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Oh my, do I remember going to the downtown Foley's.

My mom wasn't bad about having a lead foot (she never had one traffic ticket, ever), but one of the things she (and others in her car) always enjoyed was the down/exit ramp in Foleys parking garage !

She discovered that if you found just the right position with your steering wheel (she had a '63 Olds 98)....you could just fly down the floors' ramps without once moving the steering wheel !....well,...providing there was no one ahead of you or no one getting on the ramp ahead of you.

Seemed terribly exhilerating for someone in grade school having your mom point that out and then going around and around to the bottom floor.

Awesome.

I remember a few times after I got my driver's license, discovering it for myself.

I also remember eating at The Terrace restaurant.

There was one dish that was baked, and had a French name I can't remember.

But the dish seemed to have a mild white cheese sauce browned on top with layers of chicken breast and tomato slices inside. I ordered that more than anything else.

Nine floors.....it was a massive store.

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While it is all the rage to blame "Houston" for tearing everything down, I must come to "Houston's" defense by pointing out that Macy's is a corporation with headquarters in Cincinnati and New York.

I miss Foley's I miss Foley's, too. It was the last of the hometown department stores. When you think about how involved they all used to be in civic support, etc. Foley's, Sakowitz, Joske's, Craig'

I found this while trying to find the logo with the asterisk: http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2006/10/page/10/

Oh my, do I remember going to the downtown Foley's.

My mom wasn't bad about having a lead foot (she never had one traffic ticket, ever), but one of the things she (and others in her car) always enjoyed was the down/exit ramp in Foleys parking garage !

She discovered that if you found just the right position with your steering wheel (she had a '63 Olds 98)....you could just fly down the floors' ramps without once moving the steering wheel !....well,...providing there was no one ahead of you or no one getting on the ramp ahead of you.

Seemed terribly exhilerating for someone in grade school having your mom point that out and then going around and around to the bottom floor.

Awesome.

I remember a few times after I got my driver's license, discovering it for myself.

I also remember eating at The Terrace restaurant.

There was one dish that was baked, and had a French name I can't remember.

But the dish seemed to have a mild white cheese sauce browned on top with layers of chicken breast and tomato slices inside. I ordered that more than anything else.

Nine floors.....it was a massive store.

Welcome gargoyle_dreams, nice to hear a new story...I don't think I ever went into the downtown Foley's. I love the old dept. stores. I need to go walk around in it, see if there are any traces of the old ornamentation.

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Oh my, do I remember going to the downtown Foley's.

My mom wasn't bad about having a lead foot (she never had one traffic ticket, ever), but one of the things she (and others in her car) always enjoyed was the down/exit ramp in Foleys parking garage !

She discovered that if you found just the right position with your steering wheel (she had a '63 Olds 98)....you could just fly down the floors' ramps without once moving the steering wheel !....well,...providing there was no one ahead of you or no one getting on the ramp ahead of you.

Seemed terribly exhilerating for someone in grade school having your mom point that out and then going around and around to the bottom floor.

Awesome.

I remember a few times after I got my driver's license, discovering it for myself.

I also remember eating at The Terrace restaurant.

There was one dish that was baked, and had a French name I can't remember.

But the dish seemed to have a mild white cheese sauce browned on top with layers of chicken breast and tomato slices inside. I ordered that more than anything else.

Nine floors.....it was a massive store.

It was a great store...you could spend a day there.

PS - the main restaurant was called the Azalea Terrace. There was also a "Men only" grill.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thank You....it was Azalea Terrace.....The Terrace kept sounding like something was missing...I just couldn't remember it.

Foley's had the BEST cheese soup anywhere. I wish I could get that recipe. The Foley's Lunch Express was great across the street in the 1st floor of the parking garage. The Men's Grill was on 2 in the Men's suit department. Azalea Terrace was on 5. Do you remember the bakery on 1? The branch stores' restaurant was called The Greenhouse. It was a great store. 12 floors. As it grew the sales floor shrank to 5 floors to accomodate the offices. Prior to being sold off to May, Foley's had the fur salon, personal shoppers, carpets, decortator studio, photo studio, beauty salons, watch and jewelry repair, estate jewelry, travel department, books, toys, candy, lamps, cooking demonstrations, the Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade, Foley's Academy (a school in the Basement of the Downtown Store for troubled kids), major appliances, televisions, stereos, men's big and tall, fur storage, downtown Christmas windows, floral department and a host of other departments and services. Of course, now it has been eaten by Macy's like ever other regional department store and taken further downmarket. I hated to see them weld off the art deco Foley's letters. It just shows the disregard Macy's has for the history and traditions of the old stores.

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Foley's had the BEST cheese soup anywhere. I wish I could get that recipe. The Foley's Lunch Express was great across the street in the 1st floor of the parking garage. The Men's Grill was on 2 in the Men's suit department. Azalea Terrace was on 5. Do you remember the bakery on 1? The branch stores' restaurant was called The Greenhouse. It was a great store. 12 floors. As it grew the sales floor shrank to 5 floors to accomodate the offices. Prior to being sold off to May, Foley's had the fur salon, personal shoppers, carpets, decortator studio, photo studio, beauty salons, watch and jewelry repair, estate jewelry, travel department, books, toys, candy, lamps, cooking demonstrations, the Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade, Foley's Academy (a school in the Basement of the Downtown Store for troubled kids), major appliances, televisions, stereos, men's big and tall, fur storage, downtown Christmas windows, floral department and a host of other departments and services. Of course, now it has been eaten by Macy's like ever other regional department store and taken further downmarket. I hated to see them weld off the art deco Foley's letters. It just shows the disregard Macy's has for the history and traditions of the old stores.

