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Metro approves $1.46 Billion for 20 miles of light rail


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I don't care who does or doesn't take me seriously and I'm definitely not on some mission to get random people on the internet to agree with me.

I simply made a prediction which will be borne out in due time. For the sake of the city of Houston I hope I am wrong.

The issue of which cities are Gen-Y friendly really should have been an easy one, but unfortunately the culture of superficiality and self-absorption seems to have pervaded even those places, and more importantly the speculators/glory hunters seem to have pre-emptively run Gen Y out ahead of time. So I don't have an easy answer -- sorry! -- I guess we'll all just have to wait and see :)

Edited by N Judah
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I don't care who does or doesn't take me seriously and I'm definitely not on some mission to get random people on the internet to agree with me.

I simply made a prediction which will be borne out in due time. For the sake of the city of Houston I hope I am wrong.

The issue of which cities are Gen-Y friendly really should have been an easy one, but unfortunately the culture of superficiality and self-absorption seems to have pervaded even those places, and more importantly the speculators/glory hunters seem to have pre-emptively run Gen Y out ahead of time. So I don't have an easy answer -- sorry! -- I guess we'll all just have to wait and see :)

I still think you're missing a substantial part of "the boat". As long as Houston is "Houston"... meaning a viable, affordable and transient city in which younger people can get out of college and start their professional life, Gen Y will be here. It's not like Gen Y is a small collection elitists that can only live in one city. Many Gen Y Houstonians may NOT want to stay here, but people from all over the world move to Houston on a daily basis b/c of the opportunities that the city affords.

And BTW, you should visit the East End sometime... go to an event at Talento Bilengue, catch a show at Bohemeo's, go on a mural tour, or go hear Opera Vista at the Barnevelder. All major parts of the Houston area arts scene... all in the EAST END.

On topic... the recent news of additional federal funding for the Southeast and North lines will help construction for the East End line... it frees up more money for METRO to use towards the other lines. And of course the East End line will merge with the Southeast Line going into downtown, so I'm glad they can start on that connection sooner.

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If you are going to rent, and other places are just as affordable as Houston, why stick around here? If jobs are just as hard to find anywhere, and you get stuck doing retail (or attending community college) until the recession blows over, why not live in a place where you don't have to own a car and where the weather is nice?

..."where the weather is nice".....

Houston is definitely hot & humid for months out of each year. But some parts of our fine country get really, really cold--with snow piled up & icy streets. Weather that can actually kill you.

What are the competing cities that have (1) 12 months of perfect weather, (2) affordable prices, (3) excellent mass transit* & (4) jobs?

* Metro actually works for getting to school or most day jobs. Not so good for clubbing, though. (How often do you take the bus?)

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Wall Street Journal yesterday had an article on youth magnets.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124242099361525009.html

According to their data between 2005 and 2007 only seven metropolitan areas added more college-educated migrants of any age than did Houston (with Austin and Dallas ahead). During the recession, between July 2007 and July 2008, Houston was one of only four places to still draw people along with Portland, Seattle and Denver. They explain it by high oil prices, so perhaps the same will happen again soon seeing that the prices started to rise again.

However, they admit that traditional youth magnets are losing their appeal as job markets. Some of the cities are successful at keeping up their appeal despite this. The main factors are apparently climate, natural beauty, universities, culture, nightlife and 'reputation as a cool place to live', whatever that is. I don't know about beauty and 'coolness', but the rest seems to apply to Houston.

As far as jobs right now Houston does not make the top ten

http://www.careercast.com/jobs/content/ten...ates-jobs-rated

New York is at the top and Washington, D.C. second, it is also high up in terms of affordability. The rest of top ten are also dense metropolitan areas, absence of Texas cities is noticeable. Things may change however when the recession is over. Even now economic factors are disregarded by many, see the WSJ article: "A lot of people figure there aren't jobs anywhere, so they might as well be where they want to be."

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  • 2 weeks later...
What are the competing cities that have (1) 12 months of perfect weather, (2) affordable prices, (3) excellent mass transit* & (4) jobs?

First of all, I'm not even sure where you're getting these criteria.

But assuming that such cities even exist, what makes you think Houston would be considered "competitive" with such places?

* Metro actually works for getting to school or most day jobs. Not so good for clubbing, though. (How often do you take the bus?)

All the time, but not nearly as often as I'd like. Why?

