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I am curious about how lower Galleria (mainly the area surrounded by Fountain View, South Rice, Bellaire blvd and Westpark) will look like in 10-15 years. Do you guys think apartments in this area will be demolished and new townhomes and condos will take their place? The location is perfect, but area is full with low income apartments . Is it a good idea to buy some land or an apartment complex right now before the gentrification takes place?

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I am curious about how lower Galleria (mainly the area surrounded by Fountain View, South Rice, Bellaire blvd and Westpark) will look like in 10-15 years. Do you guys think apartments in this area will be demolished and new townhomes and condos will take their place? The location is perfect, but area is full with low income apartments . Is it a good idea to buy some land or an apartment complex right now before the gentrification takes place?

Now is not the time. Give it about another year before you start bottom feeding.

Gentrification will be a while in coming, however.

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I'm sure it will happen, but it will just gradually happen. The location is very good, especially with the light rail coming along eventually and the proximity to the core. It seems Bellaire's (the city) affluence has gradually moved north which could serve, along with Uptown to eventually engulf the area alongside 610 under 59S.

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The area you've outlined is not lower Galleria, it is moreso east Gulfton. For the most part these complexes have not changed since they were built in the late 70's/early 80's. The ground situation is dangerous at night w/in the complexes, especially towards the western end of your outlined area. There has been some nice developments like the sam's club or the adjacent 3 story complex off S. Rice. There is some potential in the warehouse location across from Bubba's and for that matter the eastern properties along S. Rice.

With the presence of high rise condos & gated neighborhoods across the freeway, it will be some significant amount of time before this area gentrifies.

Edited by infinite_jim
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I just can not believe some developer did not demolish old apartments for low income people and build nice townhomes. For god's sakes you have apartments for rent around $500 located 3-4 blocks away from the Galleria border. Unbelievable. There must be some kind of zoning or city regulation that keeps developers out of there. It is my guess of course.

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I just can not believe some developer did not demolish old apartments for low income people and build nice townhomes. For god's sakes you have apartments for rent around $500 located 3-4 blocks away from the Galleria border. Unbelievable. There must be some kind of zoning or city regulation that keeps developers out of there. It is my guess of course.

:lol:

New to Houston?

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With the presence of high rise condos & gated neighborhoods across the freeway, it will be some significant amount of time before this area gentrifies.

That said, the freeway is the new "other side of the tracks"

Same can be said for the Memorial City area, just north of the I-10 along Gessner is run down, whereas south along Gessner is where all the desirable developments are.

Come to think of it, both I-10 and 59 used to have rail lines along side of it.

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That said, the freeway is the new "other side of the tracks"

Same can be said for the Memorial City area, just north of the I-10 along Gessner is run down, whereas south along Gessner is where all the desirable developments are.

Come to think of it, both I-10 and 59 used to have rail lines along side of it.

Except for those random little pockets of bazillionaire "Villages" like Spring Valley and Hilshire Village, that is. ^_^

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I've thought it odd that surrounding the multi-billion dollar value of the Galleria area, you have such trashy apartments. Never quite understood how that happened?

They were there before the Galleria area Uptown really started becoming what it is today. They were nice at one point, just the people who maintain them are slum lords and don't update it, but they keep it affordable, and hence attract people of low income status.

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They were there before the Galleria area Uptown really started becoming what it is today. They were nice at one point, just the people who maintain them are slum lords and don't update it, but they keep it affordable, and hence attract people of low income status.

Yeah, I guess you're right. But it seems like market forces would make the land more valuable for more valuable developments. At some point you'd think they'd want to make more money with better apartments or condos?

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Yeah, I guess you're right. But it seems like market forces would make the land more valuable for more valuable developments. At some point you'd think they'd want to make more money with better apartments or condos?

They have. I've seen several old apartment blocks around the Galleria replaced by more expensive digs, but the land values don't increase over time in a straight line. Land gets more valuable, then it loses value. The decision to replace an earning property involves some risk, and the market forces haven't been strong enough to minimize that risk.