By the way, take a look at this awesome pic from flikr of the Greenspoint store when it opened:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14743243@N02/1520339100/

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Foley's had the BEST cheese soup anywhere. I wish I could get that recipe. The Foley's Lunch Express was great across the street in the 1st floor of the parking garage. The Men's Grill was on 2 in the Men's suit department. Azalea Terrace was on 5. Do you remember the bakery on 1? The branch stores' restaurant was called The Greenhouse. It was a great store. 12 floors. As it grew the sales floor shrank to 5 floors to accomodate the offices. Prior to being sold off to May, Foley's had the fur salon, personal shoppers, carpets, decortator studio, photo studio, beauty salons, watch and jewelry repair, estate jewelry, travel department, books, toys, candy, lamps, cooking demonstrations, the Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade, Foley's Academy (a school in the Basement of the Downtown Store for troubled kids), major appliances, televisions, stereos, men's big and tall, fur storage, downtown Christmas windows, floral department and a host of other departments and services. Of course, now it has been eaten by Macy's like ever other regional department store and taken further downmarket. I hated to see them weld off the art deco Foley's letters. It just shows the disregard Macy's has for the history and traditions of the old stores.

Are you sure about that 12 floors? I thought there were only 9 or 10 floors in the building.

Edited by Houston19514
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Foley's had the BEST cheese soup anywhere. I wish I could get that recipe. The Foley's Lunch Express was great across the street in the 1st floor of the parking garage. The Men's Grill was on 2 in the Men's suit department. Azalea Terrace was on 5. Do you remember the bakery on 1? The branch stores' restaurant was called The Greenhouse. It was a great store. 12 floors. As it grew the sales floor shrank to 5 floors to accomodate the offices. Prior to being sold off to May, Foley's had the fur salon, personal shoppers, carpets, decortator studio, photo studio, beauty salons, watch and jewelry repair, estate jewelry, travel department, books, toys, candy, lamps, cooking demonstrations, the Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade, Foley's Academy (a school in the Basement of the Downtown Store for troubled kids), major appliances, televisions, stereos, men's big and tall, fur storage, downtown Christmas windows, floral department and a host of other departments and services. Of course, now it has been eaten by Macy's like ever other regional department store and taken further downmarket. I hated to see them weld off the art deco Foley's letters. It just shows the disregard Macy's has for the history and traditions of the old stores.

Wonder what happened to those art deco Foley's letters. Are they just sitting in a warehouse somewhere, gathering dust? Hope they didn't get thrown out or melted down. So much is disregarded & discarded in this city.

Edited by NenaE
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Are you sure about that 12 floors? I thought there were only 9 or 10 floors in the building.

Yep. It was originally built with 9 floors but they added 3 more. You can see the difference in the color of the limestone if you look closely at photos. The store was built in 1947 and I believe it was added onto about 10 years later.

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Wonder what happened to those art deco Foley's letters. Are they just sitting in a warehouse somewhere, gathering dust? Hope they didn't get thrown out or melted down. So much is disregarded & discarded in this city.

I agree. It is a shame that so much has been torn down and thrown away. Look at all the movie palaces Houston once had - among them the beautiful Majestic, Loews State and Metropolitan. I was delighted (and surprised) that they did not tear down The Rice Hotel.

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While it is all the rage to blame "Houston" for tearing everything down, I must come to "Houston's" defense by pointing out that Macy's is a corporation with headquarters in Cincinnati and New York. "Houston" did not cut and discard the Foley's letters. Macy's did. And, yes, much has been diregarded and discarded in Cincy and New York...including our old Foley's letters.

Remember, Houston based Foley's kept the letters. New York/Cincy based Macy's got rid of them.

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Wonder what happened to those art deco Foley's letters. Are they just sitting in a warehouse somewhere, gathering dust?
i doubt we're that lucky. i could spell my name with em. just have to remove the bird excrement.
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Yep. It was originally built with 9 floors but they added 3 more. You can see the difference in the color of the limestone if you look closely at photos. The store was built in 1947 and I believe it was added onto about 10 years later.

I'm pretty sure it was originally built with 6 floors with 3 more added later.

Edited by Houston19514
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While it is all the rage to blame "Houston" for tearing everything down, I must come to "Houston's" defense by pointing out that Macy's is a corporation with headquarters in Cincinnati and New York. "Houston" did not cut and discard the Foley's letters. Macy's did. And, yes, much has been diregarded and discarded in Cincy and New York...including our old Foley's letters.

Remember, Houston based Foley's kept the letters. New York/Cincy based Macy's got rid of them.

Very good point!

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While it is all the rage to blame "Houston" for tearing everything down, I must come to "Houston's" defense by pointing out that Macy's is a corporation with headquarters in Cincinnati and New York. "Houston" did not cut and discard the Foley's letters. Macy's did. And, yes, much has been diregarded and discarded in Cincy and New York...including our old Foley's letters.

Remember, Houston based Foley's kept the letters. New York/Cincy based Macy's got rid of them.

