Jump to content

3009 Post Oak: Office Building For Uptown


Recommended Posts

Maybe it's just the proximity to Williams Tower, but this building feels really small for ~17 floors, especially when coming from the south or east. Still, it's highly visible from those directions, so that's good.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 186
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

She might not be the most attractive building, but the glass looks pretty cool with the sun reflecting off of it at sunset.   3009 Post Oak by Bryan Malloch, on Flickr

A few more pics Here I just wanted to show part of the parking garage. I thought someone said they hadn't started on it yet.

IMG_0954 by Not.Larry.Dierker, on Flickr

Posted Images

ArchFan and Gary have echoed what I have been saying here for years. People would literally travel from around the world at one time to Houston just for the architecture. So to see the designs overall that have been chosen to rise here in the past 20 years have been heartbreaking on some levels. Mediocrity has quietly become a part of Houston's culture.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ArchFan and Gary have echoed what I have been saying here for years. People would literally travel from around the world at one time to Houston just for the architecture. So to see the designs overall that have been chosen to rise here in the past 20 years have been heartbreaking on some levels. Mediocrity has quietly become a part of Houston's culture.

 

I've observed that most of our new buildings' designs seem to be a few years behind. The entire Memorial City skyline looks like it was designed in the late 90's. Calpine Center sticks out in my mind as well. All of these buildings were being built across the country over a decade ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If they had built this in Sweden, I imagine they would have designed it differently.  However, they are investing in Houston, so they planned things according to what they think will be most profitable in this market.  <sigh>

this is spot on. these building have been designed to maximize efficiencies, square footage and ultimately profits. and in all honesty the tenants who are leasing significant amounts of space in these buildings want the same. the more a developer spends on designing, building and operating a building the more they have to charge for rent (and often times operating costs) and those get directly passed thru to the tenant.

back when money was free (late 70's early 80's) is was easy to build grandiose projects but unfortunately, in Houston at least, those projects just aren't feasible w/o the owner/developer taking substantial risks. Companies (tenants and landlords) in houston have become a lot more prudent since the architectural heyday 30 years ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've observed that most of our new buildings' designs seem to be a few years behind. The entire Memorial City skyline looks like it was designed in the late 90's. Calpine Center sticks out in my mind as well. All of these buildings were being built across the country over a decade ago.

Then I guess we're not doing so bad... Calpine Center was built a decade ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

this is spot on. these building have been designed to maximize efficiencies, square footage and ultimately profits. and in all honesty the tenants who are leasing significant amounts of space in these buildings want the same. the more a developer spends on designing, building and operating a building the more they have to charge for rent (and often times operating costs) and those get directly passed thru to the tenant.

back when money was free (late 70's early 80's) is was easy to build grandiose projects but unfortunately, in Houston at least, those projects just aren't feasible w/o the owner/developer taking substantial risks. Companies (tenants and landlords) in houston have become a lot more prudent since the architectural heyday 30 years ago.

 

It's a matter of pride.  Ken Lay had some problems, but he also had a unique civic sense in that he thought building a great building would benefit not just his company but also the city.  So in the late 90's he held an architectural competition to see who could produce the best design for Enron Center South.  Cesar Pelli won - the biggest name architect to come to Houston in thirty years.

 

When the Transco Tower was built in the early 80's, the CEO Jack Bowen agreed to make his top-floor employees go through the inconvenience of changing elevators halfway up so that the building could have a slimmer profile and thus be more striking.  It cost more money and reduced convenience (and thus rents), but the result was something to be proud of.

 

If it is true that there are hard fiscal reasons why such architectural pride is not possible today, you'll have to explain to me why the same energy executives seem to have lost none of their pride in building mansions, buying expensive cars, eating at five-star restaurants, and covering their wives in high dollar clothing and jewelry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is true that there are hard fiscal reasons why such architectural pride is not possible today, you'll have to explain to me why the same energy executives seem to have lost none of their pride in building mansions, buying expensive cars, eating at five-star restaurants, and covering their wives in high dollar clothing and jewelry.

seriously???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Then I guess we're not doing so bad... Calpine Center was built a decade ago.

