Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JLWM8609

Formula One Racing coming to Austin in 2012

Recommended Posts

Since no racetrack exists in Austin, one will be built.

http://www.autoblog....+%28Autoblog%29

Not that Texas is as gaga over NASCAR as the rest of the south, but this does seem to be a peculiar decision as F1 isn't nearly as popular. And expensive way to make inroads.

I guess, strictly looking at the numbers, Austin can pull some major population numbers within driving distance, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New venues for F1 races are more about how much cash the proposed locales can shower upon the F1 Powers that Be than anything else. Take a look at the grandstands at newer tracks like Bahrain - they're nowhere close to being at capacity, but F1 is only too happy to hold races with practically no attendance as long as the local organizers/governments open their checkbooks and build new tracks.

F1 has been beset with cheating and industrial espionage scandals over the past few years, as well as the well-documented shortcomings of former FIA head Max Mosley. Combined with a formula that drastically limits engine changes and encourages cookie-cutter designs and "racing" that at times is more like an orderly procession with no passing, and it's hard for me to even care anymore. I used to love F1, but there hasn't been a whole lot to get excited about in years.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with you mkultra25. I would rather see American LeMans come to Austin or back to Houston. F1 is probably more corrupt than the Olympics if that's possible. I don't think the Olympics have had an F1 style Nazi Orgy scandal yet. Give them time and I'm sure they'll get there though.

Even though it's a corrupt organization I'll still probably go to the race. I'm sure there's some tax money in the bribes and kickbacks they had to give F1 so since I helped pay for it I should go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I'm super stoked that a F1 race will be so close to home, I've already got a place set up to crash for the entire week preceding the race.

2 years is a short time to complete a track though, and I hope that most of the paperwork to get this done is already taken care of, or on a fast track to completion.

New venues for F1 races are more about how much cash the proposed locales can shower upon the F1 Powers that Be than anything else. Take a look at the grandstands at newer tracks like Bahrain - they're nowhere close to being at capacity, but F1 is only too happy to hold races with practically no attendance as long as the local organizers/governments open their checkbooks and build new tracks.

F1 has been beset with cheating and industrial espionage scandals over the past few years, as well as the well-documented shortcomings of former FIA head Max Mosley. Combined with a formula that drastically limits engine changes and encourages cookie-cutter designs and "racing" that at times is more like an orderly procession with no passing, and it's hard for me to even care anymore. I used to love F1, but there hasn't been a whole lot to get excited about in years.

F1 has its share of issues. I think a lot of the reasons the sport has changed from one of in race passing to one of technical specifications, and pit strategies is only partly due to the rules changes.

I think the drivers are able to produce more reliable results because the cars are overall more predictable. If they are more predictable the drivers can push their cars closer to the limit, and make fewer mistakes that would be caused by the car not responding the way they expect it to.

F1 is the same as it's always been, drivers waiting for a hole to open up to take their advantage. At times they can make that hole themselves by braking later in the corners, or generally being braver than their opponent, but usually the hole makes itself when the driver makes a mistake. The drivers are making fewer mistakes, so there's less opportunity to pass.

Look at China GP from this year as an example. That race was exciting from start to finish. Weather contributed mostly to it, but then at the end when they had to limp to the finish line with crappy tires, it remained exciting to watch. Some cars pitted 8 times I think to change tires, and then they were able to charge through the field again. Rain was unpredictable as it would splutter a bit, then rain heavy, then not at all. Basically, the cars became unpredictable because the weather was unpredictable, and drivers were able to execute maneuvers on the competition that gave them advantages, ultimately the race was decided by pit strategy, but that didn't make it any less exciting to watch.

F1 though, like any sport is going to be more exciting in person. Think about watching a baseball game on TV, you get to watch the game, but go to the game, you get to experience the game. The roar of the crowd around you, the smell of the experience, the sight and feel of it all is something you can't get on TV. The game is boring as hell (IMO) on TV, but going to a game, that's fun. (the Astros I won't comment on)

For a car enthusiast, any kind of race you can see in person is going to be an experience unlike anything you can get on TV. I remember going to the GPoH when Champ car was still on its own. You could feel the cars wooshing down the straight, you could smell the rubber, and feel the heat. When the ALMS cars were on track, you could almost feel the Panos, or Corvette before they got to you, and when they were upon you, the rumble they produced was simply amazing and cannot be reproduced anywhere else. Staying to the end of the race and award ceremony, walking out of the venue as they tore down the track while people were still walking to their cars with the prize of a crappy Formula Mazda tire that will end up in their backyard to be a mosquito breeding ground.

