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Blue Ridge Mountain

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That gonna-be-178-ft.-high pile of trash going up across the street from Shadow Creek Ranch? Nothing a little smart landscaping can't handle. Rice architecture grad student Lysle Oliveros's proposal for the Blue Ridge Landfill makes for a rockin' video. And Houston needs a mountain, anyway.

http://swamplot.com/garbage-playground-dev...05-12/#comments

Video with renderings here:

http://vimeo.com/4384401

Does anyone know more about this?

Edited by UpuPUp!
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Blue Ridge?? That's insulting to NC. I like Houston and everything, but can't they come up with an original name rather than copping a name from one of the most beautiful ranges in the country?

Amen...I propose we name it "L.A.", in honor of the Lakers.

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This topic is about a proposal to turn the landfill into a Mountain, That topic you posted is about the proposed landfill expansion.

Edited by UpuPUp!

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Blue Ridge?? That's insulting to NC. I like Houston and everything, but can't they come up with an original name rather than copping a name from one of the most beautiful ranges in the country?

The Blue Ridge name is relevant to the area. Our office is down there and we do volunteer stuff for Blue Ridge Elementary - not sure if there are other things called Blue Ridge.

This topic is about a proposal to turn the landfill into a Mountain, That topic you posted is about the proposed landfill expansion.

There's a difference.

Ok...RELATED topic, not duplicate.

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The Blue Ridge name is relevant to the area. Our office is down there and we do volunteer stuff for Blue Ridge Elementary - not sure if there are other things called Blue Ridge.

Ok...RELATED topic, not duplicate.

The Blue Ridge Prison Farm was located there also.

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Where the heck is Shadow Creek Ranch?????

I believe it is in Pearland.

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The Blue Ridge name is relevant to the area. Our office is down there and we do volunteer stuff for Blue Ridge Elementary - not sure if there are other things called Blue Ridge.

There's also a good-sized antenna farm out there.

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I believe it is in Pearland.

West of Pearland. So, just outside of nothing, next to the mud between the chinese tallow trees.

There's also a good-sized antenna farm out there.

Is it called the Blue Ridge antenna farm? Yeah that is my favorite thing down here. All kinds of fun blinking lights and awesome signal/reception.

Google says there's a couple of churches and a park named Blue Ridge.

Edited by 20thStDad

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West of Pearland. So, just outside of nothing, next to the mud between the chinese tallow trees.

Is it called the Blue Ridge antenna farm? Yeah that is my favorite thing down here. All kinds of fun blinking lights and awesome signal/reception.

Google says there's a couple of churches and a park named Blue Ridge.

It sounds like it's in the middle of nowhere...

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I always thought those antennae were in Stafford. So, in essence, this landfill will be between Pearland and Stafford. Oh great, a nice southerly breeze will bring its funk right over the city.

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I can see one of these mountains northeast of downtown. Looking at maps.live, it is north of Beaumont Hwy 90, east of John Ralston/Greens Bayou and south of Ley. This appears to still be in "production". I wonder if there are plans for it one day. Houston, we have a mountain.

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West of Pearland. So, just outside of nothing, next to the mud between the chinese tallow trees.

Is it called the Blue Ridge antenna farm? Yeah that is my favorite thing down here. All kinds of fun blinking lights and awesome signal/reception.

Google says there's a couple of churches and a park named Blue Ridge.

I vaguely recall having seen a reference to that somewhere on an obscure map a long time ago. Just browsing through aerial photos, I count eight antenna towers which are situated only a little southwest of the Blue Ridge School, and on both sides of the Fort Bend Toll Road.

And scanning through USGS topo maps, I can see that Blue Ridge gets its name because there's a hill that peaks out at a 94-foot elevation at the intersection of McHard Rd. (FM 2334) and Moffitt Ln. It looks to be about 15 to 20 feet above the mean elevation of the rest of that part of Fort Bend County. Given the enormous concentration of oil and gas rigs out there in what is labeled on the map as the Blue Ridge Oil Field, I'm guessing with a fair bit of confidence that the protrusion is a salt dome. And actually, given that that area is probably so environmentally contaminated already that the big landowners wouldn't dare allow future residential development on it for fear of getting slapped with a liability suit, it strikes me that this is an ideal place for a landfill or other 'dirty' industry. Bring it on.

Edited by TheNiche

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It sounds like it's in the middle of nowhere...