I'm one of the oldtimers who remembers when Foley's was Houston's Department Store--before any suburban branches. (Sakowitz was Houston's Expensive Store; Neiman's was even more expensive & out of Dallas.) Occasionally Mom would spring for the Azalea Terrace; I thought the little tea sandwiches were really high class. But we usually ate at the lunch counters on the first floor, where sunglasses are now sold. I remember a "new" lunch counter that opened in the Basement; now, I realize it was formerly for "colored people." (Foley's management played a part in desegregating Houston; The Strange Demise of Jim Crow shows up on Channel 8 occasionally.) And I missed the window of opportunity after The Men's Grill was opened to all & before it closed.

So I could join in the chorus yearning for The Old Foley's. Back when all the windows were devoted to amazing Christmas displays. When all the floors were open to shoppers. When you'd drop by to get the latest books & records

But at least the current owners have kept the place open! Sakowitz is a parking garage; Ed Wulfe's signs are gone, so I guess nobody has any plans. And Neiman's is a frakking CVS. Many of the old Foley's fixtures are still there & I get the impression some of the old areas were just walled in with sheetrock, rather than being destroyed.

Friday, on my way to the light rail stop, I noticed there was a sale at Macy's. So I dropped in for a bit of light shopping & didn't even mind waiting in line. Because there were actually people around, buying stuff.

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I agree. It is a shame that so much has been torn down and thrown away. Look at all the movie palaces Houston once had - among them the beautiful Majestic, Loews State and Metropolitan. I was delighted (and surprised) that they did not tear down The Rice Hotel.

My mother was telling me yesterday that she wished she could have shared the "beautiful" Majestic Theater with me.

True (above post), at least the Foleys (Macy's) is still standing, as a department store we can shop in, and admire.

Edited by NenaE
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My mother was telling me yesterday that she wished she could have shared the "beautiful" Majestic Theater with me.

True (above post), at least the Foleys (Macy's) is still standing, as a department store we can shop in, and admire.

The Majestic, Loew's & The Metropolitan were all wonderful, although they were rare treats. Downtown was a significant trip & the family budget ran more to drive-ins.

Why weren't we out there protesting when they were demolished? Protecting our city's past just hadn't become an issue back then. Suddenly, we realized they were gone. And the site of Loew's & The Metropolitan on Main Street remained a vacant lot for many years.

So Foley's is now Macy's & not as fine as it once was. But it's not a vacant lot. Or a parking garage. Or a CVS....

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  • 4 weeks later...

I remember my mom having a card with the old-fashioned lower case logo with the asterisk for what seemed like an eternity..

Here are a couple logos:

foleys_002.jpg

foleys_001.jpg

Does anyone remember the old commercials: "Foley's is magical, unpredictable, sensational...you know you want Foley's!" from the 1970s. Or from 1984 - "At the heart of Texas... Foley's!" (this came out after RH Macy entered the Houston market to stress Foley's hometown roots). From 1987 prior to the Sanger-Harris merger (and used some time afterwards) "Foley's...of course!" Anyone have any of the old commercials on video to share?

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My mother was telling me yesterday that she wished she could have shared the "beautiful" Majestic Theater with me.

True (above post), at least the Foleys (Macy's) is still standing, as a department store we can shop in, and admire.

My parents told me they took me and my brother and sister to the Majestic to see "The Birds" and "Planet of the Apes". Of course, that was in the late 60's/early 70's and we were too small to remember it. I have seen photos and my mom described it in detail. It, as well as the Metropolitan and Loews State, truly was an architectural gem.

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Why does it have two logos...so close to each other, and at an odd angle to one another?

I miss Foley's :(

I miss Foley's, too. It was the last of the hometown department stores. When you think about how involved they all used to be in civic support, etc. Foley's, Sakowitz, Joske's, Craig's, Walter Pye's, Isabell Gerhart, the true Beall's and Palais Royal - when they were separate entities and unique. Remember the Foley's Thanksgiving Day Parade? the Foley's Academy in the basement downtown for kids struggling in school?

Each region used to have their own stores, history and traditions. Look at Marshall Fields and what they meant to Chicago. Burdine's to Florida, Rich's to Atlanta, Bullock's, I Magnin and The Broadway to southern California.

It is a real shame. Southern California, for instance, used to have May Co., The Broadway, Macy's (the original RH Macy Co. - not the Kmart of today), I Magnin, Emporium, Capwell's, Bullock's, Bullock's Wilshire, Robinson's, Gottschalks and Harris'. Now all they have is ONE - Macy's. Talk about no competition. Where are all the bleeding hearts and their talk of anti trust problems? Virtually every market across the country is in the same position. It all started with the greed on Wall Street allowing Campeau ( a real estate tycoon from Canada) to purchase Allied Stores and then Federated Dept Stores -- all with junk bonds, none of his money --- which eventually caused the bankruptcy and consolidation of centuries old icons. Read "Going For Broke" and "The Rain on Macy's Parade". Both very good books on this debacle.

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My parents told me they took me and my brother and sister to the Majestic to see "The Birds" and "Planet of the Apes". Of course, that was in the late 60's/early 70's and we were too small to remember it. I have seen photos and my mom described it in detail. It, as well as the Metropolitan and Loews State, truly was an architectural gem.

Know I'm veering off here, but have to say, while watching Phantom of the Opera last night in the new Performing Arts place, with the elaborate old opera sets, I kept wondering what the old Houston theaters must have been like. Was wishing I could have stood in them, at least once.