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They have. I've seen several old apartment blocks around the Galleria replaced by more expensive digs, but the land values don't increase over time in a straight line. Land gets more valuable, then it loses value. The decision to replace an earning property involves some risk, and the market forces haven't been strong enough to minimize that risk.

True.

About 4 blocks west of Richmond @ 610 and it is a funky looking neighborhood. I think the strip joints and t*tty bars don't help much?

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I thought this topic was going to be about the lower level of the Galleria. Please, when we refer to this area of town, can we all begin using the term Uptown? It's a pet peeve of mine that people refer to Uptown as "the Galleria" when the Galleria is truly just a set of attached buildings in Uptown.

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Everything has a place in God's magnificent plan.

AMEN.

I thought this topic was going to be about the lower level of the Galleria. Please, when we refer to this area of town, can we all begin using the term Uptown? It's a pet peeve of mine that people refer to Uptown as "the Galleria" when the Galleria is truly just a set of attached buildings in Uptown.

Up until about 10 years ago, it was just called "the Galleria". "Uptown" grew up around the Galleria.

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I thought this topic was going to be about the lower level of the Galleria. Please, when we refer to this area of town, can we all begin using the term Uptown? It's a pet peeve of mine that people refer to Uptown as "the Galleria" when the Galleria is truly just a set of attached buildings in Uptown.

In my mind The Galleria came first. So, no ...

I still have a hard time understanding exactly where Uptown is. I always thought it was just the area where all the new restaurants are, but it seems the definition and boundaries keep changing.

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I thought this topic was going to be about the lower level of the Galleria. Please, when we refer to this area of town, can we all begin using the term Uptown? It's a pet peeve of mine that people refer to Uptown as "the Galleria" when the Galleria is truly just a set of attached buildings in Uptown.

The "Galleria area", though, is sometimes more useful of a descriptor. For instance, the first map shown below is the Uptown Management District. The second map shown below is the Uptown TIRZ. And neither of these includes the areas around Riverway, the office complex along St. James Pl., or the areas immediately inside the Loop such as the Westcreek redevelopment or the area around the Park Towers.

maps-District_Boundary2.gif

maps-TIRZ_Boundary2.gif

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I thought this topic was going to be about the lower level of the Galleria. Please, when we refer to this area of town, can we all begin using the term Uptown? It's a pet peeve of mine that people refer to Uptown as "the Galleria" when the Galleria is truly just a set of attached buildings in Uptown.

But then we would be discussing lower Uptown, which is confusing because it sounds like it might be next to upper Downtown, or just another name for Midtown.

Uptown is a silly name for the Galleria area. Let's not use it.

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But then we would be discussing lower Uptown, which is confusing because it sounds like it might be next to upper Downtown, or just another name for Midtown.

Uptown is a silly name for the Galleria area. Let's not use it.

Yeah, I always thought it was a weird name since it is WEST of downtown, not north.

Up(per) to me, denotes something above, not west, of a destination.

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Yeah, I always thought it was a weird name since it is WEST of downtown, not north.

Up(per) to me, denotes something above, not west, of a destination.

North isn't really up - only on a map the way we usually hold them. You can look at a map upside down, still see the same area, but then South is up...

http://flourish.org/upsidedownmap/

More confusing would be why is midtown not between downtown and uptown?

Edited by CSOM
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Yeah, I always thought it was a weird name since it is WEST of downtown, not north.

Up(per) to me, denotes something above, not west, of a destination.

"Up" and "Above" do not qualify as cardinal directions.

The words "Uptown" and "Downtown" don't generally make much sense unless there's topography. Otherwise, one part of town cannot physically be above another on the axis which would measure altitude. I suppose an exception could be made for a town situated along a flowing river, in which case that portion of town that is further upriver could be considered Uptown.

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"Up" and "Above" do not qualify as cardinal directions.