We actually have several places in our region that are like this. One is the Pierce Junction area, just south of 610, and there are another couple of spots located off of the Gulf Freeway in between Pasadena and Clear Lake City.

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Landfills stink -- even after they're closed. What are they going to do with the landfill gas collection system? Have all of the gas wells go to a piping system, then cover THAT with grass, then burn the gas 1/2 mile away?

Landfills sink too. A landfill can settle anywhere from 10-30% depending on what kind of waste it had and how the landfill was operated. How will they build anything on top of this hill?

It seems more graphic design than engineering.

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Landfills stink -- even after they're closed. What are they going to do with the landfill gas collection system? Have all of the gas wells go to a piping system, then cover THAT with grass, then burn the gas 1/2 mile away?

Landfills sink too. A landfill can settle anywhere from 10-30% depending on what kind of waste it had and how the landfill was operated. How will they build anything on top of this hill?

It seems more graphic design than engineering.

Ever heard of Wildcat Golf Club? It was a former landfill that has been converted into a golf course. Makes for some of the best views of Houston's skylines that there ever were, and it doesn't stink. Somehow, they even managed to build a club house on it.

EDIT: But you're right, the concept shown on Swamplot is just an architecture student's class project or something, not a serious proposal. Never mistake an architect for an engineer, or vice versa.

Edited by TheNiche

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What are they going to do with the landfill gas collection system? Have all of the gas wells go to a piping system, then cover THAT with grass, then burn the gas 1/2 mile away?

I'm aware of a company that's collecting the landfill gas and piping it to the vicinity of Texas City to provide additional power to refineries. I believe the gas being collected is from the landfills next to Shadow Creek Ranch.

Pretty good use of this "resource" if you ask me.

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Ever heard of Wildcat Golf Club? It was a former landfill that has been converted into a golf course. Makes for some of the best views of Houston's skylines that there ever were, and it doesn't stink. Somehow, they even managed to build a club house on it.

EDIT: But you're right, the concept shown on Swamplot is just an architecture student's class project or something, not a serious proposal. Never mistake an architect for an engineer, or vice versa.

So that whole video is just a thesis and not really going to happen? This would be a sweet project.

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So that whole video is just a thesis and not really going to happen? This would be a sweet project.

If this were really a going concern, there would've been a concerted marketing campaign. We wouldn't have heard about it this way. And typically the folks that put those together don't get any personal "on-air" recognition for it.

That's not to say that the landfill isn't going to happen, just that the concepts proposed in the video aren't part of that.

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And scanning through USGS topo maps, I can see that Blue Ridge gets its name because there's a hill that peaks out at a 94-foot elevation at the intersection of McHard Rd. (FM 2334) and Moffitt Ln. It looks to be about 15 to 20 feet above the mean elevation of the rest of that part of Fort Bend County.

As flat as Houston is, I always thought that natural rise was a little weird. I mean, you're driving up a hill in a pasture with the Williams nee Transco Tower in plain view to your north, that always seemed a little odd as I would expect a rise like that on a rural wooded road in Waller County. You usually don't see hills like those in any real frequency until you get about 25-30 miles north of town. I guess that's probably the only natural hill in the Houston City Limits, right?

Edited by JLWM8609
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As flat as Houston is, I always thought that natural rise was a little weird. I mean, you're driving up a hill in a pasture with the Williams nee Transco Tower in plain view to your north, that always seemed a little odd as I would expect a rise like that on a rural wooded road in Waller County. You usually don't see hills like those in any real frequency until you get about 25-30 miles north of town. I guess that's probably the only natural hill in the Houston City Limits, right?

Nope, it's not in the Houston city limits. It's either unincorporated or it might possibly be Missouri City.

I can think of about a dozen salt domes in our metro area. Basically, if you just think about the places where we have large oilfields or where Friendswood Development Corp. (a former subsidiary of Exxon) developed master planned communities such as Friendswood, Clear Lake, or Kingwood, you can figure out where a number of these are located pretty quickly.

Probably the easiest to physically observe is High Island.

EDIT: I found a map of salt domes along the Texas coastal plain, and I count 24 of them in our MSA. I don't think that this map is conclusive, however, because it leaves off several of the ones that I know exist in southeast Harris County. There are probably another half dozen...maybe more.

