Jump to content

Houston19514

Recommended Posts

If the poster's concerns were legitimate--and they aren't because the obligations that the City would have to provide for aren't worth the value of his/her property taxes--then it'd mean something that you're wrong on this point. They don't receive HPD service and pay for all their own infrastructure through a MUD. Also, the City is not above annexing strip centers without annexing neighborhoods, so their sales taxes already go to fund the city services that they aren't using all of.

Not getting annexed, actually, is sort of the worst of all possible worlds for the people who are against it.

I'm forever amazed at the annexation/anti-annexation arguments. The amount of mis-information relative to the awesome sum of experiential evidence is somewhat stunning. I think the problem is that the pro-annexation crowd can't get over the myth that those who live "in county" somehow manage to receive "free" services from the COH that the residents of COH pay for but aren't compensated for. Whether or not the concerns alluded to are legitimate isn't something I can validate; it's a topic that arose in the thread. It's possible that the COH might see that again, the low property values wouldn't compensate them for the services they'd have to provide and do one of their "strip annexations" up the feeder of I-45 to take in the Exxon office park.

What I find somewhat amusing is this thought that we get the benefit of HPD without having to pay for it as though HPD was a benefit. HPD is the problem, not the benefit. Or to put it another way, we get the benefit of HPD being virtually non-existent in the form of roaming criminals who eventually run afoul of the law in the County jurisdiction. "Getting Annexed" means that we get what they got in Kingwood. Fire and Ambulance service that can't find the residences and Barney Fife, three half days a week in a Blue & White who sees it as his job to pass out tickets to the unsuspecting on Kingwood Blvd. It would be hilarious if it weren't for the fact that there have already been reported deaths of people waiting for bambulance service, (I have a friend who lives in Kingwood who will regail anyone in earshot of the horror stories). What actually happens is that once an area is annexed by COH, it's as though it's been roped off. Emergency calls are bipassed by Sherrif and PCT. 4 because HPD/HFD are now seen as first responders. So the only way around this is for those neighborhoods that can, continue with the same contract constabulary service they paid for before Annexation, but..............for whatever reason, and I suspect it's turf war problems, the response times go way, way up. If you really want to see the benefits of annexation.......take a trip to Willow Brook mall. It's not Westwood yet......but it's getting there fast.

Having said all that I don't have a dog in this hunt; I only live in Spring because the house is paid for and with only a few work years left there's little reason to move. Upon retirement, we'll sell the place and move permanently to the Hill country. My hope and prayer for those of you who live in COH is that one day, maybe, (but I won't hold my breath), you'll get a Mayor that will see services as a priority and not a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live Inside the Loop and other than the damn potholes, I don't have any issues with regards to services in Houston. About on par with my experiences in Boston.

Back on topic, I heard from a very good source today the Exxon might officially be coming home to it's Humble roots! Apparently this corporate spread will do more than just consolidate employees...it will bring the headquarters to the place it should have moved several years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My hope and prayer for those of you who live in COH is that one day, maybe, (but I won't hold my breath), you'll get a Mayor that will see services as a priority and not a problem.

Honestly, we don't need your hopes and prayers. You trot along to the Hill Country. We'll be just fine. I have to admit though, that anyone complaining about HPD ticketing policies while living in Precinct 4's jurisdiction loses ALL credibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm forever amazed at the annexation/anti-annexation arguments. The amount of mis-information relative to the awesome sum of experiential evidence is somewhat stunning. I think the problem is that the pro-annexation crowd can't get over the myth that those who live "in county" somehow manage to receive "free" services from the COH that the residents of COH pay for but aren't compensated for. Whether or not the concerns alluded to are legitimate isn't something I can validate; it's a topic that arose in the thread. It's possible that the COH might see that again, the low property values wouldn't compensate them for the services they'd have to provide and do one of their "strip annexations" up the feeder of I-45 to take in the Exxon office park.