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Wall Street Journal yesterday had an article on youth magnets.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124242099361525009.html

According to their data between 2005 and 2007 only seven metropolitan areas added more college-educated migrants of any age than did Houston (with Austin and Dallas ahead). During the recession, between July 2007 and July 2008, Houston was one of only four places to still draw people along with Portland, Seattle and Denver. They explain it by high oil prices, so perhaps the same will happen again soon seeing that the prices started to rise again.

However, they admit that traditional youth magnets are losing their appeal as job markets. Some of the cities are successful at keeping up their appeal despite this. The main factors are apparently climate, natural beauty, universities, culture, nightlife and 'reputation as a cool place to live', whatever that is. I don't know about beauty and 'coolness', but the rest seems to apply to Houston.

As far as jobs right now Houston does not make the top ten

http://www.careercast.com/jobs/content/ten...ates-jobs-rated

New York is at the top and Washington, D.C. second, it is also high up in terms of affordability. The rest of top ten are also dense metropolitan areas, absence of Texas cities is noticeable. Things may change however when the recession is over. Even now economic factors are disregarded by many, see the WSJ article: "A lot of people figure there aren't jobs anywhere, so they might as well be where they want to be."

I am afraid that you missed the point of that jobs article completely. The Top 10 list was not a list of cities with jobs, but rather a Wish List of where graduating students would LIKE to find a job. The 2nd article may lend credence to N Judah's claim that young job seekers do not want to come to Houston. However, the first article is proof that available jobs trumps trendy cities every time.

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"Trumps" how, and for whose benefit?

The locations that people actually move to are an indicator of revealed preference, wherein peoples' priorities lead them to make the most all-around attractive choice for them as individuals. It is to the benefit of those that choose to move here that they move here.

If I could live anywhere on the planet earth, or even anywhere in Texas, and maintain a comfortable standard of living, it sure as hell wouldn't be Houston. It wouldn't be any of the cities on that list, either. But Houston has been good to me, and so here I am. If San Antonio or Austin could be so lucrative, I would move there.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Did anyone else see the Advertisment METRO has at chron.com??

It says

"READY TO ROLL"

Let's Celebrate METROS "Heyday"

Metro is ready to break ground

All the Pieces are in Place -

Houston, we're ready to roll!

And then it sends you to a video link of them announcing it in May

http://www.ridemetro.org/News/Broadcast/Pr...onferences.aspx

Is this ad new??

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Did anyone else see the Advertisment METRO has at chron.com??

It says

"READY TO ROLL"

Let's Celebrate METROS "Heyday"

Metro is ready to break ground

All the Pieces are in Place -

Houston, we're ready to roll!

And then it sends you to a video link of them announcing it in May

http://www.ridemetro.org/News/Broadcast/Pr...onferences.aspx

Is this ad new??

I think it is new. At least today is the first time I've noticed it.

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I think it is new. At least today is the first time I've noticed it.

I agree, heres the pdf. for the Transit-News Journal

http://www.ridemetro.org/AboutUs/Publicati...ournal-0609.pdf

"METRO is ready to break ground on the North and Southeast Corridors,

continue work on the East End Line and anticipating the construction of the University and Uptown corridors."

"All the pieces are in place--Houston, we're ready to roll."

Edited by citizen4rmptown
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I thought that Mayor White's comments about groundbreaking ceremonies were very apt, and I'd have liked to have been privy to the actual comments instead of METRO's paraphrased interpretation of them.

The undertone of his comment signaled to me that he was basically refusing to attend a METRO groundbreaking where the ground hadn't already been broken. And I strongly suspect that this roots back to the ceremony that was held to commemorate the beginning of work on the East End line, where everyone in attendance was basically made to look like a jackass when actual construction work didn't begin for many months following the ceremony and is still not very intensive.

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does getting money from the feds for the east and southeast lines increase the chances that the other lines will get built?

from the video, I was happy to hear that metro has made some purchases NOW for FUTURE stuff, to lock in the prices. And the idea of rewarding the companies AFTER construction is done, depending on how well they mitigated potentional problems is a great idea.

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does getting money from the feds for the east and southeast lines increase the chances that the other lines will get built?

from the video, I was happy to hear that metro has made some purchases NOW for FUTURE stuff, to lock in the prices. And the idea of rewarding the companies AFTER construction is done, depending on how well they mitigated potentional problems is a great idea.