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Know I'm veering off here, but have to say, while watching Phantom of the Opera last night in the new Performing Arts place, with the elaborate old opera sets, I kept wondering what the old Houston theaters must have been like. Was wishing I could have stood in them, at least once.

They were indeed great...my wife and I went to the "big 3" many times in the 60's.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Having a been a little late to the mall scene, my favorite defunct store is Foley's, having being absorbed to Macy's. I always thought it was cool, it had a neat exterior (my local store was Post Oak Mall) AND it was the only place for miles around to have ESCALATORS!!

But even in the mid-to-late 1990s, Foley's, from what I remember when my mother dragged me there, had little more than clothing and housewares. But I've heard and learned so much more. I've now learned to identify old Foley's...the 1960s ones (Northwest Mall and Almeda), the 1970s one (Greenspoint, San Jacinto, West Oaks), the 1980s (Post Oak and Padre Staples Mall), and the Sanger Harris ones in Dallas (Six Flags Mall, Valley View, and North Hills, now all closed).

For example, the Greenspoint Foley's once had Nintendo games, a cool kid's department set up like a Star Wars spaceship, and even a restaurant. I've heard wonderful things about Foley's on the HAIF, and have had to defend Foley's on other occasions. Check this out (from a comment on Labelscar)

Of course, that is forgivable, since this fellow clearly stated he lived in Milwaukee, but then a comment posted six hours later...

I tried to defend Foley's, but I had never shopped at Foley's (I love malls but despise shopping) nor experienced the "glory days". Anyways, I always liked it, I liked seeing the HQ building on 610 when my family went down to Houston, but on September 9, 2006, Foley's perished forever in favor of the it-what-must-not-be-named retailer from Manhattan.

So, you having better memories of Foley's than I do, let's hear it. What departments did they have, for starters? And don't forget to share fond stories.

Yes, it was a shame to see Foley's, Joske's & Sakowitz leave us. But the business community called it "progress."

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I've now learned to identify old Foley's...the 1960s ones (Northwest Mall and Almeda), the 1970s one (Greenspoint, San Jacinto, West Oaks), the 1980s (Post Oak and Padre Staples Mall), and the Sanger Harris ones in Dallas (Six Flags Mall, Valley View, and North Hills, now all closed).

The West Oaks store actually opened around 1981 (when Hwy 6 @ FM 1093 was the middle of nowhere), with the mall following a couple of years later.

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<br />Yes, it was a shame to see Foley's, Joske's & Sakowitz leave us.  But the business community called it "progress."<br />
<br /><br /><br />

To the post requesting the departments Foley's had:

* Personal Shopper

* Travel department

* Watch and Jewelry Repair

* Restaurants (branch stores had "The Greenhouse" while downtown had the Azalea Terrace, Men's Grill (later the Grill), Juniors Snack Bar, Lunch Express and the Bakery.

* Big and Tall

* Fur Salon

* Fur storage and cleaning

* Beauty Salon

* Photo Studio

* Toys

* Books

* Candy (not just Godiva but fresh candy from the downtown store to the branches)

* Stationery (with designer pens and other very nice office accessories)

* Lamps

* Carpet and Flooring

* Stereos

* Major Appliances

* Televisions

* Records and Tapes

* In-store Pharmacy and drug department

* Lawn and Garden

* Game Shop (with Nintendo, Atari and others)

* In-Store Decorator

* Fine China, Silver and Crystal (not the bland stuff Macy's carries)

* Children's shoes

* Main Floor and Salon Shoes

* The Lion's Head (Men's Cologne Bar located in the Men's department

* Furniture

* In-Store cooking demonstrations by local celebrities and restaurants (like Mama Ninfa Laurenzo from Ninfa's)

* The Foley's Academy (at the Downtown store) for kids struggling in school

* The Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade and Christmas lights at the downtown store

The departments listed were at all branch stores unless indicated at the downtown store only.

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<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />To the post requesting the departments Foley's had: <br /><br />* Personal Shopper<br />* Travel department<br />* Watch and Jewelry Repair<br />* Restaurants (branch stores had "The Greenhouse" while downtown had the Azalea Terrace,  Men's Grill (later the Grill), Juniors Snack Bar, Lunch Express and the Bakery. <br />* Big and Tall <br />* Fur Salon<br />* Fur storage and cleaning <br />* Beauty Salon<br />* Photo Studio <br />* Toys<br />* Books<br />* Candy (not just Godiva but fresh candy from the downtown store to the branches)<br />* Stationery (with designer pens and other very nice office accessories)<br />* Lamps<br />* Carpet and Flooring<br />* Stereos <br />* Major Appliances<br />* Televisions<br />* Records and Tapes <br />* In-store Pharmacy and drug department<br />* Lawn and Garden<br />* Game Shop (with Nintendo, Atari and others)<br />* In-Store Decorator<br />* Fine China, Silver and Crystal (not the bland stuff Macy's carries)<br />* Children's shoes <br />* Main Floor and Salon Shoes <br />* The Lion's Head (Men's Cologne Bar located in the Men's department <br />* Furniture<br />* In-Store cooking demonstrations by local celebrities and restaurants (like Mama Ninfa Laurenzo from Ninfa's) <br />* The Foley's Academy (at the Downtown store) for kids struggling in school<br />* The Foley's Thanksgiving Day parade and Christmas lights at the downtown store<br /> <br />The departments listed were at all branch stores unless indicated at the downtown store only.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Also, each store had a "Cash Office" for cashing checks (as long as you had a Foley's account) and selling tickets for the Nutcracker and other special events.