What I find somewhat amusing is this thought that we get the benefit of HPD without having to pay for it as though HPD was a benefit. HPD is the problem, not the benefit. Or to put it another way, we get the benefit of HPD being virtually non-existent in the form of roaming criminals who eventually run afoul of the law in the County jurisdiction. "Getting Annexed" means that we get what they got in Kingwood. Fire and Ambulance service that can't find the residences and Barney Fife, three half days a week in a Blue & White who sees it as his job to pass out tickets to the unsuspecting on Kingwood Blvd. It would be hilarious if it weren't for the fact that there have already been reported deaths of people waiting for bambulance service, (I have a friend who lives in Kingwood who will regail anyone in earshot of the horror stories). What actually happens is that once an area is annexed by COH, it's as though it's been roped off. Emergency calls are bipassed by Sherrif and PCT. 4 because HPD/HFD are now seen as first responders. So the only way around this is for those neighborhoods that can, continue with the same contract constabulary service they paid for before Annexation, but..............for whatever reason, and I suspect it's turf war problems, the response times go way, way up. If you really want to see the benefits of annexation.......take a trip to Willow Brook mall. It's not Westwood yet......but it's getting there fast.

Having said all that I don't have a dog in this hunt; I only live in Spring because the house is paid for and with only a few work years left there's little reason to move. Upon retirement, we'll sell the place and move permanently to the Hill country. My hope and prayer for those of you who live in COH is that one day, maybe, (but I won't hold my breath), you'll get a Mayor that will see services as a priority and not a problem.

Let me be perfectly clear. Regardless of your issues with the quality of City of Houston services, Houston doesn't want to annex you. Your already-declining demographics, deteriorating infrastructure, and low taxable value are issues that disqualify you from consideration. The fact is that an attempt by the City of Houston at annexing a neighborhood in Spring would be a freakish abberation, and your constant worrying that you are a target is akin to a morbidly-obese woman worrying about getting stalked and raped. You should be far more concerned with internal matters such as a neighborhood watch or the enforcement of deed restrictions than you are with getting annexed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me be perfectly clear. Regardless of your issues with the quality of City of Houston services, Houston doesn't want to annex you. Your already-declining demographics, deteriorating infrastructure, and low taxable value are issues that disqualify you from consideration. The fact is that an attempt by the City of Houston at annexing a neighborhood in Spring would be a freakish abberation, and your constant worrying that you are a target is akin to a morbidly-obese woman worrying about getting stalked and raped. You should be far more concerned with internal matters such as a neighborhood watch or the enforcement of deed restrictions than you are with getting annexed.

I was thinking a toothless meth casualty working at the quick lube and fantasizing about Megan Fox, but that might be more east Montgomery County.

In all seriousness, I was not aware the COH had annexation sights anywhere at the moment. Do they?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fact is that an attempt by the City of Houston at annexing a neighborhood in Spring would be a freakish abberation, and your constant worrying that you are a target is akin to a morbidly-obese woman worrying about getting stalked and raped.

Houston doesn't want to rape Spring because it's a big fat ugly girl. It wanted to rape the Woodlands, but the Woodlands keeps mace in its purse. It's all about power not sex.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was thinking a toothless meth casualty working at the quick lube and fantasizing about Megan Fox, but that might be more east Montgomery County.

In all seriousness, I was not aware the COH had annexation sights anywhere at the moment. Do they?

Absolutely. Just do the paperwork, etc. and there's another chunk o' Houston. Not quite that simple, but if the CoH wants to annex, there's not much that can be done. I think the best thing Houston can do in general is maintain the right to veto incorporations within Harris County to preserve teh ability to annex in the future. Houston has to avoid ending up like Dallas, where the city can't grow because of the inforporated communities that surround it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely. Just do the paperwork, etc. and there's another chunk o' Houston. Not quite that simple, but if the CoH wants to annex, there's not much that can be done. I think the best thing Houston can do in general is maintain the right to veto incorporations within Harris County to preserve teh ability to annex in the future. Houston has to avoid ending up like Dallas, where the city can't grow because of the inforporated communities that surround it.