It was the north and southeast lines that got full funding. This does take some pressure off of METRO. As you recall, they got themselves in a budgetary quandary as a consequence of trying to hedge fuel prices at their peak. And their funding comes primarily from sales taxes, which are forecasted to decline. These were issues on their radar, and by eliminating a fairly significant portion of their capital outlays it should give them more leeway to execute the other projects that they are trying to take on concurrently. Maybe we'll finally see meaningful progress on Harrisburg.

I can't help but wonder what the Houston delegation of legislators gave up to achieve this kind of favoritism. I also wonder whether it is completely a done deal. Does a presidential recommendation constitute success, or is there another level of approval or oversight that has to be cleared?

EDIT: By chance, I noticed this quote in a Chronicle article from yesterday. Makes you wonder...

Speaking of stimulus funds, I gave you outdated information in last week’s column. Metro cannot use $30 million of federal stimulus funds on building the new light rail lines, despite what the agency had expected (and we had reported) earlier. In fact, none of the stimulus can be used on the future rail expansion. That’s because Metro doesn’t yet have final approval from the Federal Transit Administration for the planned North and Southeast rail lines.
Edited by TheNiche
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It was the north and southeast lines that got full funding. This does take some pressure off of METRO. As you recall, they got themselves in a budgetary quandary as a consequence of trying to hedge fuel prices at their peak. And their funding comes primarily from sales taxes, which are forecasted to decline. These were issues on their radar, and by eliminating a fairly significant portion of their capital outlays it should give them more leeway to execute the other projects that they are trying to take on concurrently. Maybe we'll finally see meaningful progress on Harrisburg.

I can't help but wonder what the Houston delegation of legislators gave up to achieve this kind of favoritism. I also wonder whether it is completely a done deal. Does a presidential recommendation constitute success, or is there another level of approval or oversight that has to be cleared?

EDIT: By chance, I noticed this quote in a Chronicle article from yesterday. Makes you wonder...

The guy in the video said projections for sales tax was that they would decline but they have not, they've actually increased, as of now.

He also mentioned that 100 transit agencies were lined up to request federal funding and that only 5 projects received it. Houston got 2 of 5. Impressive

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The guy in the video said projections for sales tax was that they would decline but they have not, they've actually increased, as of now.

No, not as of now. As of the end of the third quarter of last year. It takes a surprisingly long time for the State to put out reliable estimates of sales tax revenues at the local level. And that was basically our peak (here in Texas). Since that time, the consumer psychology and the business environment have deteriorated markedly. There was an article in the Chronicle just yesterday that pointed out that we've now shed more jobs in the past twelve months than in any other twelve-month period since the 80's. Sales tax collections have declined rapidly in previous local recessionary environments; there is good cause to believe that the same experience is being had right now.

He also mentioned that 100 transit agencies were lined up to request federal funding and that only 5 projects received it. Houston got 2 of 5. Impressive

On the face of it, yes. That would be impressive. But you'll also notice that he profusely thanks the local delegation of legislators. And he certainly doesn't go into the underlying merits of these lines, which frankly are peripheral to the core system and have dubious ridership projections, yet have been so well-received politically. I smell a back room deal. And I have to wonder at what our leverage was.

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Back room deal or not, this is badass! I'm excited to see some construction!

I want to see integrity among our elected officials, but I smell a rat. There's no such thing as a free lunch.

Moreover, I am not interested in diseased cellulite-ridden bad ass.

Edited by TheNiche
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On the face of it, yes. That would be impressive. But you'll also notice that he profusely thanks the local delegation of legislators. And he certainly doesn't go into the underlying merits of these lines, which frankly are peripheral to the core system and have dubious ridership projections, yet have been so well-received politically. I smell a back room deal. And I have to wonder at what our leverage was.

I seem to recall a certain very vocal HAIF poster taking others to task for suggesting this same behavior on the part of a local Republican congressman. Might I challenge you in the same way that you challenged them?

Put up or shut up. :)

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I seem to recall a certain very vocal HAIF poster taking others to task for suggesting this same behavior on the part of a local Republican congressman. Might I challenge you in the same way that you challenged them?

Put up or shut up. :)

I only smell a rat. I have not purported to have observed or documented it. I have neither named names, nor have I made specific accusations. That is very different from the thread that you're talking about where specific accusations were made by others based on a completely speculative or otherwise dubious evidence.

