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Houston MKT Railroad Station


gto250us

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I've had an idea for a while of getting together old pictures from all over the city and trying to recapture the same shot from the exact spot where the picture was taken to show how things have changed, this would probably be a good one to start with...

I think that's an excellent idea. I love that kind of stuff.

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I've had an idea for a while of getting together old pictures from all over the city and trying to recapture the same shot from the exact spot where the picture was taken to show how things have changed, this would probably be a good one to start with...

There's already a book for that, called Houston Then & Now, available on Amazon NEW for $14.

LINK: http://www.amazon.com/Houston-Then-Now/dp/1592231373/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1251848450&sr=8-1

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There's a newspaper article/ad on sale on Ebay for MKT Station Houston. It would not let me post the picture here.

I think I saw the same article on ebay. I really hate it when I see old books, magazines, and newspapers chopped up in an attempt to make more money off them. Here's a copy of the article(not from ebay):

3880141800_17874a8ed4_o.jpg

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There's already a book for that, called Houston Then & Now, available on Amazon NEW for $14.

LINK: http://www.amazon.com/Houston-Then-Now/dp/1592231373/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1251848450&sr=8-1

Plus JR Gonzales has a continuing Then and Now feature in his Bayou City History blog in the Chron.

Bring it on kylejack; that kind of stuff is always interesting.

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The picture seems to be shot from the other side of a bayou, though, right? Isn't that a railroad bridge crossing a bayou on the right of the picture? Is that the remains of the railroad bridge that can still be seen?

Edit: The red arrow is where I propose that the photographer was, and the direction he shot. Sorry if that was unclear.

Edited by kylejack
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There does appear to be a bridge still there, crossing the bayou, under 1-10. I used maps.live.com and rotated the Birdseye view. The train station appears to be behind the top watermark on the original B&W photo. Notice the bend in Main St. The current parking lot does indeed appear to be the site where it once stood.

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What's that big acordian looking think on top of the UHDT building in post #2?

I was wondering about that, as well. My First thought too, was that it was probably part of an a/c unit. What a great pic of UH - DT & train station. I got to see UH-DT recently. They did a good job of restoring it. The patio is awesome.

I could see bayou water flowing over that old bridge, at times. How interesting.

Edited by NenaE
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  • 2 years later...

You could also check to see if your local branch for either Houston or Harris Cnty library systems have a copy. Save yourself $14 during these economic hard times.

There's already a book for that, called Houston Then & Now, available on Amazon NEW for $14.

LINK: http://www.amazon.com/Houston-Then-Now/dp/1592231373/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1251848450&sr=8-1

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I was wondering about that, as well. My First thought too, was that it was probably part of an a/c unit. What a great pic of UH - DT & train station. I got to see UH-DT recently. They did a good job of restoring it. The patio is awesome.

I could see bayou water flowing over that old bridge, at times. How interesting.

You are correct, the item on top of the building is an evaporative cooling unit, an early attempt at air conditioning. Refigeration units eventually replaced most of these water cooled systems around town.

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  • 2 years later...

I'm posting this picture of the demolition of the MKT depot in 1958. I now live in Smithville and this town had the largest rail yard between Houston and Waco. The MKT was the life blood of this town for many years. When MKT was sold to Union Pacific the operation here was scaled down drastically. I know many former MKT employees here and they can tell some great stories about the MKT. My neighbor's grandfather was an engineer for the MKT and had the honor of taking the last passenger train, the KATY Flyer from here to Houston.

 

  

post-11998-0-68565000-1395591706_thumb.j

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