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sifuwong

On a boat in the middle of hurricane Ike

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I might suspect being ON a boat might be safer than being on land surround by a lot of flying projectiles.. a boat just has to worry about taking on water/capsizing.. at least there won't be any trees falling on it..

Edited by Zippy

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Those wimps should have rode it out in the gulf.

Swells in the gulf were 81 feet at one point. So, uh...no.

I've wondered before what riding out a hurricane would be like from a kayak on the bay.

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Swells in the gulf were 81 feet at one point. So, uh...no.

I've wondered before what riding out a hurricane would be like from a kayak on the bay.

Judging by how much a slight breeze can push you around in a kayak, I'd say that riding out a hurricane on the bay would end up as a quick ride to some inland destination like Santa Fe or League City. :o

I went out in West Bay earlier this summer, and the winds kicked up while I was out there. In a short amount of time there were waves crashing across the kayak and it was tough to paddle in. I learned my lesson...always check the weather before heading out to the bay.

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Swells in the gulf were 81 feet at one point. So, uh...no.

I've wondered before what riding out a hurricane would be like from a kayak on the bay.

That's what I'm saying. It didn't look too bad in the bay.

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Unless you are on a large cruise ship or cargo ship, it is really stupid to be on the water during a hurricane. With over 80mph winds it doen't take much for a boat to capsize.

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Unless you are on a large cruise ship or cargo ship, it is really stupid to be on the water during a hurricane. With over 80mph winds it doen't take much for a boat to capsize.

Cruise ship or cargo ship? Yeah right. If a ship is parallel to the waves, it can be capsized by the 81 foot swells. If it is parallel, the pitching from the swells can split it clean in two midship.

Here is a quite riveting account of a Coast Guard rescue of TWO tankers that split in two in the same storm off New England in 1952, complete with photos.

"A ship broke in two last night!"

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