Edited by TheNiche

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Is it called the Blue Ridge antenna farm? Yeah that is my favorite thing down here. All kinds of fun blinking lights and awesome signal/reception.

The first tower was a candelabra for 2 and 11 a mile or so west of the old 288. In 1980, Senior Road Tower Group was formed by 8 FMs stuck on Shell and Tenneco downtown to build a master antenna so they could escape the ever-growing Houston skyline.

The original location of SRTG was Dewalt, TX, and I think the address of the earlier tower was also given as Dewalt which was near the intersection of 6 and FM 1092. Dewalt has since been absorbed by Missouri City and several other towers have been added.

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If this were really a going concern, there would've been a concerted marketing campaign. We wouldn't have heard about it this way. And typically the folks that put those together don't get any personal "on-air" recognition for it.

That's not to say that the landfill isn't going to happen, just that the concepts proposed in the video aren't part of that.

I guess if anything, some entrepenuer might see this and have the guts to go through with it. Or actually...what kind of person/people would actually do this anyway? Would a landfill company be the only type of people that would undertake this? How else could you make money from it?

...thinking out loud

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I guess if anything, some entrepenuer might see this and have the guts to go through with it. Or actually...what kind of person/people would actually do this anyway? Would a landfill company be the only type of people that would undertake this? How else could you make money from it?

...thinking out loud

The landscaping concept works if and only if the City of Pearland or the Shadow Creek Ranch HOA at least agreed to provide all funding and to drop any lawsuits that they might've been planning and to endorse the project. I'm pretty confident that that would do the trick.

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I dunno... I think a mountain created out of trash would be a constant reminder for all the Shadow Creek residents that they are living next door to a... well... a mountain of trash, the largest mountain of trash in the US in fact.

Definitely wouldn't make me want to start a family there.

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Nope, it's not in the Houston city limits. It's either unincorporated or it might possibly be Missouri City.

I think it is in the city limits, maybe just on the extreme edge. The intersection of McHard Road and Moffit Rd. at the crest of the hill has City of Houston installed green and white street signage. Mo City has those red white and blue signs.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source...2,262.15,,0,0.5

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source...,306.74,,0,6.65

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Ok, at first, this project had some degree of feasibility. Now, it's just out there....

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this totally sounds like one of the dumbest ideas ive ever heard of in my life haha

I absolutely love this idea. I doubt it, but I really wish someone would pursue this project.

This is what the wiki said about Mount TrashMore:

Since its opening in the 1970s, it ranks as the most popular park in Virginia Beach, with attendance of over one million visitors a year.[

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Damn. i thought this thing was a real proposal. all it is is a student's dream.

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We actually have several places in our region that are like this. One is the Pierce Junction area, just south of 610, and there are another couple of spots located off of the Gulf Freeway in between Pasadena and Clear Lake City.

I believe that the Pierce Junction Oilfield/Salt Dome was turned into the Wildcat Golf Course.

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On 5/13/2009 at 1:29 PM, TheNiche said:

There's also a good-sized antenna farm out there.

 

Anyone know the height of the KRIV tower? Is it similar the Senior Road Tower at near 2,000 feet? I was driving down McHard road and noticed a supertall tower.

 

C7w2Zer.jpg

 

On satellite

 

UStUIMc.png

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1 hour ago, Highrise Tower said:

 

Anyone know the height of the KRIV tower? Is it similar the Senior Road Tower at near 2,000 feet? I was driving down McHard road and noticed a supertall tower.

 

C7w2Zer.jpg

 

On satellite

 

UStUIMc.png

 

1,962 feet

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https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Professionalism/Collapse_of_the_TV_Antenna_in_Missouri_City,_Texas

http://www.gendisasters.com/texas/14733/missouri-city-tx-television-tower-collapse-dec-1982

Missouri City, TX Television Tower Collapse, Dec 1982

TOWER COLLAPSE HURLS 5 MEN TO THEIR DEATH.