Downtown had the Bargain Basement with the branch stores having the "Budget Store" that was typically on the 2nd floor. It offered more value oriented merchandise.

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<br /><br /><br />

Also, each store had a "Cash Office" for cashing checks (as long as you had a Foley's account) and selling tickets for the Nutcracker and other special events.

Downtown had the Bargain Basement with the branch stores having the "Budget Store" that was typically on the 2nd floor. It offered more value oriented merchandise.

For those that are interested, I have a Foley's Yahoo group. Called (what else?) Foley's of course. I have links to old TV commercials, photos, etc not only of Foley's but of other regional stores that have disappeared.

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My mom and I always had lunch at the Azalea Terrace when shopping at Foley's. When I was real small (in the 50's) I would always order the "Little Bo Peep" special which was vegetable soup and four points of a ham sandwich which had the crust cut off....there was also animal crackers at the end.

Christmas time was the best and I always saw Santa at the downtown Foley's since that is where the "real" Santa was according to my mom. I could spend hours in the toy store looking for the latest American Flyer trains.

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<br /><br /><br />

Also, each store had a "Cash Office" for cashing checks (as long as you had a Foley's account) and selling tickets for the Nutcracker and other special events.

Downtown had the Bargain Basement with the branch stores having the "Budget Store" that was typically on the 2nd floor. It offered more value oriented merchandise.

The Northwest Mall location had a Budget Store that ended up closed sometime in the late 80's. Every once in a while after that section of the store was closed off by drywall, they'd remove the temporary wall and use that section for big sales and such. Talk about a blast from the past, when it was opened back up for those short periods of time. The rest of the Foley's upstairs had been facelifted in the early 90's. This part of the upstairs was still from the 70's, complete with loud colored stripes adorning all the walls. What a contrast.

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The Northwest Mall location had a Budget Store that ended up closed sometime in the late 80's. Every once in a while after that section of the store was closed off by drywall, they'd remove the temporary wall and use that section for big sales and such. Talk about a blast from the past, when it was opened back up for those short periods of time. The rest of the Foley's upstairs had been facelifted in the early 90's. This part of the upstairs was still from the 70's, complete with loud colored stripes adorning all the walls. What a contrast.

I wonder what the upstairs looks like now. It was likely the most damaged during Ike.

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Ahh, the memories! Yes, Foley's downtown was a class act in it's day! It was a bus ride into downtown Houston to shop at Foley's for us as kids. I worked at the Pharmacy on the 1st floor when I was 19 in 1982. Talk about eating places, there was so many at Foley's downtown. The Terrace on 5, The Brown Bag on the 1st floor next to the Travis Street exit, The Cafeteria in the basement, The Grill on 2, the hot dog stand in the basement tunnel leading to the parking garage, The Deli on the ground floor of the Parking Garage, The Bakery right next to The Brown Bag.

Major appliances on, I believe 7, books on 8, Beauty Salon on 6, Tickmaster on 9, Records & tapes on 9. The Town Hall on 9 where they had the awesome Santa (complete with fake snow) every holiday season, toys on 4, etc, etc.

I moved to NY in 1985 and at that time the dowtown store was still a class act. I moved back to Houston in 1999 and just had to head for downtown Foley's to be nostaglic. Imagine my shock and horror at what I saw! Shopping floors ended on the 5th floor, salesman now wearing tacky blue aprons? WTF? (salesmen used to wear a suit and tie) At first I thought it was part of the decaying Main Street at that time but later realized it was also due to the fact that it was no longer a Federated Store and was now a member of the May Department Stores.

Someone asked what the Macy's on Main Street is like today? I can answer that in one word - DEPRESSING!

Oh and the building is not 12 stories, it is 10. Built in 1947 with 6 floors (I'm almost sure retail ended on 5), about 10 years later 4 more storeis were added with retail ending on 9)

Yes, I too, miss Foley's!

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  • 7 months later...

(If I missed an earlier post, please forgive me.)

Isn't Foley's notable because the highly regarded industrial designer, Raymond Lowey, contributed to its interior design?

Fans of Coca-Cola bottles, Studebakers and Air Force One may recognize the name.

(An aside: no, The Niche, I'm not going to serve as your unpaid research assistant on this one.)

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  • 1 month later...

How many logos did Foley's have over the years? There's the red FOLEY'S (??-60s), foley*s (through the late 60s-early 80s?), FOLEY'S (with part of the E missing, early 1980s-early 1990s), FOLEY'S (sort of like 1980s one, early 1990s-2006)...am I missing anything?

Also, when did the branch restaurants close?

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How many logos did Foley's have over the years? There's the red FOLEY'S (??-60s), foley*s (through the late 60s-early 80s?), FOLEY'S (with part of the E missing, early 1980s-early 1990s), FOLEY'S (sort of like 1980s one, early 1990s-2006)...am I missing anything?

Also, when did the branch restaurants close?

Foley's had several logos in their history. In the 1940s it was a all caps logo with rust being the new company color scheme. Their slogan at the opening of the new Foley's in 1947 was "Building a bigger Texas, building a bigger Houston, building a bigger Foley's". Once the store opened, the slogan went "Tops in Texas.. Foley's"

Later in the 1940's they had the Foley's..of course slogan.

