'may I take your order?'" Your comment was directed at me; I think it's okay to order food via intercom. Therefore I am lazy, according to you.

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Yes, but I don't think you have to have a specific social attitude to be on board with Houston's particular economic model.

I'm sorry Judah, I've tried, but I'm just not clear on what you're trying to communicate.

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I'm sorry Judah, I've tried, but I'm just not clear on what you're trying to communicate.

It's my opinion he's saying Houstonians are dumb and that we don't know what's best for ourselves as well as he does. But don't be offended because 1) he's speaking generally and 2) he specifically excluded you from the general group of dumb people - from which you would have been excluded regardless because he's kept it general and not specifically insulted anyone.

In other words, redundancy.

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