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29 minutes ago, samagon said:

a lot of what is making midtown what it is is because of the light rail, it's not a stretch to assume that the other light rail corridors will be well along the similar path towards urban areas within 15 or so years, Harrisburg will probably lead this charge, as you mention, EaDo is already moving down that path.

 

And this is why University line being BRT is disappointing...  Everyone knows LRT attracts better development but the cost to build is higher than it should be.

13 minutes ago, clutchcity94 said:


what’s the odd area between midtown and the museum district? I’m trying to picture it.

 

It's forever Third Ward...well according to some people on the internet.

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6/27

Octagonal shape footings for foundation, three done and many more to finish.

From Jamail Skate Park.

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1 hour ago, samagon said:

 

as much a street grid as anywhere in this town, and more walk-able than most.

 

  

 

add heights, the odd area between midtown and the museum district, rice village area as areas that can become this.

 

pretty much all of Houston that was built prior to the early/mid 60s is a full on street grid, and depending on how spicy developers get, they can very easily morph into urban areas. 

 

a lot of what is making midtown what it is is because of the light rail, it's not a stretch to assume that the other light rail corridors will be well along the similar path towards urban areas within 15 or so years, Harrisburg will probably lead this charge, as you mention, EaDo is already moving down that path.

 

I probably should have clarified, when I said it wasn't a "real" street grid, that although the streets may be gridded, there's a hierarchy of uses where commercial uses are almost exclusively located on the major thoroughfares, with residential uses elsewhere. This is the "commercial spine" model of development that characterizes most suburbs in the world. As opposed to the more egalitarian use pattern of downtown and midtown, where any use can be on any street. The neighborhood I grew up in in Spring had a street grid, but not one in the urban sense.

 

Edited by H-Town Man
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I don't really think it's useful to use "urban" as a shorthand at this point; it has too broad a range of meanings. 

 

In terms of a hierarchy of uses, Montrose is actually pretty close to a traditional urban neighborhood, with most retail on major corridors and a few minor examples scattered around (particularly at intersections.) I am genuinely curious how you would interpret neighborhoods with a similar hierarchy in more conventionally "urban" cities, like most rowhouse neighborhoods in DC, Philadelphia, etc. Are Fishtown or Capital Hill not "urban" because they have a hierarchy of uses?

 

Your definition really only applies to narrow sections of most cities - Center City Philly (narrowly defined), Downtown DC (which has relatively little residential).

 

One of the big differences in post-war American suburbs is that the number of commercial corridors is far fewer. Montrose is what, maybe two miles between the bayou and 59? Over that distance, you have the following east-west commercial corridors:

  • W Dallas
  • W Gray
  • Fairview (off and on)
  • Westheimer
  • W Alabama
  • Richmond

So yes, concentration on corridors, but at least one corridor is always less than a 5 minute walk away. 

 

As opposed to, for example, Cypress Creek Parkway. The nearest parallel commercial corridor is miles away for much of its length. Plus, even just *crossing* Cypress Creek Parkway is a nightmare compared to Westheimer or even Richmond. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Texasota said:

I am genuinely curious how you would interpret neighborhoods with a similar hierarchy in more conventionally "urban" cities, like most rowhouse neighborhoods in DC, Philadelphia, etc. Are Fishtown or Capital Hill not "urban" because they have a hierarchy of uses?

 

 

Semi-urban, which is different from suburban. Urban usually means lots of people walking around. In those neighborhoods, there's only lots of people walking on the major thoroughfares. The residential streets just have the stray walker going to or from the thoroughfares.

 

The French Quarter is urban, the Garden District is semi-urban.

 

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9 hours ago, cityliving said:

I wonder how they do it to weave all those metal wires together like a basket? Looks very complicated.

 

Much of it can be done on the ground or even off-site then it is craned into place like a big woven steel blanket but the "blankets" need to be tied or welded together. It is tedious but the pros make it look easy.

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DC Partners Targets Mid-2021 For Opening Of The Allen Lifestyle Pavilion

 

Construction of The Allen, a $500M mixed-use development overlooking Buffalo Bayou Park near Downtown Houston, is well underway.

The project, situated on 6 acres at the southeast corner of Allen Parkway and Gillette Street, broke ground in November. Eventually, the site will hold a 34-story tower with 99 luxury condominiums and a 170-room hotel.

A lifestyle pavilion is also planned for the property and will be the first part of the project to deliver in 2021.

