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What are the pros and cons of the 2 different scenarios. Lifting the current 1st level and building out another level under it (essentially making it the 1st level a 2nd level)... OR popping off the roof and building a 2nd level on the current 1st level.

Here's my thoughts on the matter.

Option 1

Pros:

Minimal structural modification to the current 1st level.

Minimum damage to original interior etc...

Cons:

Lifting the house one level (Can it be done for a reasonable $)

Option 2

Pros:

Keeping existing footprint

Cons:

Complete structural modification to existing foundation and building

Complete tear down of interior walls.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,

D

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Option 3

Demo the current house, build a brand new one. (if you really like the lot)

Option 4

Sell the current house, and move into a bigger one.

What you propose will result in a severely cut-up-mess of a house, that may actually be more expensive than Options 3 or 4 above.

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Structural system?, sq.ft.?, slab load?, ELP?, jurisdiction code?

Need moar info.

Block and Beam ... Wood Frame... 1100sqft single level... 1920s Bungalow... No slab

ELP? Not sure of the jurisdiction code? I'm in the Heights but not in the historic district. 77008.

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Don't know jack, but I if you pick #1 or #2, please keep track (with plenty of photos) of the project. It would be fun to see.

I met one guy who did it and he said that they feel more "comfortable" in the original part of the house (Which was raised) and he was glad he did it.

Of course, he didn't get into all the details about how long it took or anything, we were too busy drinking beers. the only thing that he said about it is his wife wanted to keep the original part.

You know, If momma is happy...

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I live in North Norhill and am aware of several nearby houses that had second levels added on top of the original house. I think if done right, it's a good way to add needed square footage without having to move or build a McMansion monstrosity. A few years back I looked into adding a 3rd bedroom and 2nd bath as a second floor of my house. A local contractor who did a similar job two streets over gave me an estimate of $55000. That was to basically add a few more piers under the house for extra strength, building out the existing attic with dormers on each side to add windows and a more square shape, and keeping the finishes pretty basic. The only change to the first floor was moving one non-load bearing wall to make room for a stairwell. I ended up not doing it but thought it was a very fair price for what would almost surely add that much value or more to my home. Lifting the whole house in your case sounds expensive.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thought you all might be interested in this. The pictures here are of a house on Herkimer at 14th. They are raising the house, adding a 1st floor and renovating. We shall see how much stays original but anyway thought it was interesting none the less.

P.S. Bungalow Revival is the contractor.

post-3985-12555592808777_thumb.jpg

Edited by SaintCyr
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Thought you all might be interested in this. The pictures here are of a house on Herkimer at 14th. They are raising the house, adding a 1st floor and renovating. We shall see how much stays original but anyway thought it was interesting none the less.

JENGA !!!!!

That's far out.. I've never see or heard of an entire bungalow being raised to the 2nd floor like that.

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JENGA !!!!!

That's far out.. I've never see or heard of an entire bungalow being raised to the 2nd floor like that.

Yeah I'm curious as to the cost of that vs. adding a level on top. I'm going to see if they can give me a quote on my house... Its actually pretty eerie when you are looking at it up close.

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Depends greatly on the existing structural integrity. It might very well be that to build atop your existing, conditions would require a steel balloon frame which is quite pricey. By jacking up the existing, the first floor and footings can be spec'd appropriately for the given load.

Edited by LegacyTree
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That's the second house Bungalow Revival has jacked up and added a story underneath; the other was done several years ago and is over around 4th and Harvard I think.

Most bungalows are not that wide and have a wall running down the middle. You can add engineered beams/i-joists to span between the walls and fairly easily create support for a second story, though additional piers/footings will be required underneath the house. It's not cheap, but no remodel/expansion job is.

The trick with adding a second story is ensuring you can properly locate all the utilities. A lot of "pop-top" houses end up with strangely shaped rooms as people don't want to spend the extra dough to move water/sewer as needed.

The easiest way to do is just to add a 2-story addition on the back, so the structure of the original house doesn't have to be mangled too much.

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Thought you all might be interested in this. The pictures here are of a house on Herkimer at 14th. They are raising the house, adding a 1st floor and renovating. We shall see how much stays original but anyway thought it was interesting none the less.

P.S. Bungalow Revival is the contractor.

This is like not putting your dog to sleep - when you know its time.

Do the right thing. Leave it alone or put it out of its misery.

26_CaterpillarBulldozerD11R-795078.jpg

All in one shot.

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  • 1 month later...

Just an update... Also, I don't like the way they are putting the bottom floor on... If it were mine I'd be keeping to the original footprint. my .02

When historic preservation and McMansion fantasies collide.

I suppose a comment about why one story residences should remain one story would be overkill? Stating that one story houses on stilts belong on the coast is stating the obvious? As long as they do not install vinyl clad windows, would it pass historic district muster?

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When historic preservation and McMansion fantasies collide.

I suppose a comment about why one story residences should remain one story would be overkill? Stating that one story houses on stilts belong on the coast is stating the obvious? As long as they do not install vinyl clad windows, would it pass historic district muster?

I'm a little surprised that they are doing this. However, they previously have jacked up homes for garage/garage apartments. I don't have a problem with their dabbling in this on a block with a bunch of McTorians. Also, based on the previous work they've done in demonstrating how staying on one level can be very accommodating and using salvaged materials in restoration, I give them a walk.

Full disclosure: My HAIF icon is from another house they are renovating - the brown house next door to the raised house picture above.

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But even if they do jack it up a whole story, that would mean the kitchen would be on the upper level, and no one likes carrying groceries up there, right?

Just because the kitchen was part of the old bungalow does not mean it has to remain in the upper old bungalow half of this project.

Any townhome built in Houston in the last decade most likely has the kitchen on the middle floor. It's no big deal.

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