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I moved here from quite a warm dry climate and vinyl fencing is all the rage. I drive by nice subdivisions and most often see wood fencing. It is ugly and becomes even more ugly as time and the elements have their way. Is it strictly a matter of cost or is there another reason I don't often, if ever, see vinyl fencing used here in H-town? I don't know the pricing of wood fencing, but do know vinyl fences can run from $10-$24 and higher per foot. It's a bit odd to see high end homes with $hitty wood fencing. Is it because it's cost prohibitive or is there a more practical reason for it not being used? I have read on some manufactureres websites that vinyl does not warp or mold, even in a hot, humid climate like ours.

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You apparently haven't been here long enough to experience a Hurricane hitting our fair coastline. At $20 a foot, replacing that can get a bit pricey my friend. Welcome to the forum.

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You apparently haven't been here long enough to experience a Hurricane hitting our fair coastline. At $20 a foot, replacing that can get a bit pricey my friend. Welcome to the forum.

Boy, am I a low-rent local or what--when he said vinyl fencing I thought of hurricane fence with the green vinyl inset.

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First of all, sorry I posted this in this thread. I just happened to be reading it when I hit the New Topic button. My bad. As far as hurricanes, I have been here for Rita and Ike. Does not insurance cover the cost of repair to fencing? I was very lucky and got no damage to my property from Ike and simply don't know what is covered. I should probably look into that...

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Since when does polyvinyl cloride

vinyl-fencing.jpg

look better than wood?

fence11_modern_horizontal_redwood_w.jpg

gate16_entry_contemporary_hortizont.jpg

And $20 a linear foot only gets you the materials for Vinyl fencing, you then need to install it, so go ahead and tack on another $12 to $14 to that number.

(Of course that beautiful redwood fence pictured above is probably $100/LF!)

Edited by rbarz
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Since when does polyvinyl cloride

vinyl-fencing.jpg

look better than wood?

fence11_modern_horizontal_redwood_w.jpg

gate16_entry_contemporary_hortizont.jpg

And $20 a linear foot only gets you the materials for Vinyl fencing, you then need to install it, so go ahead and tack on another $12 to $14 to that number.

(Of course that beautiful redwood fence pictured above is probably $100/LF!)

THAT is a nice wood fence!! I would gladly put that on my property and the vinyl fence you show is truly ugly. I've seen some very nice vinyl fencing and that's not it. The wood fences I'm talking about are the cheap untreated fences made from Dog knows what. Cedar? Pine? Balsa wood? Who knows but it turns gray and dreary with wear. I'm not sure of the life of a vinyl fence but I'll betcha it's longer than the lame wood fences. Just sayin...btw, are the photos above of a place located in the Houston area?

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It's an interesting question, and I think the real answer is somewhere in between cost and regional preference. There was a thread not too long ago asking why we don't use concrete block like neighborhoods (of all price ranges) do in the desert SW. There are a number of vinyl styles that I like, but I'm not going to spend the extra money for it and have my fence look completely different from that of my neighbors. Plus, doesn't it chip away pretty badly if hit with anything, like a weedeater?

IMO, If a builder used vinyl in a major neighborhood, in a big way, then you would probably see the trend start here. Until then, fancy is seen as a rot board and 2x4 cap across the top, LOL.

Edited by travelguy_73
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I wouldn't use vinyl fencing if you gave it to me. It is cheezy and plastic, and is the kind of thing I would expect the nouveau riche to use to surround their oversized and cheaply built McMansion. But, they sell it at Home Depot, complete with "faux wood grain" pressed into it, if that is your idea of living in high cotton.

Hope that answers your question.

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I moved here from quite a warm dry climate and vinyl fencing is all the rage. I drive by nice subdivisions and most often see wood fencing. It is ugly and becomes even more ugly as time and the elements have their way. Is it strictly a matter of cost or is there another reason I don't often, if ever, see vinyl fencing used here in H-town? I don't know the pricing of wood fencing, but do know vinyl fences can run from $10-$24 and higher per foot. It's a bit odd to see high end homes with $hitty wood fencing. Is it because it's cost prohibitive or is there a more practical reason for it not being used? I have read on some manufactureres websites that vinyl does not warp or mold, even in a hot, humid climate like ours.

I find it interesting how fences are so common in suburbs in Texas. I grew up in suburbia in the northeast, and nobody had a fence unless they had an underground swimming pool or a dog left outside. I'm still kind of perplexed as to why nearly everyone here needs to fence in their yards rather than use landscaping as a natural and more attractive visual barrier. But I guess that's for another topic...

Oh, I agree about the wood fencing. Once it gets discolored and warped it looks really truly bad. But I can also see the vinyl fence becoming stained with mold and mildew after a few summers in our climate. Personally, I think wrought iron looks far better than the alternatives, and it's virtually hurricane proof unless something falls on it.

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I find it interesting how fences are so common in suburbs in Texas. I grew up in suburbia in the northeast, and nobody had a fence unless they had an underground swimming pool or a dog left outside. I'm still kind of perplexed as to why nearly everyone here needs to fence in their yards rather than use landscaping as a natural and more attractive visual barrier. But I guess that's for another topic...

Good fences make good neighbors. Plus, you can walk around naked in the back yard without bugging folks.

Oh, I agree about the wood fencing. Once it gets discolored and warped it looks really truly bad. But I can also see the vinyl fence becoming stained with mold and mildew after a few summers in our climate. Personally, I think wrought iron looks far better than the alternatives, and it's virtually hurricane proof unless something falls on it.

And I love how old wood fences look. They have character and charm. Of course, I grew up with them, ya bunch of carpetbaggers.

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The neighbor a few doors down from me has this.

It was brand new and got torn down by Ike. They replaced it with the same stuff. I think it is hideous, but to each his/her own. Even before Ike, some of the panels got knocked down. I guess the installation wasn't done properly.

I also wonder if it will show dirt really easily as well.

Jason

Since when does polyvinyl cloride

vinyl-fencing.jpg

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I knew I'd get some strong opinions from HAIFer's. Don't worry, I have no interest in installing vinyl fencing. Just curious why I never saw it around. If I lived on a large lot in the burbs, I think a durable high quality vinyl picket or semi private fence would be nice, but it has to be appropriate with the neighborhood. The web site I found shows what looks to be much more durable than what you may find at Home Depot, not a pressed in wood grain anywhere to be seen. I would post the link, but I've already been reprimanded for using a dirty word. Not to mention, no one is interested in vinyl fencing!!

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It's not the material; it's the commercially available designs and applications. I could see vinyl being a material update on the international mod design paradigm of the 50's (think clean white abstracted planer surfaces). I'd have to talk to a fabricator or search through prefab catalogs before design/build.

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