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Home At 5650 Dumfries Dr.


domus48

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Is there a possibility a fellow devotee of post-war modern who lives near this structure could provide some photo documentation before this property is demolished? I would be a shame for this home to disappear without some sort of record. I would likely be able to go there this weekend but by then it may be too late... if it isn't already.

Edited by domus48
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I got some pics. I got there as the guy from JTB (the company hired to tear down the house) was unloading the "wrecking ball" so to speak. I'll get the pics up within a couple days.

flipper

PS. If anyone gets upset at the builder for the destruction of this house, redirect it to the previous homeowners who neglected the crap out of this place and turned it into a "tear-down". It was destructed long before JTB showed up.

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Not to completely derail, but is JTB the 'only' demo company in town? They just knocked one down across the street from me a couple of days ago and I was thinking about how every house I see go here (in Bellaire) always has the JTB sign in the yard.

No, they are not the only one. They are competitively priced and get the job done quick though. Maybe they get so much business because of those signs :)

Sign1.jpg

flipper

Edited by flipper
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Special thanks to "flipper" for taking the time to document this compelling structure... this home was clearly unique and possesses interesting details -- especially with respect to the use of stone, terrazzo and glazing.

It is very unfortunate this one was not on the radar with respect to potential buyers looking for a post modern home in this area. However, given the deplorable condition of this home -- and believe me: If it looks bad, it's actually worse. I would estimate that it would take at least the purchase price (at a minimum) to have restored this home. In all likelihood, even more cash outlay.

That said, it would be of value to research this home to discover it's provenance. There seems to be a bit too many unique features for a spec home... who was the architect? Who was the home build for? Or was this edifice a showcase home? Does it appear on any Parade of Homes listings?

Anyone care to dig a little?

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Another point about this house, and other houses in the 100 year flood plain...

When you get a building permit down at the code enforcement office, they pull up the flood maps and see if the project is in the flood plain. They will not let you spend more than "X" on a project that is in the flood plain. I believe "X" is 1/2 the value of the existing structure. I'm only 50% sure on that value though. Even if the rule was that you can't spend more than 100% of the value of the existing structure, this house was doomed.

It was very nasty inside.

flipper

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Thanks, Flipper, for the pictures. It was obviously a great house & it's sad that it was neglected so.

Also, sevfiv, that's so funny about the sign. Even though I've seen them a million times, and obviously remembered JTB - I never noticed their little graphics. "The wrecking ball against the city, the bulldozer against the world" is going to be part of my vocabulary now.

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"Another point about this house, and other houses in the 100 year flood plain...

When you get a building permit down at the code enforcement office, they pull up the flood maps and see if the project is in the flood plain. They will not let you spend more than "X" on a project that is in the flood plain. I believe "X" is 1/2 the value of the existing structure."

Good point. In the design profession it is incumbent to perform due diligence with respect to a clients intent on a given project -- that said, no one worth their salt would ever encourage or wave-off the implications of living in the 100 year flood plain. There are plenty of misconceptions about this item but one aspect should be made clear above all else: If a property has flooded once, it will flood again... and if it hasn't flooded, it will.

Anyone living within a 100 year flood plan -- in a home that is not elevated to a reasonable degree -- will eventually find water in their home. The degree of which depends but you can bank on the fact that 6" of water and the associated remediation is not all that different than 3'-0" of water -- the cost and impact will likely be equal or close.

To close: Let's try to keep the original topic on coarse -- that of this homes story -- rather than deviate into a flood plain discussion (which I'm sure it will).

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Another point about this house, and other houses in the 100 year flood plain...

When you get a building permit down at the code enforcement office, they pull up the flood maps and see if the project is in the flood plain. They will not let you spend more than "X" on a project that is in the flood plain. I believe "X" is 1/2 the value of the existing structure. I'm only 50% sure on that value though. Even if the rule was that you can't spend more than 100% of the value of the existing structure, this house was doomed.

It was very nasty inside.

flipper

Does that rule have any effect on what new construction could go there? Limits on cost of house, construction standards (raised above grade, etc.) or anything like that?

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Does that rule have any effect on what new construction could go there? Limits on cost of house, construction standards (raised above grade, etc.) or anything like that?

I believe the elevation of the house and how it relates to the elevation of adjacent properties is all that matters for new construction.

flipper

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That's upsetting. I've been looking for a cool modern for sale in Meyerland for several years now. I wish I would have seen this one.

5650 Dumfries is in the Barkley Square subdivision, not Meyerland. There are several flat roof contemporary style houses in Barkley Square with this same overall layout but detailed differently. Some have the front court yard left open, while others have solar block walls screening the front courtyard. One has the low hanging light fixtures like William Jenkins often used. The poured in place type bath tub seen here was another detail Jenkins sometimes included.

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flipper what was the exterior siding???looks like plywood with battens?? My house has the same siding of plywood, but I think they are mimicking whatever was there originally. Just never sure what they were trying to achieve.

To me the house doesnt look that bad..I mean its just wood, concrete and sheetrock.

I would hate to hear what others thought of my house when I bought it. Well guess I already have on another thread

Edited by GREASER
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flipper what was the exterior siding???looks like plywood with battens?? My house has the same siding of plywood, but I think they are mimicking whatever was there originally. Just never sure what they were trying to achieve.

To me the house doesnt look that bad..I mean its just wood, concrete and sheetrock.

I would hate to hear what others thought of my house when I bought it. Well guess I already have on another thread

I think it was 1x16 cedar with battens. The outside was decent. The inside would be decent if you removed everything and started from scratch.

flipper

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