That I called those people out on a poorly-conceived and highly specific accusation does not mean that I am incapable of general suspicion, and nor should I be. A suspicious and vigilant citizenry is key to the maintenance of an effective representative government.

Edited by TheNiche
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Pot, meet kettle.

Let me try to be more clear. Some people claimed in the thread you're referring to:

'Person A' was bribed by 'Entity B' to perform 'Act C'. The accusation was that there was impropriety, however evidence was circumstantial and no meaningful attempt was made to evaluate whether 'Act C' was not otherwise in the interests of either his constituency or the general public.

In contrast, my core argument is that:

In light of unlikely 'Event A' occurring, I consider the likelihood of impropriety to be high. Furthermore, I suspect that impropriety is more likely to be sourced to certain quarters of government than others, although it is unclear as to which individuals may or may not have participated.

I hope you can see the difference, here. I am broadly suspicious of many among a particular group of people but am not by any means willing to say that it was Sheila Jackson-Lee in the Conservatory with the Candlestick.

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I hope you can see the difference, here.

Yes, the difference is clear. Transit agencies who get federal money for projects are suspicious. Republican congressmen who get money for highway projects are not. Thanks for clearing that up. I hadn't noticed that trend in your previous 10,100 posts.

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Yes, the difference is clear. Transit agencies who get federal money for projects are suspicious. Republican congressmen who get money for highway projects are not. Thanks for clearing that up. I hadn't noticed that trend in your previous 10,100 posts.

You've missed the point. But I'm not going to get personal by pointing out how many posts you've got or that I should have come to expect this kind of behavior (when it's convenient to you) by now.

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Here, I'll do it for you. I have nearly 10,000 posts, and am known on this forum to be in favor of mass transit. I also recognize that, while the poor will ride ANY transit, to expand ridership, a transit agency must offer modes that appeal to a wider range of people. I do not find METRO's success at obtaining federal funding to be nefarious, mostly because I do not find METRO itself nefarious.

Regardless what point you are TRYING to make, your disdain for METRO and its goals show in that you find fault in their every success...as well as their stumbles. Your opinions are tainted because of such views. Sorry if it offends you that the secret is out, but you haven't done a good job of hiding it. MY point still stands.

I will now abandon the thread so that you may furiously attempt to put the cat back into the bag. :rolleyes:

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Here, I'll do it for you. I have nearly 10,000 posts, and am known on this forum to be in favor of mass transit. I also recognize that, while the poor will ride ANY transit, to expand ridership, a transit agency must offer modes that appeal to a wider range of people. I do not find METRO's success at obtaining federal funding to be nefarious, mostly because I do not find METRO itself nefarious.

Regardless what point you are TRYING to make, your disdain for METRO and its goals show in that you find fault in their every success...as well as their stumbles. Your opinions are tainted because of such views. Sorry if it offends you that the secret is out, but you haven't done a good job of hiding it. MY point still stands.

I will now abandon the thread so that you may furiously attempt to put the cat back into the bag. :rolleyes:

I fail to understand how one's perspective on a matter is more relevant than the interpretation of facts at hand. Just because one has bias does not necessarily mean that they are wrong.

I mean, at the very least, one would hope that a person's perspective is rooted in experience and reasoned opinion. And hopefully there's enough internal consistency that the opinion is expressed regularly and predictably. I have plenty such opinions (those expressed in this and other related threads among them) but do not understand why that should be held against me.

Edited by TheNiche
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No, not as of now. As of the end of the third quarter of last year. It takes a surprisingly long time for the State to put out reliable estimates of sales tax revenues at the local level. And that was basically our peak (here in Texas). Since that time, the consumer psychology and the business environment have deteriorated markedly. There was an article in the Chronicle just yesterday that pointed out that we've now shed more jobs in the past twelve months than in any other twelve-month period since the 80's. Sales tax collections have declined rapidly in previous local recessionary environments; there is good cause to believe that the same experience is being had right now.

Hmmm...or maybe not.

http://houston.bizjournals.com/houston/sto...04/daily54.html

Houston received $45.7 million for its allotment, up 1.2 percent from the comparable period a year ago.

Since Houston sale tax receipts went up, it is a fair assumption that so did METRO's.

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Since Houston sale tax receipts went up, it is a fair assumption that so did METRO's.