Aside from The Woodlands, I don't think that there's too much concern about new municipalities being formed in the ETJ. They'd have to amalgamate many different MUDs under one umbrella, but the burden of MUD bonds would be absorbed unevenly by a new municipality. And that'd create a lot of tension.

What is more likely is that even now we are witnessing the rise of the Management District as a replacement for municipal annexations of residential areas. Management Districts have the authority to tax and can be tasked with essentially any of the services typically provided for by a municipality. They can be responsible for utilities, services, or both. They can even overlap with MUDs or municipalities.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live Inside the Loop and other than the damn potholes, I don't have any issues with regards to services in Houston. About on par with my experiences in Boston.

Back on topic, I heard from a very good source today the Exxon might officially be coming home to it's Humble roots! Apparently this corporate spread will do more than just consolidate employees...it will bring the headquarters to the place it should have moved several years ago.

Irving seems pretty confident that they won't leave:

"We would certainly hate to lose them, and we're going to do everything we can to communicate that we do want them here in the North Texas region and in Irving," Wallace said.

He said the chamber has already told Exxon that officials want a chance to offer a retention package if leaving becomes a consideration.

Irving officials are quick to brag about the stable of high-profile and Fortune 500 companies that call the city and its Las Colinas Urban Center home.

They've long seen Exxon's headquarters as a source of pride and a marketing tool in luring other business behemoths.

The company also donates money to many North Texas charities.

Exxon's Jeffers said the company undertakes such real estate studies periodically, and might choose the status quo.

"As the business changes and evolves you continually look at what your requirements are and make sure they're appropriate," he said.

Jeffers said the study doesn't include XTO Energy, the Fort Worth natural gas producer that Exxon recently agreed to buy. The deal hasn't yet closed.

Irving Mayor Herbert Gears said he's not worried about Exxon leaving.

He said big companies like to keep their corporate headquarters and operational hubs separate.

He said Irving's business-friendly reputation, North Texas setting and proximity to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport make it hard for other cities to compete.

"We think however many ways you study it and look at it, you're going to come to that conclusion," he said.

Gears echoed Wallace's willingness to aggressively woo Exxon if need be. But both men also played down the study.

"You're talking about the largest public company in the world," Gears said. "These types of periodic reviews are conducted so they are always understanding and updating their business models for efficiency and effectiveness."

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/bus/stories/DN-exxon_30bus.ART0.State.Edition1.3cc2381.html

I think that they will most likely move. It's about time anyway. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I heard over the weekend that ExxonMobil will not be moving the corporate headquarters to Houston but that this new campus will bring a very significant number of ExxonMobil employees into Houston from outside of Texas. The numbers I heard were much larger than I expected. This is great news for Houston.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm forever amazed at the annexation/anti-annexation arguments. The amount of mis-information relative to the awesome sum of experiential evidence is somewhat stunning. I think the problem is that the pro-annexation crowd can't get over the myth that those who live "in county" somehow manage to receive "free" services from the COH that the residents of COH pay for but aren't compensated for. Whether or not the concerns alluded to are legitimate isn't something I can validate; it's a topic that arose in the thread. It's possible that the COH might see that again, the low property values wouldn't compensate them for the services they'd have to provide and do one of their "strip annexations" up the feeder of I-45 to take in the Exxon office park.

What I find somewhat amusing is this thought that we get the benefit of HPD without having to pay for it as though HPD was a benefit. HPD is the problem, not the benefit. Or to put it another way, we get the benefit of HPD being virtually non-existent in the form of roaming criminals who eventually run afoul of the law in the County jurisdiction. "Getting Annexed" means that we get what they got in Kingwood. Fire and Ambulance service that can't find the residences and Barney Fife, three half days a week in a Blue & White who sees it as his job to pass out tickets to the unsuspecting on Kingwood Blvd. It would be hilarious if it weren't for the fact that there have already been reported deaths of people waiting for bambulance service, (I have a friend who lives in Kingwood who will regail anyone in earshot of the horror stories). What actually happens is that once an area is annexed by COH, it's as though it's been roped off. Emergency calls are bipassed by Sherrif and PCT. 4 because HPD/HFD are now seen as first responders. So the only way around this is for those neighborhoods that can, continue with the same contract constabulary service they paid for before Annexation, but..............for whatever reason, and I suspect it's turf war problems, the response times go way, way up. If you really want to see the benefits of annexation.......take a trip to Willow Brook mall. It's not Westwood yet......but it's getting there fast.