Missouri City (AP) -- An 1,800 foot tall television tower toppled as workers were lifting an antenna onto its pinnacle Tuesday, hurling five men to their deaths. Three others on the ground were injured.
The dead had been working on the antenna as it was being lifted atop the tower, said Lt. Roger Boyd of the Fort Bend Sheriff's Department in this suburb southwest of Houston.
Bill Cordell, chief engineer for KIKK, one of the radio stations scheduled to use the tower, said the workers had lifted one antenna atop the tower and were lifting a second when a gin pole being used as part of the lifting mechanism failed, causing the antenna to fall and sever a guy wire.
Andy Hudack, an engineer on the project, recorded the accident on videotape. The only sounds heard on the tape were his anguished,
"Oh, my God" and several seconds of the roaring collapse.
"I heard something snap," he said later. "Then the tower started falling. I just put my gear down rather hastily and got out of the way."
The falling tower crushed a building belonging to independent television station KTXH Channel 29.
Hours after the accident the tower lay in a mass of twisted metal, with cable the size of a man's wrist stretching for hundreds of yards from the wreckage.
The victims "were all killed by multiple injuries ..
They were all in bad shape," said Peace Justice L. F. Eguia. "You've got to remember, they were riding this thing down."
Three Houston men who were working atop another building near the tower were injured when they leaped or were thrown from a second-story roof.
Cordell said the victims were employed by Worldwide Tower Service Inc. of Pitman, N.J.
Killed were:
GENE CROSBY, 24, of North Carolina.
DAVID STEWART, 27, of North Carolina.
DONALD K. OWENS, 21, of Mississippi.
JOHNNIE WILSON, about 26, of South Carolina.
JOHNNIE BRATTEN, 26, of South Carolina, said A. J. Noto, dispatcher for the Fort Bend County Sheriff's Department.
Of the injured, J. L. CHAPMAN, 52, was to undergo surgery for multiple fractures at Hermann Hospital today, while JAMES MYER, 31, was treated for multiple contusions and released and CARL SMITH, 23, was in stable condition with a broken pelvis, hospital spokesmen said.
The tower was operated by the Senior Road Tower Project, a consortium of KTXH-TV and several radio stations.
The mast was in the final stages of construction
and workers had been doing tests and installations on it, officials said.

Galveston Daily News Texas 1982-12-08

 

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On 5/13/2009 at 5:10 PM, TheNiche said:

And scanning through USGS topo maps, I can see that Blue Ridge gets its name because there's a hill that peaks out at a 94-foot elevation at the intersection of McHard Rd. (FM 2334) and Moffitt Ln. It looks to be about 15 to 20 feet above the mean elevation of the rest of that part of Fort Bend County. Given the enormous concentration of oil and gas rigs out there in what is labeled on the map as the Blue Ridge Oil Field, I'm guessing with a fair bit of confidence that the protrusion is a salt dome. And actually, given that that area is probably so environmentally contaminated already that the big landowners wouldn't dare allow future residential development on it for fear of getting slapped with a liability suit, it strikes me that this is an ideal place for a landfill or other 'dirty' industry. Bring it on.

 

Old oil fields a new twist for Petrosearch

https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/stories/2004/02/09/story4.html

 

Quote

 

Kelly Erwin is doing what he loves: Drilling for oil. And he's hitting black gold in an 80-year-old oil field in Fort Bend County that has sat abandoned for a decade.

 

To drill the Blue Ridge salt dome field that straddles the Fort Bend/Harris County line along McHard Road, Erwin has teamed up with Petrosearch Corp., the brainchild of Houston oil and gas entrepreneur Brad Simmons.

 

Simmons started Petrosearch in 2002. Following a reverse merger with investment firm Texas Commercial Resources Inc., Petrosearch officially became a public company last month, trading over the counter on the pink sheets.

 

Petrosearch aims to develop some of the thousands of old but still potentially profitable oil and gas properties in the U.S. that have been left behind by the major oil companies. Many of them are in the hands of small independent producers, but financing such independent operations is often prohibitive.

 

Fort Bend's Blue Ridge was discovered in the early 1920s by Gulf Oil Corp. But low oil prices soon led to abandonment, despite the fact that some of the wells in the field were producing 1,000 barrels of oil a day.

 

In fact, Erwin says, one of the wells he is drilling now had been drilled down to 3,200 feet in 1926 when a boulder rolled into the hole and burned up the boiler. Gulf Oil abandoned it, and it has not been drilled since.

 

Erwin has estimated the oil reserves under his first well at potentially 70,000 barrels, and TK Petrosearch has five to 10 more pay zones to drill on the land and leases it currently owns.

 

 

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I grew up in the area - my neighborhood was across the street from the oil fields. They wanted to build an apartment complex on the corner of FB parkway and 2234 which would be on the field

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