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Mexico legalizes drugs.


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How long till las tiendas de cafe start popping up in every border town from Tijuana to Matamoros? At least now I can save the two grand on round trip tickets to Amsterdam when the urge kicks in.

Who needs a red light district when you've got donkey shows?

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It's hard to say if this is a good thing. It seems like a short term sol'n to a long term problem that will not end well.

I'm personally of the opinion we should use the CIA to create a peasant uprising to depose of Mexico's ruling class. They've proven to only stifle innovation and b/c of that; it is the reason we are having the illegal immigration problem in the first place.

To answer the other question, no, we shouldn't ever follow Mexico's lead on anything.

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We should start by legalizing marijuana. The only groups who are really against legalization are the drug companies, private prisons, and tightly-wound folks who are afraid they might be tempted to try it (and might like it). I'd like to see law enforcement and prisons be used for people who commit real crimes, and stop worrying about some grandmother smoking a joint to ease her glaucoma.

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Drug use in and of itself is a victimless crime...just like alcohol use.

Both can turn into a bad thing when the user lacks self-control. For that matter, Shipley's Donuts and KFC can be just as harmful to a person as drugs and alcohol.

I say legalize it, use real and honest drug education to inform the populace about the true effects of both drugs AND alcohol, and let rational adults make their own decisions...and punish them when those decisions harm others (domestic violence, DWI, theft, absenteeism, etc.)

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It's hard to say if this is a good thing. It seems like a short term sol'n to a long term problem that will not end well.

I'm personally of the opinion we should use the CIA to create a peasant uprising to depose of Mexico's ruling class. They've proven to only stifle innovation and b/c of that; it is the reason we are having the illegal immigration problem in the first place.

To answer the other question, no, we shouldn't ever follow Mexico's lead on anything.

LOL...I can't think of any examples where the CIA has successfully created a peasant uprising that has deposed anybody. Best they've been able to do is replace one dictator with another who then might stay friendly (for a while).

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LOL...I can't think of any examples where the CIA has successfully created a peasant uprising that has deposed anybody. Best they've been able to do is replace one dictator with another who then might stay friendly (for a while).

No kidding. You didn't happen to serve in the 1980s, did you? More stories about the CIA and south-of-the-border than I think most people would want to hear.

We financed the Central American and South American drug trade for years. Exactly like the heroin and opiate trade in Asia. The 'war on drugs' is an expensive farce. It is a symptom of national psychosis that we would sentence low level drug users and dealers to rot in federal pens with stiffer penalties than we give murderers and rapists.

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We financed the Central American and South American drug trade for years. Exactly like the heroin and opiate trade in Asia. The 'war on drugs' is an expensive farce.

Farce implies an intentional comedy. It's straight up effed up what we did in Central America. And for what, cheap bananas?

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The shifting economics of the marijuana trade have broad implications for Mexico's war against the drug cartels, suggesting that market forces, as much as law enforcement, can extract a heavy price from criminal organizations that have used the spectacular profits generated by pot sales to fuel the violence and corruption that plague the Mexican state.

Homegrown Pot Threatens Mexican Cartels

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Drug use in and of itself is a victimless crime...just like alcohol use.

Both can turn into a bad thing when the user lacks self-control. For that matter, Shipley's Donuts and KFC can be just as harmful to a person as drugs and alcohol.

I say legalize it, use real and honest drug education to inform the populace about the true effects of both drugs AND alcohol, and let rational adults make their own decisions...and punish them when those decisions harm others (domestic violence, DWI, theft, absenteeism, etc.)

Plus you could tax them like you do other legal drugs.

Someone's comments from cbsnews article:

The legalization of marijuana, even in limited cases such as medical use has had a great impact. It has reduced the influence, money and violence of drug cartels. It has added to State tax revenues, had reduced law enforcement and justice costs, and has allowed to some degree the allocation of State resources to more useful pursuits than jailing pot smokers.

There is a lesson to learn from this, that laws against the use of illicit drugs do not work. These laws are expensive to enforce, add to organized crime growth and the ensuing violence, and overall are a GIANT waste of our tax dollars. The time has come to legalize all of these drugs. It is better to control and tax the drugs than force it underground.

For those who favor the status quo it is time to, "get real." The laws haven't stopped anyone from using drugs. Prohibition didn't work in the 1930's and it isn't working now with drugs.

Edited by JJVilla
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There always has been, and there always will be Organized Crime in America and the rest of the world. However, it wasn't until Prohibition was passed that it became Big Business here. When prohibition was repealed, illegal drugs replaced liquor as the main source of revenue for the Mafia. If it's illegal, there's illegal (non-taxable) money to be made on it.

Drugs will never be legalized because it would put too many lawyers out of business, and Government is run by lawyers.

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I highly recommend Eric Schlosser's (Fast Food Nation) book called Reefer Madness. He has a great section on the War on Drugs, federal minimum sentencing effectively placing judicial decisons in the hands of federal prosectors, etc. It's a little outdated, in that it pre-dates the rise in the open medical-marijuana trade in California.

(The book also contains a really good, short history of the growth of the modern US porn industry.)

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Drugs were illegal in Mexico? Damn, who knew?

Haha, I was going to write the exact same thing.

I can't say this is entirely surprising to me, especially considering recent history. I don't know if I see this as being a long term legalization.

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