Having said all that I don't have a dog in this hunt; I only live in Spring because the house is paid for and with only a few work years left there's little reason to move. Upon retirement, we'll sell the place and move permanently to the Hill country. My hope and prayer for those of you who live in COH is that one day, maybe, (but I won't hold my breath), you'll get a Mayor that will see services as a priority and not a problem.

Services are a priority... especially for the current mayor. But the problem is that everyone in Texas is cheap and they want something for nothing. If we want more policemen, better roads, more frequent and reliable transit etc., the city has to make more money. The only way for the city to make more money is for us to pay higher taxes. HPD is severly under-staffed, and they're not about to go and find more officers until we start footing some of these bills. I wish we were paying higher in sales tax or something... as long as the money is put to good use.

Edited by totheskies
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Services are a priority... especially for the current mayor. But the problem is that everyone in Texas is cheap and they want something for nothing. If we want more policemen, better roads, more frequent and reliable transit etc., the city has to make more money. The only way for the city to make more money is for us to pay higher taxes. HPD is severly under-staffed, and they're not about to go and find more officers until we start footing some of these bills. I wish we were paying higher in sales tax or something... as long as the money is put to good use.

Well IF my aunt had balls, she'd be my uncle. The problem is money is rarely allocated for public services and when it is, it is not sufficient to keep up with the influx of residents (140,000 new people in 2009 alone). Rather, they want to build ANOTHER stadium for a soccer team that few in this city care about (relative to baseball or football--this is not a jab at soccer).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard over the weekend that ExxonMobil will not be moving the corporate headquarters to Houston but that this new campus will bring a very significant number of ExxonMobil employees into Houston from outside of Texas. The numbers I heard were much larger than I expected. This is great news for Houston.

Was hoping for ExxonMobil to return to Houston. Would have been nice (and still seems to be a possibility). I can see why they wouldn't want to move though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

.......a little bird told me that a staging area for construction is built with a large crane in place at the proposed exxon location. could this be something other than what we think?

Anyone on HAIF have a helicopter they could use to go scope this out? :P I'm sure it's not visible from the freeway if true, I know I have not seen any activity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the idea is for the Coventry development to serve as sort of a company town for Exxon? Gee.. :huh:

That's speculation but it is odd that they chose this track of land to build on--conviently located behind the Exxon campus. If it's not a part of it, they certainly plan on capitalizing on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some articles about the move/expansion:

http://frontburner.d...ying-in-irving/

I wouldn't completely rule out an HQ move, though it is unlikely. A new shiny corporate campus, with an entire master-planned community (and VERY nice one at that) built right behind it? That may entice a move from Irving, where there are hardly any Exxon employees compared to Houston.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't completely rule out an HQ move, though it is unlikely. A new shiny corporate campus, with an entire master-planned community (and VERY nice one at that) built right behind it? That may entice a move from Irving, where there are hardly any Exxon employees compared to Houston.

Yes but the Irving employees are mostly top management, and the rank & file here would be very uncomfortable with them looking over their shoulders. Lots of political implications.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bummer. now it looks like DFW's fortune 500 list is equal to or even may surpaass ours. We just lost Continential. It's looking like a dark time for Houston!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exxon has a MUCH larger presence in Houston than it does in DFW. The headquarters would have been a nice feather in our cap, but unless Exxon releases that its 27,000 Houston employees (out of 82,000 employees worldwide) from the Upstream Division Headquarters (provides about 70% of operating revenue per year for the company) are moving out of town, then this is no big deal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The likelihood of Exxonmobil moving it's corporate HQ from Dallas to Houston as part of the proposed campus has always been slim to nil. This doesnt have any bearing to the proposed campus just south of the woodlands which has always been reported to be primarily for the upstream portions of the company. The spring/woodlands campus is still being studied with no official word.

