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The Allen: Allen Parkway/Gillette Mixed-Use 6 Acres

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This project has become very prominent, and the main tower hasn't even reached ground level! Whenever I'm on Memorial Drive headed to Buffalo Bayou Park, you can see 3-4 story building already going up very easily. It'll be a sight for sure once the main tower goes up, it will significantly alter the view looking towards downtown.

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36 minutes ago, CaptainJilliams said:

This project has become very prominent, and the main tower hasn't even reached ground level! Whenever I'm on Memorial Drive headed to Buffalo Bayou Park, you can see 3-4 story building already going up very easily. It'll be a sight for sure once the main tower goes up, it will significantly alter the view looking towards downtown.

🤔 Wonder how many high rises would be needed to connect the skyline from The Allen to Downtown? I'm betting about 8-10 more are needed (hell maybe 5 extra thicc ones). Now lets take this a little bit farther, how many are needed to connected Hanover square and Downtown completely? Now we're getting real L E N G T H. Excluding the current developments, maybe 25-30? 

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On 8/17/2020 at 9:21 PM, West Timer said:

27304647711_83ec92fdbe_b.jpg.603ebd6db2b6150b13b320f756bd82bd.jpg

 

This shot is actually at least a few years old as several towers are missing. 609 Main isn't up (or at least completed) yet. I'd love to see what this shot looks like in 20, 50 and 100 years from now.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, hindesky said:

They must have finished, the AT crane is gone but the construction video can't show it. Will check it out in the morning.

v2t4pQT.png

The AT Crane is gone, the assembly of the second crane is finished, the live cam isn't very clear, its blurry most of the time. The second crane isn't as tall as the first crane.

Edited by cityliving
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The two construction workers hanging off the rebar are probably only 18 feet off the ground, but it's enough to make my palms sweat as if they were 50 stories up!

 

I clearly am not suitable for that line of work!

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On 9/7/2020 at 6:21 AM, db650 said:

Any idea how sales are going for condo?

I don't know how many have been sold, but I can say that there's only 6 units left on HAR. Don't know if that means anything though, it might be a great or a bad sign but i'm leaning towards great.

 

Also all of those units besides 1 are in the 1 mil+ range, with the highest being 2.7 mil. 

Unit stated: https://www.har.com/homedetail/1711-allen-pkwy-3304-houston-tx-77019/15075870

Edited by TheSirDingle
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I'm sure this is going to have a best-in-class view of downtown, but man...nothing says "look at me in my ivory tower" than hanging out at your luxury pool while looking across the rooftops of a government-subsidized project...

Image 9-15-20 at 9.57 AM.png

Edited by mls1202
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That's better than pushing affordable housing out into the middle of nowhere though. I'd rather see affordable housing next door to luxury towers. Besides, there are plenty of market-rate two and three story townhouses in the immediate area as well. 

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That area is historically important. It shouldn't be moved or discounted because the ultra rich moved in. They can coexist. The City does need to go in a repair some the apartments but they do look much better than they did 10 years ago.

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40 minutes ago, Texasota said:

That's better than pushing affordable housing out into the middle of nowhere though. I'd rather see affordable housing next door to luxury towers. Besides, there are plenty of market-rate two and three story townhouses in the immediate area as well. 

I'm actually all in favor of mixed-income development, but I would prefer to see them more integrated.  The way these developments (i.e. ROD, The Allen, Regent Square, etc) are created, they exist as mini-cities unto themselves with boundaries that often ignore the neighborhood around them. There is nothing that ties The Allen into the apartments next door, not even an entrance on the east side (at least from what I can tell).

 

 

Image 9-15-20 at 11.10 AM.png

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I completely agree, but that's even more of a problem with Alley Parkway Village (the affordable housing). It's completely fenced with very few entrances. 

 

 

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6 hours ago, mls1202 said:

The way these developments (i.e. ROD, The Allen, Regent Square, etc) are created, they exist as mini-cities unto themselves with boundaries that often ignore the neighborhood around them.

 

Drive-to urbanism. The hope for urbanism in Houston is in downtown, midtown, maybe EaDo. Everything else is going to be a stretch.

 

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4 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Drive-to urbanism. The hope for urbanism in Houston is in downtown, midtown, maybe EaDo. Everything else is going to be a stretch.

 


montrose?

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I actually don't agree on Regent Square. Given its location, it will be pretty easily walkable and bikeable. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than most examples of "drive-to urbanism" simply by virtue of being next to an existing, relatively dense neighborhood. Its major streets are W Dallas and Dunlavy! 

 

Even the Allen isn't so bad- its biggest problem is that the surrounding developments aren't very porous, but its proximity to Buffalo Bayou Park, the (hopefully soon-to-be built) bike lanes on Dallas, high frequency bus line on Dallas, and Midtown and Montrose, it's really not that isolated. 

 

Edited by Texasota
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9 hours ago, clutchcity94 said:


montrose?

 

Possible but a stretch. Not a real street grid, most housing single-family. Montrose Boulevard still mostly lined with inactive properties. 

 

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15 minutes ago, Texasota said:

I actually don't agree on Regent Square. Given its location, it will be pretty easily walkable and bikeable. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than most examples of "drive-to urbanism" simply by virtue of being next to an existing, relatively dense neighborhood. Its major streets are W Dallas and Dunlavy! 