In the early 1960's the lower case Foley's logo was designed and implemented after the opening of the new Sharpstown branch store. It had an azalea type of logo utilized for the apostrophe. The new logo was turqoise and was reflected on the chargecards, bags, boxes, etc. Later in the early 1970s the azalea apostrophe was dropped for an asterisk. The colors were changed to burnt orange and olive green. Some had the misconception that they changed to the asterisk logo because with the opening of each new branch store, a new "leaf" was added. However, that was not the case. In the late 1970's the avant garde foley's logo was created. It was all lower case letters but still had the asterisk (this time at the bottom,between the y and s). Bags and boxes were in a yellow with navy typeface. Then, in approximately 1981, the logo was changed again to incorporate a star in the asterisk logo. The store colors became rust as they were in the 1940s. Bags, gift boxes, fleet delivery trucks and even the backdrops of store counters (fine jewelry, for example, where jewelry would be displayed) reflected this. The slogan in the 1970s was "Foley's is magical, unpredictable, sensational, you know you want Foley's"

In 1984, the RH Macy company (the original, upscale Macy's, not the Kmart we have now) entered the Houston marketplace. Foley's and Joske's were historically the main competitors at area malls. Sometimes, (as was the case with Northline, Northwest, Almeda, The Galleria, Sharpstown, for instance) where there was a Foley's, there was not a Joske's. Foley's and Joske's would also compete with Sakowitz and Frost Brothers with some of their designer departments and fur salons. However, Macy's was new to the area and Foley's was preparing for the competition. They drew up a new slogan and logo to fight back, stressing their hometown roots. It was "At the heart of Texas...Foley's!" The new store colors became grey and white with a peach heart that was placed in the E. The asterisk/star was dropped altogether. Letters were all upper case and the E had no vertical line. Ads were on the airwaves and newspapers. I recall one ad that showed two yuppies running for a plane with luggage in hand. Behind them in black and white was a stage coach. "Texans have always knowns how to catch the next stage.. with luggage from Foley's". Macy's had their slogan "We're Macy's and we're a part of your life!". The Foley's Deerbrook was designed to go head to toe with the first Macy's at the same mall.

In 1986 Foley's introduced their "Foley's...of course!" campaign. It was a highly successful run that went on for many years. Many do not know they had the "of course" campaign many years prior in the 1930s or 1940s.

The next change came in 1987. Federated, which had owned Foley's since the 1940s, announced that Foley's would merge with her sister store, Sanger-Harris, in Dallas. Headquarters would remain in Houston and Sanger-Harris would be rebranded as Foley's. Foley's continued their "of course" campaign but added, at the bottom of the logo on bags "now including Sanger-Harris".

The merger was barely complete when corporate raider Campeau took over Allied Department Stores and dismantled, shut down and sold off many chains across the nation. Jordan Marsh and Joske's were 2 of the twenty some odd divisions that were affected. Dillard's purchased Joske's and promptly rebranded. Campeau, still not satisfied, raided Federated and took them over with junk bonds, as he had Allied. Foley's and Filene's (Boston) were promptly sold off to May Company. The Foley's we always knew would never be the same. Many departments were liquidated immediately. Those included the Fur Salons, jewelry and watch repair, junior accessories, Big and Tall, personal shopper, photo studio, beauty salons, sporting goods, books, toys, candy, carpets and floor coverings, pharmacy, records and tapes, major appliances and televisions. Federated had already shut down the Budget Store in 1985 in an attempt to move more upscale. The restaurants continued for a time. One by one, however, they started shuttering the branch store restaurants. This occured in the early 1990s. Downtown also lost The Grill (Men's Grill prior to the women's movement) on the 2nd floor, The Terrace on the 5th floor, Lunch Express across the street in the parking garage as well as the much frequented bakery.

May changed the typeface of the Foley's logo to reflect the same font as the other divisions. It was an upper case F with other letters lower case.

The Federated/Allied merger went bankrupt causing the consolidation and demise of hundreds of chains of department stores nationwide that had been the heritage of so many cities. The Federated that emerged from bankruptcy was not the old Federated. RH Macy had also gone bankrupt with the name being purchased by the new Federated. Federated bought May Company in 2006 and rebranded all May divisions to Macy's as they had with all the prior Federated chains, with the exception of Bloomingdale's.

Some may remember the sales that were specific to Foley's -- their anniversary sale in September, the "Remnant Days" sale (end of season clearances) and their annual White Sale.

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Foley's had several logos in their history. In the 1940s it was a all caps logo with rust being the new company color scheme. Their slogan at the opening of the new Foley's in 1947 was "Building a bigger Texas, building a bigger Houston, building a bigger Foley's". Once the store opened, the slogan went "Tops in Texas.. Foley's"

Later in the 1940's they had the Foley's..of course slogan.