You brought up a fair counterpoint worthy of discussion (finally!) (and only after you first said that you were bailing out of this thread :rolleyes:).

I misheard what was said in the video, so let's go back over it and clear things up.

From the video: Barton Smith projected a decline of sales tax revenues from sales taxes of 4.6% for Fiscal Year 2009. Actuals reflect a 5% increase in sales tax revenues during the first 8 months of FY 2009. Smith projects that sales tax revenues will be down 4% in the 2010 FY, and METRO is sticking with that projection.

I had heard something about the first eight months of the fiscal year and immediately thought that they were talking about the last calendar year. In actuality, METRO's fiscal year starts in October. And since the Texas Comptroller's web-based resource I've always used for economic research, which reflects final data, is always so out of date, that fit into my CY/FY error. And actually, if you read the footnotes on the validity of sales tax reports, the Comptroller points out that it takes so long to finalize the data because "1. Returns are not due until the 20th of the month following the close of a quarter and we wait about a month after this date to begin compiling data so we will pick up as many late filers as possible. 2. Information from taxpayers' returns goes through a lengthy verification process to ensure the accuracy of the sales tax database." ...which is to say, that the monthly reports are preliminary and prone to a fair bit of error.

From the 6-week-old article you posted: "Ten local transit systems received $120.8 million in April sales tax payments, down 3.8 percent compared with a year ago." I would tend to believe that that's going to get a whole lot worse before it gets better.

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You brought up a fair counterpoint worthy of discussion (finally!) (and only after you first said that you were bailing out of this thread :rolleyes:).

I misheard what was said in the video, so let's go back over it and clear things up.

From the video: Barton Smith projected a decline of sales tax revenues from sales taxes of 4.6% for Fiscal Year 2009. Actuals reflect a 5% increase in sales tax revenues during the first 8 months of FY 2009. Smith projects that sales tax revenues will be down 4% in the 2010 FY, and METRO is sticking with that projection.

I had heard something about the first eight months of the fiscal year and immediately thought that they were talking about the last calendar year. In actuality, METRO's fiscal year starts in October. And since the Texas Comptroller's web-based resource I've always used for economic research, which reflects final data, is always so out of date, that fit into my CY/FY error. And actually, if you read the footnotes on the validity of sales tax reports, the Comptroller points out that it takes so long to finalize the data because "1. Returns are not due until the 20th of the month following the close of a quarter and we wait about a month after this date to begin compiling data so we will pick up as many late filers as possible. 2. Information from taxpayers' returns goes through a lengthy verification process to ensure the accuracy of the sales tax database." ...which is to say, that the monthly reports are preliminary and prone to a fair bit of error.

From the 6-week-old article you posted: "Ten local transit systems received $120.8 million in April sales tax payments, down 3.8 percent compared with a year ago." I would tend to believe that that's going to get a whole lot worse before it gets better.

Actually, I saw more tax totals after I posted that link. Of the 10 transit districts, only 2 had increases. Those were METRO, at about 3.5%, and Corpus Christi, slightly lower. Every other entity was negative. I also found data that suggested that the Houston area tax receipts were still increasing through March. April's preliminary receipts are the first month to go negative. Though the number will increase as late filers are counted, it probably will not go positive. This is actually very much in line with the jobs numbers, which showed Houston adding jobs through February. The negative yearly number is completely the result of the last 3 months.

In comparison, METRO and Houston have fared far better than DART and Dallas, where sales tax revenue has been negative since the 3rd quarter of 2008. I read somewhere that DART is trying to close a $46 million funding gap due to lost revenue. In light of all of these numbers, METRO's 4% figure doesn't seem out of line at all.

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Just spotted this on the Metro Website, they are inviting everyone at Minute Maid Park for a kick off of the construction! Link!

I might have to attend this little wingding. Doubt they will have info on the other lines. sad.gif

I wish they did these things on the weekend, but I'm sure there's a reason they don't.

Take pictures.

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Actually, I saw more tax totals after I posted that link. Of the 10 transit districts, only 2 had increases. Those were METRO, at about 3.5%, and Corpus Christi, slightly lower. Every other entity was negative. I also found data that suggested that the Houston area tax receipts were still increasing through March. April's preliminary receipts are the first month to go negative. Though the number will increase as late filers are counted, it probably will not go positive. This is actually very much in line with the jobs numbers, which showed Houston adding jobs through February. The negative yearly number is completely the result of the last 3 months.