Anyway, sorry, I got carried away, I've always wanted to go to Monaco to experience that for itself, but a close second on my list of things to do while alive was go to at least one F1 event, this will give me the opportunity to go to 10 of them.

If you can't tell, I'm excited.

Edited by samagon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 years is a short time to complete a track though, and I hope that most of the paperwork to get this done is already taken care of, or on a fast track to completion.

Not really. They are usually built with steel seating stands which go up quickly. Texas Motor Speedway, which seats nearly 200,000, was built in under one year.

That press release is a joke. They claim that Austin is the only city capable of pulling this off, then use the hotels, airports and populations of Houston, DFW and San Antonio to make their case. However, as bad as F1 has gotten, I'd still go to an F1 race long before I'd be caught dead at NASCAR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

However, as bad as F1 has gotten, I'd still go to an F1 race long before I'd be caught dead at NASCAR.

Eh... six in one hand, half dozen in the other. They're both just cars going fast - hopefully with a wreck or two. If NASCAR was associated with Europeans instead of hillbillies, and Formula-1 was the race originating in the West Virginia mountains, you'd probably feel differently. I've been to NASCAR before, and I'm neither a redneck nor a hillbilly, and I still had a blast.

Hell, I love going to Baytown to watch the drag races too, though I haven't been there for that since I've been back in Texas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh... six in one hand, half dozen in the other. They're both just cars going fast - hopefully with a wreck or two. If NASCAR was associated with Europeans instead of hillbillies, and Formula-1 was the race originating in the West Virginia mountains, you'd probably feel differently.

I wouldn't feel differently even if Formula I originated in Wilkes County, North Carolina, the Moonshine Capital and birthplace of NASCAR. My derision of NASCAR stems from the use of caricatures of stock cars (including stick on headlights) and the mind-numbingly boring use of oval tracks. To underscore the point, I won't be watching the Indy 500 on Sunday either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't feel differently even if Formula I originated in Wilkes County, North Carolina, the Moonshine Capital and birthplace of NASCAR. My derision of NASCAR stems from the use of caricatures of stock cars (including stick on headlights) and the mind-numbingly boring use of oval tracks. To underscore the point, I won't be watching the Indy 500 on Sunday either.

I think I finally agree with you on something Red. Oval tracks and spec cars suck. It has nothing to do with the fact that NASCAR is popular in the south. The emphasis on drivers as personalities and the fake branding on the cars is a turn off. We all know that's not a Toyota, it's a "car of tommorrow" that looks, sounds and acts like the car of the 50s. ALMS has Porsche, Ferrari, Corvette, BMW, etc.. and they are similiar to the cars you can buy at the dealership; especially Ferrari and Porsche. The 911 GT3 RS and F430 GT are not that far removed from the cars you can get at the dealership. NASCAR is just a bunch of guys driving one car. I don't care about the drivers as much as the engineering that goes into creating a Porsche or Ferrari.

I'm used to being accused of being an elitist though. Red doesn't seem to be the kind of person that gets accused of that much though. It sucks when people make up motivations for your opinions that have nothing to do with reality doesn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, depending on my mood, I've been accused of pretty much everything, including arrogant elitist back when I owned my Porsche. ;)

I completely agree on ALMS, but even Indy cars are cool when they do more than turn left. And I really love the street courses. And, let's face it, NASCAR fans are easy to make fun of. They are devoted to a 'sport' whose rapid rise in popularity occurred when the personalities began 'trading paint' and fighting each other in the pits. The marketing geniuses at NASCAR may have struck gold when they created WWE on wheels, but I will still smirk when I see the slanted numbers on your pickup and the $400 orange leather Home Depot jacket on your back.

BTW, we haven't even brought up my all-time favorite racing yet....

