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The Allen: Allen Parkway/Gillette Mixed-Use 6-Acres


jmontrose

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This is one, in a series of sculptural works by John Runnels, commissioned by Buffalo Bayou Conservancy .

Every stairway that leads down to the bayou has one. He and Charlie Sartwelle are the founders and owners of Mother Dog Studio, situated in the heart of the Genesis project area. Which hopefully will become an island north of downtown.

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6 minutes ago, bobruss said:

This is one, in a series of sculptural works by John Runnels, commissioned by Buffalo Bayou Conservancy .

Every stairway that leads down to the bayou has one. He and Charlie Sartwelle are the founders and owners of Mother Dog Studio, situated in the heart of the Genesis project area. Which hopefully will become an island north of downtown.

I bought a painting at one of the Art Crawls years ago and he framed it for me.

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Disagree. Two towers gained a few floors and the tallest tower became a little less funky. And the pedestrian bridge *which was always a bit gimmicky* went away. As value engineering goes, this is not bad at all.

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I'll withhold judgement until it's complete, but does anyone else feel the glass on the Pavilion building seems really cheap and does not look that great? I run  BBP a few times a week and always notice it.  I hope I'm wrong, but have never seen it mentioned on this thread and am curious if I'm the not the only one in this camp.

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2 hours ago, Texasota said:

Disagree. Two towers gained a few floors and the tallest tower became a little less funky. And the pedestrian bridge *which was always a bit gimmicky* went away. As value engineering goes, this is not bad at all.

The rest of the buildings are improved but I liked how the tallest tower was twisted and had more floors.

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On 6/11/2021 at 7:58 AM, Texasota said:

Disagree. Two towers gained a few floors and the tallest tower became a little less funky. And the pedestrian bridge *which was always a bit gimmicky* went away. As value engineering goes, this is not bad at all.

Also people don't know how much pedestrian bridges cost. That bridge alone in the original renders alone would have cost at least $1 million. They aren't cheap. Then the city gets involved for easements, then the parks and rec department get involved, then a host of new code requirements come up, etc... Why bother. After the Allen Parkway redevelopment a couple years ago its a much better walking environment anyway, and an existing pedestrian bridge is like a 5-10min walk further south.

Edited by Luminare
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2 minutes ago, Luminare said:

Also people don't know how much pedestrian bridges cost. That bridge alone in the original renders alone would have cost at least $1 million. They aren't cheap. Then the city gets involved for easements, then the parks and rec department get involved, then a host of new code requirements come up, etc... Why bother. After the Allen Parkway redevelopment a couple years ago its a much better walking environment anyway, and an existing pedestrian bridge is like a 5-10min walk further south.

east, but yeah, I imagine it was a 'hey, we're going to build this walking bridge'. then everyone came out and threw all sorts of expectations, and other requirements, then they just kind of backed out of the idea.

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On 6/11/2021 at 9:55 AM, CREguy13 said:

I'll withhold judgement until it's complete, but does anyone else feel the glass on the Pavilion building seems really cheap and does not look that great? I run  BBP a few times a week and always notice it.  I hope I'm wrong, but have never seen it mentioned on this thread and am curious if I'm the not the only one in this camp.

Aesthetically that's up for conversation. I should take a look at this next time I'm in town, but FYI, getting metal panel manufactured in that specific way, in pieces as large as that, and designed the way it is...ain't cheap. I wonder if they will give it a good buff finish at the end. Will have to see.

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Just now, samagon said:

east, but yeah, I imagine it was a 'hey, we're going to build this walking bridge'. then everyone came out and threw all sorts of expectations, and other requirements, then they just kind of backed out of the idea.

Thats what you get when you been out of Houston this long, the first to go is direction haha. Appreciate the rebound.

It probably wasn't even other people. I imagine it was explored at some point in the design process. Why not right? But like most things the devil is in the detail, and upon further code anaylsis, research into stakeholders that would have to be involved, the engineer who was like...really? are you sure, etc... Permitting would have been a pain. Who knows whether it was a client idea or architect idea too.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/26/2021 at 12:55 PM, pacarlson said:

Thank you much TheSirDingle.

 

4 apartment towers currently under construction in Houston >= 400':

Brava (The Preston) - 549' (Almost topped out)

The Allen - 496' (Frame assembly)

Block 98 Residential Tower - 468' (Frame assembly)

Aspire Post Oak - 453' (Topped out)

 

7 apartment towers completed in Houston since 2015 >= 400:

2929 Weslayan  - 533' (2015)

Market Square Tower - 498' (2017)

The Post Oak - 490' (2018)

Hanover River Oaks - 462' (2020)

Residences at La Colombe d'Or - 452' (2020)

Latitude Medical Center - 423' (2018)

Arabella - 400' (2018)

 

To keep this in perspective; in 1960, Houston had only 2 buildings total >=400' and a population of 938,219.  Both of those were built before 1930.  Depending on which source you use, Houston currently has 64 built plus 4 under construction >=400' (68 total).

5 under construction (you left out Texas Tower)

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

Yeah, I know that.  But the post to which I responded was counting up the total of all buildings (not just residential) over 400'

Shouldn’t 609 Main be included as well…?  🤔 

Edited by arche_757
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8 minutes ago, arche_757 said:

Shouldn’t 609 Main be included as well…?  🤔 

Well, I presume 609 would be included the pacarlson's count of 64 existing buildings taller than 400'.  609 is an existing building (not currently under construction)).

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Yes.  I was wondering that, but the list called out buildings taller than 400’ post-2015 onward and it was not included.  And I think 609 would be one of the only commercial towers built in that time frame aside from Texas Tower that is 400’+, BG Group was pre-‘15, and only BHP Tower would be close to that threshold if I’m not mistaken?  
 

Wasn’t certain.  Maybe I missed the forest for the trees?

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56 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

Yeah, I know that.  But the post to which I responded was counting up the total of all buildings (not just residential) over 400'

The post said "apartment towers under construction."

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, MidCenturyMoldy said:

The post said "apartment towers under construction."

Yes, but then it states that in 1960 Houston had 2 buildings.  Neither were apartments/residential buildings.  Also, the other  60+ buildings aren’t all residential.  So the assumption was @pacarlson was also mentioning ALL buildings over 400’ ?

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It's very important that this argument continue as long as possible. Never mind replies - can we make it take up multiple pages of a topic about a genuinely interesting multi-tower development currently under active construction?

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14 hours ago, arche_757 said:

Yes, but then it states that in 1960 Houston had 2 buildings.  Neither were apartments/residential buildings.  Also, the other  60+ buildings aren’t all residential.  So the assumption was @pacarlson was also mentioning ALL buildings over 400’ ?

seems like there are 3 individual statements.

the number of residential buildings >400' currently under construction.

the number of residential buildings >400' that were under construction from 2015 to current.

perspective for any building >400' in Houston.

then at the end of the final statement, only the residential buildings currently under construction are included, when the statement seemed to be about any building >400'.

anyway, point taken is that Houston has grown a lot over the previous 60 years, irrespective of what currently being built building might have been left out of the count.

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