In comparison, METRO and Houston have fared far better than DART and Dallas, where sales tax revenue has been negative since the 3rd quarter of 2008. I read somewhere that DART is trying to close a $46 million funding gap due to lost revenue. In light of all of these numbers, METRO's 4% figure doesn't seem out of line at all.

according to 13 news...sale tax revenues are down approxmately 11% from the same time last year.

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I think that was for the whole state for June. Don't think we know the local numbers yet.

That is correct.

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=news/state&id=6910983

Though, it is worth noting that sales tax revenue for METRO went from positive to -5% in about a month, so it is certainly possible that sales tax has eroded quickly enough to drop 11%.

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I wish they did these things on the weekend, but I'm sure there's a reason they don't.

Take pictures.

I thought the groundbreaking or some sort of important dedication for the Southeast line happened about a year or two ago. I remember singing with my church choir at Palm Center and witnessing a ribbon cutting ceremony of a banner for Metro. I was even interviewed by the Chron while I was there. If this is the official ceremony, what was all of that for?

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I thought the groundbreaking or some sort of important dedication for the Southeast line happened about a year or two ago. I remember singing with my church choir at Palm Center and witnessing a ribbon cutting ceremony of a banner for Metro. I was even interviewed by the Chron while I was there. If this is the official ceremony, what was all of that for?

Maybe the opening of the Southeast Corridor office?

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CROWDS PACK UNION STATION TO CELEBRATE METRO’S

HISTORIC GROUNDBREAKING OF THE NORTH AND SOUTHEAST LINES

Cheers rang loudly at Union Station this morning as supporters joined METRO in celebrating the start of two momentous light-rail projects that will connect communities like never before – the North and Southeast corridors.

Traveling from the nation’s capital to the Bayou City to participate in the festivities were U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX), Congressman Gene Green (D-TX), Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) and Congressman Al Green (D-TX). Joining the delegation were Mayor Bill White and Houston City Council members, as well as METRO Board Chairman David S. Wolff and METRO Board members.

The congressional delegation echoed Chairman Wolff’s comment on the importance of the groundbreaking, indicating it will spur economic growth in the community to the tune of 60,000 direct and indirect jobs under the full $1.46 billion contract. The initial phase of the contract calls for spending $632 million and is expected to create 25,000 jobs.

Small and local businesses are expected to receive $300 million to $385 million in eligible contract work.

The speakers also honed in on the significance of $150 million set aside in President Obama’s FY2010 budget to help build the North and Southeast lines. The two rail lines were among five transit projects in the nation selected to receive funding.

The day of celebration kicked off with two separate ceremonies at the North and Southeast corridors, as well as a reception at the East End corridor. Participants from each corridor event were then transported via METRO buses to the grand finale at Union Station at Minute Maid Park.

At the North Corridor event, Chairman Wolff announced that the first work order for $121 million has officially been signed. That means initial construction on the North and Southeast lines is expected to get underway in the coming days. Activity on the East End line, which is already under construction, will increase.

All three lines – the North, Southeast and East End - are slated to be completed by 2012, and will add approximately 14 miles of light rail to METRO’s existing Main Street Red Line.

METRO’s light-rail expansion project will better connect communities and residents to jobs, health care centers, universities and more. The new light-rail lines will also give people another option to driving vehicles, helping improve the city’s air quality.

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Well, the fact that it's a separate contract doesn't excuse METRO from being up front with taxpayers about what's happening. I mean, I'm as pro-light rail as they come and I'm steamed about it, so I can only imagine what rail sceptics are thinking when they see METRO acting in this way. I know they have had to do battle with powerful anti-rail interests, but scattering sections of rail all over the city with little apparent thought to how they might best relate to each other in terms of the order in which they are built, is a waste of everyone's time, whether they are for light rail or against it.

Does anyone know if the University and Uptown line is still expected to finish by 2012 as well? On the website, it says all of phase 2 should be finished by 2012 but like some other people said, it's kind of confusing that they didn't at least mention these lines at the ceremony...

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Does anyone know if the University and Uptown line is still expected to finish by 2012 as well? On the website, it says all of phase 2 should be finished by 2012 but like some other people said, it's kind of confusing that they didn't at least mention these lines at the ceremony...

Channel 11 newscasters said 2013 on University and Uptown lines (the comments occurred after the KHOU video clip online).

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