1801112914154.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, depending on my mood, I've been accused of pretty much everything, including arrogant elitist back when I owned my Porsche. wink.gif

My reaction is reflexive at this point. It doesn't really take into consideration your past history of being more than unidimensional. My response is accurate for most people who denigrate NASCAR though. Most people laugh at the events because of the fans of the events, regardless of whether or not they'd actually enjoy themselves personally at a race.

Anyhow, my favorite type of racing is definitely drag racing, and they don't even turn left. It's just a few seconds of driving straight. That's more trailer park than even NASCAR can muster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I finally agree with you on something Red. Oval tracks and spec cars suck. It has nothing to do with the fact that NASCAR is popular in the south. The emphasis on drivers as personalities and the fake branding on the cars is a turn off. We all know that's not a Toyota, it's a "car of tommorrow" that looks, sounds and acts like the car of the 50s. ALMS has Porsche, Ferrari, Corvette, BMW, etc.. and they are similiar to the cars you can buy at the dealership; especially Ferrari and Porsche. The 911 GT3 RS and F430 GT are not that far removed from the cars you can get at the dealership. NASCAR is just a bunch of guys driving one car. I don't care about the drivers as much as the engineering that goes into creating a Porsche or Ferrari.

I'm used to being accused of being an elitist though. Red doesn't seem to be the kind of person that gets accused of that much though. It sucks when people make up motivations for your opinions that have nothing to do with reality doesn't it?

My sentiments exactly, while F1 teams don't have a lot of leeway anymore thanks to the FIA, the cars are sufficiently different in design, different gearing, aero packages, suspension, and various other things to keep them somewhat unique.

I much more enjoyed watching ALMS over Champ Car when they were here. I feel the same way about any of it, NASCAR, F1, Top Fuel Dragsters. Put the drivers behind the wheel of a car that was driven out of a dealer last week, and had a roll cage and other safety equipment put in after stripping the interior, add some sticky tires and send 'em out. IMO Rally is one of the last real forms of motorsports, and that is quickly being FIA'd to death.

What F1 has over NASCAR is technology (as you said, cars of tomorrow still using carburetors? Seriously?), and tracks they race on. Watching cars going in circles for 500 miles is not exactly what I consider entertainment (fiery wrecks OTOH..), watching open wheel action around some reducing radius turns, or off camber corners, that gets me excited. It isn't that the NASCAR driver doesn't have to do as much, driving at an average speed over 200mph door to door is just as challenging as driving at an average speed around 125mph on some guys gearbox around all sorts of corners, circles just aren't as fun to watch.

Anyway, I look forward to seeing where the location is and the design of the track, hopefully some of you guys that know your way around city paperwork can find some info on where the land is :)

As to the time it will take to build the track, most recent tracks have come together in ~18 months, but that is just building time, so I guess we'll see!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever happened to the one in downtown houston?

It's a long story, the full story dates back to the 70s. Champ Car was the series that competed in Houston, they folded into Indy Racing League a few years ago.

IRL split its races between IRL and Champ Car circuits, the IRL said they liked Houston, but haven't put us back on the map, and we likely won't ever see another race through the streets of Houston again, well, not legal anyway.

I will hold out hope that this track in Austin will see ALMS and IRL races in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It isn't that the NASCAR driver doesn't have to do as much, driving at an average speed over 200mph door to door is just as challenging as driving at an average speed around 125mph on some guys gearbox around all sorts of corners, circles just aren't as fun to watch.

Except that they don't. Last weekend's race averaged less than 76 mph. The fastest race this season was only 135 mph. Daytona was only 132 mph. The fastest track averages in the 180s. Even qualifying doesn't hit 200 mph, since the advent of restrictor plates in the late 80s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Except that they don't. Last weekend's race averaged less than 76 mph. The fastest race this season was only 135 mph. Daytona was only 132 mph. The fastest track averages in the 180s. Even qualifying doesn't hit 200 mph, since the advent of restrictor plates in the late 80s.

ha, well, I guess there's even less reason for me to want to watch them.

how the hell do they manage to hit each other if they aren't going that fast? are they talking on their cell phones during the races? maybe applying makeup? fishing the last french fry out from between the seats?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NASCAR is a joke. Nothing but Bubba turning left and keeping the pedal to the metal. That is not racing.