In the early 1960's the lower case Foley's logo was designed and implemented after the opening of the new Sharpstown branch store. It had an azalea type of logo utilized for the apostrophe. The new logo was turqoise and was reflected on the chargecards, bags, boxes, etc. Later in the early 1970s the azalea apostrophe was dropped for an asterisk. The colors were changed to burnt orange and olive green. Some had the misconception that they changed to the asterisk logo because with the opening of each new branch store, a new "leaf" was added. However, that was not the case. In the late 1970's the avant garde foley's logo was created. It was all lower case letters but still had the asterisk (this time at the bottom,between the y and s). Bags and boxes were in a yellow with navy typeface. Then, in approximately 1981, the logo was changed again to incorporate a star in the asterisk logo. The store colors became rust as they were in the 1940s. Bags, gift boxes, fleet delivery trucks and even the backdrops of store counters (fine jewelry, for example, where jewelry would be displayed) reflected this. The slogan in the 1970s was "Foley's is magical, unpredictable, sensational, you know you want Foley's"

In 1984, the RH Macy company (the original, upscale Macy's, not the Kmart we have now) entered the Houston marketplace. Foley's and Joske's were historically the main competitors at area malls. Sometimes, (as was the case with Northline, Northwest, Almeda, The Galleria, Sharpstown, for instance) where there was a Foley's, there was not a Joske's. Foley's and Joske's would also compete with Sakowitz and Frost Brothers with some of their designer departments and fur salons. However, Macy's was new to the area and Foley's was preparing for the competition. They drew up a new slogan and logo to fight back, stressing their hometown roots. It was "At the heart of Texas...Foley's!" The new store colors became grey and white with a peach heart that was placed in the E. The asterisk/star was dropped altogether. Letters were all upper case and the E had no vertical line. Ads were on the airwaves and newspapers. I recall one ad that showed two yuppies running for a plane with luggage in hand. Behind them in black and white was a stage coach. "Texans have always knowns how to catch the next stage.. with luggage from Foley's". Macy's had their slogan "We're Macy's and we're a part of your life!". The Foley's Deerbrook was designed to go head to toe with the first Macy's at the same mall.

In 1986 Foley's introduced their "Foley's...of course!" campaign. It was a highly successful run that went on for many years. Many do not know they had the "of course" campaign many years prior in the 1930s or 1940s.

The next change came in 1987. Federated, which had owned Foley's since the 1940s, announced that Foley's would merge with her sister store, Sanger-Harris, in Dallas. Headquarters would remain in Houston and Sanger-Harris would be rebranded as Foley's. Foley's continued their "of course" campaign but added, at the bottom of the logo on bags "now including Sanger-Harris".

The merger was barely complete when corporate raider Campeau took over Allied Department Stores and dismantled, shut down and sold off many chains across the nation. Jordan Marsh and Joske's were 2 of the twenty some odd divisions that were affected. Dillard's purchased Joske's and promptly rebranded. Campeau, still not satisfied, raided Federated and took them over with junk bonds, as he had Allied. Foley's and Filene's (Boston) were promptly sold off to May Company. The Foley's we always knew would never be the same. Many departments were liquidated immediately. Those included the Fur Salons, jewelry and watch repair, junior accessories, Big and Tall, personal shopper, photo studio, beauty salons, sporting goods, books, toys, candy, carpets and floor coverings, pharmacy, records and tapes, major appliances and televisions. Federated had already shut down the Budget Store in 1985 in an attempt to move more upscale. The restaurants continued for a time. One by one, however, they started shuttering the branch store restaurants. This occured in the early 1990s. Downtown also lost The Grill (Men's Grill prior to the women's movement) on the 2nd floor, The Terrace on the 5th floor, Lunch Express across the street in the parking garage as well as the much frequented bakery.

May changed the typeface of the Foley's logo to reflect the same font as the other divisions. It was an upper case F with other letters lower case.

The Federated/Allied merger went bankrupt causing the consolidation and demise of hundreds of chains of department stores nationwide that had been the heritage of so many cities. The Federated that emerged from bankruptcy was not the old Federated. RH Macy had also gone bankrupt with the name being purchased by the new Federated. Federated bought May Company in 2006 and rebranded all May divisions to Macy's as they had with all the prior Federated chains, with the exception of Bloomingdale's.

Some may remember the sales that were specific to Foley's -- their anniversary sale in September, the "Remnant Days" sale (end of season clearances) and their annual White Sale.

For nostalgia sake, here are some commercials for Foley's and Joske's:

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7zlsr_foley-s-department-store_lifestyle

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x4ajek_joske-s-department-store

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Foley's had several logos in their history. In the 1940s it was a all caps logo with rust being the new company color scheme. Their slogan at the opening of the new Foley's in 1947 was "Building a bigger Texas, building a bigger Houston, building a bigger Foley's". Once the store opened, the slogan went "Tops in Texas.. Foley's"

Later in the 1940's they had the Foley's..of course slogan.