The words "Uptown" and "Downtown" don't generally make much sense unless there's topography. Otherwise, one part of town cannot physically be above another on the axis which would measure altitude. I suppose an exception could be made for a town situated along a flowing river, in which case that portion of town that is further upriver could be considered Uptown.

Well, yes and no.

Westheimer. There is an Upper and Lower Westheimer. Lower is east of Upper, right?

Same for Kirby. Just that Upper (if I am not mistaken) is north of Lower in this case.

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Interesting - and it doesn't have to do with street number since "lower" Westheimer is in the smaller numbers, yet "upper" Kirby is as well.

At least in Chicago, Upper and lower Wacker refer to the actual physical placement of the road.

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. I read this article at the chron today about Bellaire's "mixed-use neighborhood centered around a proposed light-rail station on Westpark between South Rice and the West Loop." Hopefully this project will come to frution as the light rail gets started. With Uptown to the north and Bellaire to the south, the area the OP mentioned will eventually turn around.

Chron

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Wikipedia entriez.

Uptown

Midtown none?

Downtown

Written top to bottom for your convenienze?

Seems like Manhattan was the inspiration for the naming we know and use today. But uptown kinda has an upscale connotation to it now.

Houston's "Uptown" used to be South Main around the Shamrock, but in the 1990s the name was appropriated by the Galleria area because they felt, as you, that it had an "upscale" connotation to it. Geography had nothing to do with it - it was a marketing gimmick.

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. I read this article at the chron today about Bellaire's "mixed-use neighborhood centered around a proposed light-rail station on Westpark between South Rice and the West Loop." Hopefully this project will come to frution as the light rail gets started. With Uptown to the north and Bellaire to the south, the area the OP mentioned will eventually turn around.

Chron

Great link dmoneybangbang, but your Chron.com link has %20http: in it, thus the link is broken.

Here is the correct link.

BELLAIRE

City

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The "Galleria area", though, is sometimes more useful of a descriptor. For instance, the first map shown below is the Uptown Management District. The second map shown below is the Uptown TIRZ. And neither of these includes the areas around Riverway, the office complex along St. James Pl., or the areas immediately inside the Loop such as the Westcreek redevelopment or the area around the Park Towers.

maps-District_Boundary2.gif

maps-TIRZ_Boundary2.gif

Hence why I like the term "Uptown." It has defined boundaries, and you have to agree that most of the time people use the term "Galleria" as a geographic description, they mean Uptown. However, in instanbul's description, neither Galleria or Uptown really describes the area. I've never heard the term "Lower" Galleria which is why I thought we were going to be discussing the ice rink. "Lower" Uptown would've made more sense, but still not the right area.

I guess the area in question is not named. In true HAIFer form we oughtta be able to come up with a name for the area. How about SOUP (South of Uptown)? :lol:

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  • 4 weeks later...

Back on topic....the area you have described has been a cash cow for many years for a very limited group of ownership...the values in the Gulfton area have been stable whereas the price per sf on the dirt does not exceed the value of the improvements, i.e. cash flow....the area that could be know as "lower galleria" (north of 59 and south of Westheimer) has experienced a renaisance the past few years....once the older homes west of Sage were purchased, it created a new market and thus the expansion of land values along Sage...hence the newer development of the multi-family and high rises...the movement has not gone to the west to close the gap between Sage and Voss for many reasons, namely too many single family units which have high values still....the property located at the corner of S. Rice and Westpark has been cleared and made ready for development by the owners....the anticipated development as stated in the article is for some type of Transit Oriented Development otherwise known as TOD....that property could set a gold standard for any future development along the much anticipated never loved MetroRail....this property will be the confluence of two rail lines, the Uptown line going through the Galleria Area and the University line coming from Hillcroft transit center all the way over to just east of the University of Houston....the anticipated TOD will be a live, work, walk, ride development with shops, high density living as well as an intermodal station for commuters...keep in mind, this tract is also one of the largest tracts available inside/near the loop system...a great in-fill site for sure...can't wait to see what happens there...

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  • The title was changed to The Future Of Lower Galleria

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