F1, F2, LeMans Prototypes, SCCA - That is racing. Unfortunately the US is is full of Babbas who cannot appreciate good roadracing. It is sort of like the popularity of Budweiser (American Piss) Beer versus a well made, craft brewed IPA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NASCAR is a joke. Nothing but Bubba turning left and keeping the pedal to the metal. That is not racing.

F1, F2, LeMans Prototypes, SCCA - That is racing. Unfortunately the US is is full of Babbas who cannot appreciate good roadracing. It is sort of like the popularity of Budweiser (American Piss) Beer versus a well made, craft brewed IPA.

Say what you will, but on a hot August afternoon while sitting beside a pool, I'd rather have an ice cold Bud Light in my hand than a well made, craft brewed IPA.

Also, I'm easily what can be classified as a beer snob, and I've been known to say about IPAs, "The bitterer, the betterer."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Say what you will, but on a hot August afternoon while sitting beside a pool, I'd rather have an ice cold Bud Light in my hand than a well made, craft brewed IPA.

Also, I'm easily what can be classified as a beer snob, and I've been known to say about IPAs, "The bitterer, the betterer."

Excessive heat has been known to addle the brain. Be careful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excessive heat has been known to addle the brain. Be careful.

I'm as beer snob as anybody, but the cheap stuff has its place too. There's a difference between quality and good. After mowing the lawn, a crappy light beer just works better. If you know you are going to drink 6 or more in a day, you don't want to do that with Sierra Nevada, it will hurt much more then next day. But if I want 1 or 2 good beers while I sit down after putting kids to bed, I will be more picky. It's just like the fast food argument. No one thinks Taco Bell is better than El Tiempo, but sometimes you just want a baja chalupa.

As for NASCAR, the typical fans is only interested in a certain level of complexity. NASCAR races are much more about the experience and the entire day/weekend than they are keeping up with the race. It's about getting wasted on the center lawn and hoping for a fiery crash. F1 is just completely different. I bet those F1 cars are much easier to race too, they are faster and can turn much better, so it's more about just driving and less about how you manage in a crowd. I don't watch either so I don't really care. I think it would be fun to attend any race, especially when there is 2 days of tailgating and alcohol consumption involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm as beer snob as anybody, but the cheap stuff has its place too. There's a difference between quality and good. After mowing the lawn, a crappy light beer just works better. If you know you are going to drink 6 or more in a day, you don't want to do that with Sierra Nevada, it will hurt much more then next day. But if I want 1 or 2 good beers while I sit down after putting kids to bed, I will be more picky. It's just like the fast food argument. No one thinks Taco Bell is better than El Tiempo, but sometimes you just want a baja chalupa.

As for NASCAR, the typical fans is only interested in a certain level of complexity. NASCAR races are much more about the experience and the entire day/weekend than they are keeping up with the race. It's about getting wasted on the center lawn and hoping for a fiery crash. F1 is just completely different. I bet those F1 cars are much easier to race too, they are faster and can turn much better, so it's more about just driving and less about how you manage in a crowd. I don't watch either so I don't really care. I think it would be fun to attend any race, especially when there is 2 days of tailgating and alcohol consumption involved.

I love some good bavarian beer, but I agree, after doing some yard work, the full bodied flavor of coors, the banquette beer, is what I'm after.

easy to race I'd say is pretty tough to gauge...

F1 cars weigh in at roughly 1300lbs, have a ton of downforce, and about 900 horsepower, 200 torque, and can spin about 18000 rpm

NASCAR cars weigh in at about 3400lbs, have no downforce, and about 750 horsepower, 500 torque, and can spin about 9000 rpm

neither have ABS, and as of the 2008 season (for F1), neither have any form of traction control either.

it's a completely different skillset needed for each, but I'd say if you put two top drivers from each series in a neutral car and had them race in neutral conditions, it would be a pretty fair race.

check out the Race of Champions for a pretty good reference point for that, it started out as just Rally drivers, but now they take drivers from NASCAR, F1, Rally, LeMans, etc, and put them in all different types of cars running all sorts of different challenges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it would be fun to attend any race, especially when there is 2 days of tailgating and alcohol consumption involved.