 

tR1s0xQ.png

 

Developer DC Partners CEO Roberto Contreras told Bisnow that the main construction of The Allen Lifestyle Pavilion will be completed by the first quarter of 2021, and tenant build-outs will then commence. The pavilion is expected to open to the public in Q3 2021.

The 62.1K SF building will include retail and a ground-floor restaurant with a patio overlooking Buffalo Bayou Park, a two-story fitness club, and a rooftop restaurant and lounge area with views of Downtown Houston. The pavilion was 80% pre-leased prior to construction, and leasing for the remaining space is underway.

Completion of the hotel and residential tower will take longer. That part of the development is slated for completion in the first half of 2023, the developer confirmed.

The Allen is the first mixed-use project in Houston that features both condominiums and a hotel since the Four Seasons hotel in Downtown Houston was completed in 1982. The hotel will be overseen by Thompson Hotels, a boutique subsidiary company of Hyatt Corp. The Thompson Houston hotel will occupy floors 1-15 of the tower, while condos will fill floors 16-34.

By building The Residences at The Allen, DC Partners is aiming to cater to the underserved luxury condo segment of the market in Houston. The company told Bisnow that so far, 20% of units have been sold, mostly to Houston-based buyers. One-bedroom condos start at $563K, while penthouses start at $2.4M.

The Allen is one of several new infill developments underway in the Buffalo Bayou/Montrose area that are expecting to bring further residential and retail density to the already-popular inner-Houston neighborhood.

The site includes a 2.9K SF sales center, which showcases two full-scale kitchens, two bathrooms and a walk-in closet. Customers are able to do walk-throughs of prospective condos using virtual reality software and select custom finishes from an array of samples.

G.T. Leach Construction is the general contractor for the development. HOK led the site plan and architecture, while interiors for the hotel and the condos were designed by Abel Design Group. TQ RED and Westmont Hospitality Group are investors in the project.

Contact Christie Moffat at christie.moffat@bisnow.com
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The Allen high-rise project marks construction milestones

 

The $500 million mixed-use project The Allen has marked two construction milestones: completion of the foundation core for its hotel-condo high-rise and the topping-out of its lifestyle pavilion, developers DC Partners announced Oct. 9.

The four-level, 62,000-square-foot pavilion is scheduled be ready for tenant move-in by the first quarter of 2021, while the high-rise is expected in 2023.

 

The pavilion is 80% leased, according to the news release, and will include a fitness club; rooftop dining with views of Buffalo Bayou Park; and retail and restaurant spaces. 

The Thompson Hotel will take up the first 15 floors of the high-rise, and The Residences at The Allen will take up floors 16 through 35, offering 99 condominium residences, 17 penthouses and a rooftop helipad "engineered to accommodate drone deliveries and transportation of the future," according to the developer.

The residences are 20% pre-sold, according to DC Partners.

 

https://communityimpact.com/houston/heights-river-oaks-montrose/development/2020/10/21/the-allen-high-rise-project-marks-construction-milestones/?type=article&utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=newsletter_article

 

 

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The Allen is the first mixed-use project in Houston that features both condominiums and a hotel since the Four Seasons hotel in Downtown Houston was completed in 1982. 

 

Doesn't The Post Oak have both or are they talking about inside the Loop?

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5 hours ago, thatguysly said:

The Allen is the first mixed-use project in Houston that features both condominiums and a hotel since the Four Seasons hotel in Downtown Houston was completed in 1982. 

 

Doesn't The Post Oak have both or are they talking about inside the Loop?

 

Pretty sure PO is hotel and office only.

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On 10/23/2020 at 8:56 AM, thatguysly said:

The Allen is the first mixed-use project in Houston that features both condominiums and a hotel since the Four Seasons hotel in Downtown Houston was completed in 1982. 

 

Doesn't The Post Oak have both or are they talking about inside the Loop?


In addition to being wrong about this being the first project to feature hotel and condos since the Four Seasons, they also misstate the history of the Four Seasons.  It did not have condos when it was built in 1982.  It was built with rental apartments.  They converted some of them to condos much later.  

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to The Allen: Allen Parkway/Gillette Mixed-Use 6-Acres

303df350e70f35a5448d4641a4cfd9c2-man-pho

^^^ @cityliving @Highrise Tower @hindesky simply outstanding illustrations gentlemen!  additionally, this newest form of high-end, ultra modern, sleek, and supremely sophisticated architecture of THE ALLEN... is something that we in the bayou city is just not accustomed to.   once fully completed, THE ALLEN is going to become a genuine SHOW STOPPER.  also, should they include the planned movie theater... WATCH OUT...

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