 

Let me be more specific...Calpine Center was completed in 2003. Buildings similar in facade were going up else where in the late 90's, so 4-6 years. Anyways, just a simple delicate flower. This 3009 Post Oak is another example, 6-7 years too late.

Edited by Montrose1100
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a matter of pride.  Ken Lay had some problems, but he also had a unique civic sense in that he thought building a great building would benefit not just his company but also the city.  So in the late 90's he held an architectural competition to see who could produce the best design for Enron Center South.  Cesar Pelli won - the biggest name architect to come to Houston in thirty years.

 

That's a bit of an odd thing to say.  There were quite a few Cesar Pelli-designed buildings in Houston prior to his coming to Houston for the Enron Center South building.    And is Cesar Pelli a decisively bigger name architect than Philip Johnson, IM Pei?  I would think not.

 

Many on this board seem to think that all (or nearly all) buildings being built elsewhere are architecturally significant and that all building built in Houston in the 80s were architecturally significant.  Neither is true.  In almost all places, the beauties are far outnumbered by the ho-hum.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a bit of an odd thing to say.  There were quite a few Cesar Pelli-designed buildings in Houston prior to his coming to Houston for the Enron Center South building.    And is Cesar Pelli a decisively bigger name architect than Philip Johnson, IM Pei?  I would think not.

 

Many on this board seem to think that all (or nearly all) buildings being built elsewhere are architecturally significant and that all building built in Houston in the 80s were architecturally significant.  Neither is true.  In almost all places, the beauties are far outnumbered by the ho-hum.

 

I don't think Pelli is bigger than Philip Johnson or I.M. Pei either.  Unless I'm wrong, it's been about 30 years since either of those guys did an office building in Houston.  I did overlook the Chapel of St. Basil that Johnson did in the 90's, so I guess you've got me there, though it seems a small point to quibble over.

 

Yes, Pelli did prior buildings in Houston.  Doesn't really affect what I said in any substantive way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

From the Press Release:

 

Skanska is selling the office property at 3009 Post Oak Boulevard in Houston, Texas. The selling price amounts to USD 112 M, about SEK 730 M and the buyer is Post Oak Building LLC, a subsidiary of the anchor tenant alliantgroup. The transaction will be recorded in the third quarter 2013.

The 3009 Post Oak project is Skanska’s first completed commercial development project in Houston. It is a twenty story, 28,000 square-meter office building with 12 stories of office space sitting atop an eight story parking garage, located in the premiere Uptown/Galleria submarket of Houston.

The building is LEED pre-certified at Platinum level and includes high efficient glass façade, energy recovery wheel and occupancy monitoring systems that focuses on maximizing energy efficiency and operational savings. In addition, the building has a sophisticated lighting control system for the office and garage areas as well as water savings with a rainwater collection system used for landscape irrigation.

Edited by tangledwoods
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

i never noticed the fins that stick out from the corners on the post oak side until today. kind of cool looking. 

the site/parking lot on the corner across the street to the south, just north of the pond/next to 610, had a green fence up around it like construction was going on there. does anyone know what that will be?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

This 2008 looking building will really be an eye sore amongst all the other great buildings in uptown that people come from all over the world to see.

14470996221_6d25c1d381_m.jpg

 

....it could be worse!  howard hughes corporation is placing 4-6 of these babies from 8-12 stories on prime lake front property in the woodlands.  be glad for your pretty glass box with painted garage.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's still getting a paint job, but I've gotta say that garage is really ugly. Too bad it will be the most prominent feature most people will see. I guess there aren't many ways to dress up seven stories of concrete that look like a sloping gash in the side of a building, but perhaps some more trees would eventually help.

 

Another seemingly inexpensive way to improve aesthetics:  Providence Hospital's garage from Interstate 84 in Portland.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
  • 2 years later...
  • Highrise Tower changed the title to 3009 Post Oak: Office Building For Uptown

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...