The recent reports of a housing subdivision being built in the vicinity of or next to the proposed campus is interesting. Various newsclips suggest uncertainty about who is actually building the reported subdivision. With Exxon's desire for security cited as one of the reasons for the proposed site on a large piece of undeveloped land, having a large housing subdivision right next to it wouldnt be ideal.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or quite the opposite...perhaps it was scrapped because Springwoods Village intentionally chose that location because word was leaked about the Exxon Campus going in at that location. I bet they tried to capitalize on it, like The Woodlands, to have a fortune 500 company in its 'downtown' area. I wonder if that would have scared Exxon away?

Edited by wxman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or quite the opposite...perhaps it was scrapped because Springwoods Village intentionally chose that location because word was leaked about the Exxon Campus going in at that location. I bet they tried to capitalize on it, like The Woodlands, to have a fortune 500 company in its 'downtown' area. I wonder if that would have scared Exxon away?

completely misleading post... nothing is said of the consolidation and campus near the woodlands being scrapped, only that the official XOM HQ would not be moving here. the 4M SF (or whatever # it is now) campus is happening, it just won't be XOM HQ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The recent reports of a housing subdivision being built in the vicinity of or next to the proposed campus is interesting. Various newsclips suggest uncertainty about who is actually building the reported subdivision. With Exxon's desire for security cited as one of the reasons for the proposed site on a large piece of undeveloped land, having a large housing subdivision right next to it wouldnt be ideal.

The proposed development is more like an 'edge city' than a subdivision. And considering that the actual site of the XOM campus is about 400 acres, that's plenty enough to provide for adequate security, future growth potentials, and to integrate access to the mixed-use area as an amenity. I'd be surprised if the announcement of Springwoods Village wasn't an overt attempt to sway XOM to decide in favor of the campus; I'd be positively flabbergasted if the Springwoods idea backfired.

I can't echo the sentiments of Kinkaid, zandago, and stwig enough! Plans for the XOM campus have not necessarily been scrapped. They were never made official in the first place.

Will wxman or a moderator please change the title of the thread?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

completely misleading post... nothing is said of the consolidation and campus near the woodlands being scrapped, only that the official XOM HQ would not be moving here. the 4M SF (or whatever # it is now) campus is happening, it just won't be XOM HQ.

What other campus would they be talking about? There was never previous talk of Exxon moving here until the campus near The Woodlands sprang forth. It's interesting that the HBJ publishes an article reading "Exxon changes its mind about Houston."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exxon has a MUCH larger presence in Houston than it does in DFW. The headquarters would have been a nice feather in our cap, but unless Exxon releases that its 27,000 Houston employees (out of 82,000 employees worldwide) from the Upstream Division Headquarters (provides about 70% of operating revenue per year for the company) are moving out of town, then this is no big deal.

Absolutely. I'll trade you Rex Tillerson and his 300 flying monkeys for 27,000 jobs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

completely misleading post... nothing is said of the consolidation and campus near the woodlands being scrapped, only that the official XOM HQ would not be moving here. the 4M SF (or whatever # it is now) campus is happening, it just won't be XOM HQ.

Exactly. All of Fairfax, Virginia is still moving to the new campus, as well as some other offices around Houston.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also forgot to mention that Houston is also home to Exxon Chemical.

The Irving Headquarters is really just a shell that houses some execs who appreciate being close to DFW (makes it easy for folks to come to them).

For those of you in the know, is it the same for Texaco's headquarters in New York? Is it really just a bunch of offices for show for the benefit of Wall Street, while the real work is done in Texas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • The title was changed to ExxonMobil Spring Campus

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...