In terms of visceral pleasure, I can easily rank the four race categories of which I've had the pleasure of watching live and/or participating in.

1) Drag Racing

2) Dirt Track Stock Car

3) NASCAR

4) Indy (road course - back in the day when Houston had it for a couple years)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In terms of visceral pleasure, I can easily rank the four race categories of which I've had the pleasure of watching live and/or participating in.

1) Drag Racing

2) Dirt Track Stock Car

3) NASCAR

4) Indy (road course - back in the day when Houston had it for a couple years)

Maybe one day I'll get a chance to rank those personally. My list consists of

1) Dog track

2) Monster truck/tractor pull/ATV super-cross type thing

The dog track wins because on either Wednesday or Thursday it's 50 cent beer, 50 cent hot dogs, and each time I've gone I show up with 10 bucks and leave with over 40.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Construction finally under way on Austin's F1 facility

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 9:25 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30, 2010

Published: 7:58 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30, 2010

Not long after the stunning announcement in May that Austin had landed a Formula One race, organizers said they hoped to begin moving dirt by December in order to complete construction in time for the inaugural U.S. Grand Prix race in 2012. Then months slipped by without much happening on the site.Until this week, that is, when groundbreaking finally got under way on the 970-acre tract southeast of Austin

Link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Construction finally under way on Austin's F1 facility

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 9:25 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30, 2010

Published: 7:58 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30, 2010

Link

Thanks, I heard they broke ground on this last week, good to see verification! The closer we get, and the more things that are done to make this actually happen, the more excited I get that it's actually going to be completed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another update, they named it, not big news, but still good to note that progress is still going, and it's becoming more of a reality, at least for race fans :)

At a special press conference yesterday, the United States Grand Prix group responsible for bringing F1 back to the United States in 2012, officially named its Austin facility, Circuit of the Americas.

http://www.pitpass.com/fes_php/pitpass_news_item.php?fes_art_id=43346

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, we haven't even brought up my all-time favorite racing yet....

1801112914154.jpg

Well let me be the first to bring up some good news to you, the race track in Austin will now host both F1 & MotoGP, both race cars racing and motorcycle racing will be featured on this track.

Read about it here: http://houston.culturemap.com/newsdetail/04-12-11-motorcycles-and-music-too-austins-new-formula-one-track-to-get-motogp-races-concerts-in-international-push/

Also here: http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2011/04/12/formula-one-austin-to-host-motorcycle.html

another update, they named it, not big news, but still good to note that progress is still going, and it's becoming more of a reality, at least for race fans :)

http://www.pitpass.com/fes_php/pitpass_news_item.php?fes_art_id=43346

That wasn't the only news. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

both race cars racing and motorcycle racing will be featured on this track.

Read about it here: http://houston.cultu...rnational-push/

Also here: http://www.bizjourna...motorcycle.html

That wasn't the only news. :)

awesome!

it is worth pointing out that they won't be on the track at the same time :-p

thanks for the additional information, the article I posted also hinted that the venue will be used for concerts and other uses as well.

I'm looking forward to it, and maybe the ALMS will find a home here, not as great as when I could ride the light rail to go see ALMS, but a few hour drive to see it will be good as well :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

more information from a few days ago.

http://www.insidelin...n-f1-track.html

I hope it's just an article to sow some doubt, but that things are actually going forward smoothly, who knows I guess.

It wouldn't be the first time that F1 left someone up a creek, but I'm hopeful the race goes as planned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm hopeful as well, there's a lot of good race series that are already committed, and if it happens more will surely join. It looks like a very exciting track.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Formula 1 race is this weekend, so it looks like the stars aligned.

Personally, I opted out of the opening race, there will be lots of traffic issues that have to be worked out, as well as other logistical issues that I'm not really wanting to be a part of.

Next year though, I will be there, and no doubt that I will be there for other races that they have.

I've watched some of the laps they did after finishing the track, this is going to be a great track for racing!

edit: here's the track layout:

visit_track_diagram.png

Edited by samagon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Formula 1 race is this weekend, so it looks like the stars aligned.