 

Even the Allen isn't so bad- its biggest problem is that the surrounding developments aren't very porous, but its proximity to Buffalo Bayou Park, the (hopefully soon-to-be built) bike lanes on Dallas, high frequency bus line on Dallas, and Midtown and Montrose, it's really not that isolated. 

 

 

These aren't bad developments. I think of urbanism as, you can perform your errands on foot and don't really need a car. That won't be possible from the Allen for a very long time, with the exception of walking to the park. Nor will hardly anyone else be walking to the Allen. Not that it's the Allen's fault, just the nature of the area. In downtown and midtown, such a lifestyle is foreseeable.

 

Edited by H-Town Man
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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Possible but a stretch. Not a real street grid, most housing single-family. Montrose Boulevard still mostly lined with inactive properties. 

 


That’s true. Why do you think so many of the properties on Montrose Blvd are inactive? I’ve noticed the same thing.

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Montrose is not a real street grid? What? I agree that Montrose BLVD needs a lot of help, but, as someone who has lived on both sides, I guarantee you can (and I have!) live easily without a car.

 

I also think you're just stating things as fact with pretty minimal evidence. You might be right that people living AT the Allen will usually drive everywhere, but, since it will also have retail, I do think people from surrounding neighborhoods will walk or bike there.

 

You're ignoring cycling access, which is a major factor for both Montrose and the Heights. 

 

I also don't agree that single family neighborhoods automatically = "not urban". Townhouse/rowhouse neighborhoods are the obvious example, but even traditional Montrose neighborhoods are more complicated than you imply. Montrose is full of duplexes, triplexes, small apartment buildings, garage apartments etc. When I lived on Kipling, it appeared from the street as a detached single family home on a large lot, but it was in fact a duplex with a garage apartment with three units.

 

It may not always look it, but Montrose is actually one of the neighborhoods I've lived in where having a car was least necessary. It's really only necessary for leaving the neighborhood, and even then, having a bike makes a lot of places easily accessible.  

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1 hour ago, Texasota said:

Montrose is not a real street grid? What? I agree that Montrose BLVD needs a lot of help, but, as someone who has lived on both sides, I guarantee you can (and I have!) live easily without a car.

 

I also think you're just stating things as fact with pretty minimal evidence. You might be right that people living AT the Allen will usually drive everywhere, but, since it will also have retail, I do think people from surrounding neighborhoods will walk or bike there.

 

You're ignoring cycling access, which is a major factor for both Montrose and the Heights. 

 

I also don't agree that single family neighborhoods automatically = "not urban". Townhouse/rowhouse neighborhoods are the obvious example, but even traditional Montrose neighborhoods are more complicated than you imply. Montrose is full of duplexes, triplexes, small apartment buildings, garage apartments etc. When I lived on Kipling, it appeared from the street as a detached single family home on a large lot, but it was in fact a duplex with a garage apartment with three units.

 

It may not always look it, but Montrose is actually one of the neighborhoods I've lived in where having a car was least necessary. It's really only necessary for leaving the neighborhood, and even then, having a bike makes a lot of places easily accessible.  

 

Calm down. Montrose is a great neighborhood, I just don't view it as urban. You're welcome to disagree. Maybe you're right. In fact, I'd be happy if you were right. I don't care that much.

 

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4 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Possible but a stretch. Not a real street grid, most housing single-family. Montrose Boulevard still mostly lined with inactive properties. 

 

 

as much a street grid as anywhere in this town, and more walk-able than most.

 

  

18 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Drive-to urbanism. The hope for urbanism in Houston is in downtown, midtown, maybe EaDo. Everything else is going to be a stretch.

 

 

add heights, the odd area between midtown and the museum district, rice village area as areas that can become this.

 

pretty much all of Houston that was built prior to the early/mid 60s is a full on street grid, and depending on how spicy developers get, they can very easily morph into urban areas. 

 

a lot of what is making midtown what it is is because of the light rail, it's not a stretch to assume that the other light rail corridors will be well along the similar path towards urban areas within 15 or so years, Harrisburg will probably lead this charge, as you mention, EaDo is already moving down that path.

Edited by samagon
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26 minutes ago, samagon said:

 

as much a street grid as anywhere in this town, and more walk-able than most.

 

  

 

add heights, the odd area between midtown and the museum district, rice village area as areas that can become this.

 

pretty much all of Houston that was built prior to the early/mid 60s is a full on street grid, and depending on how spicy developers get, they can very easily morph into urban areas. 

 

a lot of what is making midtown what it is is because of the light rail, it's not a stretch to assume that the other light rail corridors will be well along the similar path towards urban areas within 15 or so years, Harrisburg will probably lead this charge, as you mention, EaDo is already moving down that path.


what’s the odd area between midtown and the museum district? I’m trying to picture it.

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3 minutes ago, clutchcity94 said:


what’s the odd area between midtown and the museum district? I’m trying to picture it.

the area just south of 59. honestly, it may be considered as the museum district, but I don't really think of anything north of Southmore as being museum district.

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4 minutes ago, samagon said:

the area just south of 59. honestly, it may be considered as the museum district, but I don't really think of anything north of Southmore as being museum district.

Museum Park 

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