In the early 1960's the lower case Foley's logo was designed and implemented after the opening of the new Sharpstown branch store. It had an azalea type of logo utilized for the apostrophe. The new logo was turqoise and was reflected on the chargecards, bags, boxes, etc. Later in the early 1970s the azalea apostrophe was dropped for an asterisk. The colors were changed to burnt orange and olive green. Some had the misconception that they changed to the asterisk logo because with the opening of each new branch store, a new "leaf" was added. However, that was not the case. In the late 1970's the avant garde foley's logo was created. It was all lower case letters but still had the asterisk (this time at the bottom,between the y and s). Bags and boxes were in a yellow with navy typeface. Then, in approximately 1981, the logo was changed again to incorporate a star in the asterisk logo. The store colors became rust as they were in the 1940s. Bags, gift boxes, fleet delivery trucks and even the backdrops of store counters (fine jewelry, for example, where jewelry would be displayed) reflected this. The slogan in the 1970s was "Foley's is magical, unpredictable, sensational, you know you want Foley's"

In 1984, the RH Macy company (the original, upscale Macy's, not the Kmart we have now) entered the Houston marketplace. Foley's and Joske's were historically the main competitors at area malls. Sometimes, (as was the case with Northline, Northwest, Almeda, The Galleria, Sharpstown, for instance) where there was a Foley's, there was not a Joske's. Foley's and Joske's would also compete with Sakowitz and Frost Brothers with some of their designer departments and fur salons. However, Macy's was new to the area and Foley's was preparing for the competition. They drew up a new slogan and logo to fight back, stressing their hometown roots. It was "At the heart of Texas...Foley's!" The new store colors became grey and white with a peach heart that was placed in the E. The asterisk/star was dropped altogether. Letters were all upper case and the E had no vertical line. Ads were on the airwaves and newspapers. I recall one ad that showed two yuppies running for a plane with luggage in hand. Behind them in black and white was a stage coach. "Texans have always knowns how to catch the next stage.. with luggage from Foley's". Macy's had their slogan "We're Macy's and we're a part of your life!". The Foley's Deerbrook was designed to go head to toe with the first Macy's at the same mall.

In 1986 Foley's introduced their "Foley's...of course!" campaign. It was a highly successful run that went on for many years. Many do not know they had the "of course" campaign many years prior in the 1930s or 1940s.

The next change came in 1987. Federated, which had owned Foley's since the 1940s, announced that Foley's would merge with her sister store, Sanger-Harris, in Dallas. Headquarters would remain in Houston and Sanger-Harris would be rebranded as Foley's. Foley's continued their "of course" campaign but added, at the bottom of the logo on bags "now including Sanger-Harris".

The merger was barely complete when corporate raider Campeau took over Allied Department Stores and dismantled, shut down and sold off many chains across the nation. Jordan Marsh and Joske's were 2 of the twenty some odd divisions that were affected. Dillard's purchased Joske's and promptly rebranded. Campeau, still not satisfied, raided Federated and took them over with junk bonds, as he had Allied. Foley's and Filene's (Boston) were promptly sold off to May Company. The Foley's we always knew would never be the same. Many departments were liquidated immediately. Those included the Fur Salons, jewelry and watch repair, junior accessories, Big and Tall, personal shopper, photo studio, beauty salons, sporting goods, books, toys, candy, carpets and floor coverings, pharmacy, records and tapes, major appliances and televisions. Federated had already shut down the Budget Store in 1985 in an attempt to move more upscale. The restaurants continued for a time. One by one, however, they started shuttering the branch store restaurants. This occured in the early 1990s. Downtown also lost The Grill (Men's Grill prior to the women's movement) on the 2nd floor, The Terrace on the 5th floor, Lunch Express across the street in the parking garage as well as the much frequented bakery.

May changed the typeface of the Foley's logo to reflect the same font as the other divisions. It was an upper case F with other letters lower case.

The Federated/Allied merger went bankrupt causing the consolidation and demise of hundreds of chains of department stores nationwide that had been the heritage of so many cities. The Federated that emerged from bankruptcy was not the old Federated. RH Macy had also gone bankrupt with the name being purchased by the new Federated. Federated bought May Company in 2006 and rebranded all May divisions to Macy's as they had with all the prior Federated chains, with the exception of Bloomingdale's.

Some may remember the sales that were specific to Foley's -- their anniversary sale in September, the "Remnant Days" sale (end of season clearances) and their annual White Sale.

I believe Foley's was the "Red Apple Sale" wasn't it? IIRC, Penney's was the brand featuring the "White Sale". Too many years...too few brain cells remain, I may be wrong.

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I believe Foley's was the "Red Apple Sale" wasn't it? IIRC, Penney's was the brand featuring the "White Sale". Too many years...too few brain cells remain, I may be wrong.

You are correct. However, The Red Apple Sale was originally a Sanger-Harris sale. When Foley's merged with Sanger-Harris they adopted it. I have an old catalogue from 1984's Foley's White Sale. I believe several department stores called their linen sales a white sale.

@Hydeaway: Hmm...there's a "Foley's Cooking Fiesta", so obviously, this was before the major downscaling.

IronTiger,

You are correct. Foley's used to have in-store cooking demonstrations. As you can see from the commercial, some were done by Ninfa Lorenzo of Ninfa's Restaurants. In 1984-85 Foley's had an exclusive line of dinnerware and cookware designed by Ninfa.

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@Hydeaway: Hmm...there's a "Foley's Cooking Fiesta", so obviously, this was before the major downscaling.

By the way, the commercial was made in 1984 at the Memorial City Foley's. This was the same year RH Macy entered the Houston market. Thus, the "Foley's is Texas, we're part of these parts" in the jingle was to combat the invasion by Macy's. Little did we know back then what would become what had always been across the country. Scores of department stores, literally thousands, used to dot the landscape nationwide defining regions. There was a tradition,history and uniqueness that has been lost with the consolidations. Now we are down to less than 10: Boscovs, Nordstrom, Von Maur, The Bon Ton, Dillards and the Kmart Macy's of today. I am not counting JCPenney and Sears as they have always been nationwide and not very unique in themselves.

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