Personally, I opted out of the opening race, there will be lots of traffic issues that have to be worked out, as well as other logistical issues that I'm not really wanting to be a part of.

Next year though, I will be there, and no doubt that I will be there for other races that they have.

samagon, you should have bought a ticket! I'm prepared to lay odds this is a really special, one-time event, made possible by an unusual synergy of impressionable bubbas, male and female (notable Susan Combs), and smooth Scandinavian guys.

No worries as to logistics -- a shakedown was conducted a couple weeks ago, Austin-style: a foot race. Even though the city declined to build a new customs facility as the race planners wished, all other bugs have been worked out, despite the ongoing litigation, and it is certain to be a success. At least, with civic pride at stake (Mexico City! London! Melbourne! Austin??) haters and non-haters alike now find ourselves in the position of hoping so, though it's not clear we will know whether it was or it wasn't, there being only a few dozen locals who understand the sport of Formula One.

"Did the hookers come?" will probably be all we have to go by.

The newspaper helpfully ran a series of F1 tutorials last year. I'm a leg up having watched "Le Mans" on the late show one time. That's F1 ... I'm pretty sure.

There was very little dialogue in that movie. It was hard to stay awake during the frequent record club commercials. And I remember thinking Steve McQueen with sideburns was not as "cute" as he was in "The Great Escape."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's gonna be a straightup PAR-TAY in atx this weekend... formula 1 brings in a very, very jetset crowd. kinda wish i was going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll hand it to them, the achievement of the track in less than a year is amazing. and this weekend: Mario Andretti is here. Cheap Trick! Aerosmith! (?) Helicopters everywhere. A table at La Zona Rosa, which usually hosts events like People's Community Clinic fundraisers, is $50,000. The cars look like the very coolest ones from your 40-year-old Hot Wheels set, but each one has a hundred laptops monitoring it. There's a button on the steering wheel the drivers can press on the straightaway, which makes them fly...

I still think the operative image of the track, though, will be: sitting idle, empty, giving rise to conversations like "The Future of the Astrodome," all that pavement needlessly radiating heat.

In not-unconnected news, now that Susan Combs has fallen off the GOP statewide-office ladder (and haven't they all been so patient!) I see that Hispanic George P. Bush is considering a run for comptroller, AG, or land commissioner. He has the skill set for all three, apparently! (I'm sure he does, actually.) He may well make a comforting transitional figure, the last Republican.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The track will get use through the year when not being used for F1, there's already races set up for motoGP, V8 Supercars, and they'll have more major events lined up as well, but in addition to that, they will have track days and other special events at the course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Racetrack economics are a dodgy thing, most certianly when F1 is involved. The boss of F1 has a bit of a scorched earth reputation for taking every penny of value produced by his enterprise and not letting anyone else get much benefit. Hopefully CotA will stay afloat, it looks top notch in the pictures I've seen.

The problem is, however, that the only racing in the US popular enought to make money is NASCAR, and they are not coming to a track like this, so you have the international circus in F1 and MotoGP coming through for two weekends a year with a lot of other small time users that barely pay the operating costs for the time they are there. Maybe IndyCar, should it survive, will bring a race, though that would compete against what they are bringing to Houston.

American LeMans and others will probably get in if they can afford to.

Edited by Nate99

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no follower of IndyCar, so I had no idea they were coming back to Houston, but I'll be there for sure!

It's unfortunate that NASCAR has such a stranglehold on US racing fans, I hope that is changing with F1 coming back to the states, I read an article that quoted Ecclestone that he wanted more races in USA, of course, with Ecclestone, we'll see, but the number I've seen is he wants 3 total. I could see them dropping one of the two races in Spain, as controversial as the race has become in Bahrain I could see them dropping that one as well to make room for more US circuits. One east coast, one west coast to compliment Texas.

The race this last weekend was a terrific success, and while the track has many years to establish itself, it is the best track Tilke has ever designed, and in time it could be one of the more iconic and memorable tracks. Turn 1 looks menacing, but turn 19 is the real technical booger of a corner.

Anyway, yeah, it will take a lot to keep this thing afloat, but they've done a lot of the right things, and the first race was really memorable (in a memorable season).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...