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Bathroom Remodel


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The hubby and I are about to remodel our master bath, which has barely been updated since the place was built in 1968. The "updates" included painting over the original tiles in the bath/shower area, spraying some weird texture over the existing paisley wallpaper and then painting that texture blue, and improperly installing a low-end toilet. It's all really special.

Anyway, we've succeeded in peeling up the THREE layers of linoleum from the floor (another few "upgrades"?), chipping off all the tile from the bath/shower area and tearing out the rotted baseboard from around the main vanity. Here are my questions, since we've never done anything like this before and don't want future owners to angrily discuss our "upgrades" on some bulletin board:

1) We're thinking of this hex tile on the floor, with this beadboard on the walls to four feet, painted dove grey above it, and this subway tile in the shower/bath (but with black accent tiles, and not so crappily done). Is this too much white? Too period for our house?

2) The vanity is built in, quite solidly, and to replace it would be a huge chunk of change. Would it be awkward to keep it, reface the cultured marble top that is hidden underneath a layer of MORE TEXTURED PAINT and just put new hardware on it? FYI, that's not OUR vanity; but ours looks just like it, albeit in a much larger space.

Thoughts? Ideas? Opinions? Feel free to trash my design ideas, because I am most definitely NOT a designer and I just want this thing to look fresh and clean and well-put together when done, no matter what that takes.

Thanks! :D

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the style will look right out of the 30`s..but its America, you can do what you want and as long as you enjoy the style, then thats what matters. If you have a budget, then a new sink w/hardware, new counter, change the drawer pulls and repaint.

Edited by GREASER
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As long as you don't think the 30s style will not clash with the rest of the house, go with it. Frankly, only mod or ultra contemporary would really clash. Traditional would match it well.

Here's a website that I looked at when picking my subway and hex tiles.

http://www.subwaytile.com/index.shtml

I don't think the white and grey is too much, especially since that is exactly what I put in my bath. Consider replacing some of the white hex tiles with black or colored ones, either in a pattern or randomly across the floor. Also, a black or colored stripe outlining the room is cool. Here's an example of what I did.

PC290003.jpg

Oh, and I personally cannot stand the soap indents as shown in your bath photo, but that is a personal gripe, not intended to be a sweeping design statement. I have the white ceramic soap dish attached to the tile. Easier to install, as well.

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GREASER, we have the budget for a new sink and faucet hardware, which we'll be doing. I figured since they were so minor, they weren't worth mentioning. Just a plain white sink and polished chrome faucet -- nothing spectactular.

Musicman, the rest of the vanity seems to be in great shape. I'm wondering if the bath overflowed more than once or there was just a lot of excess moisture from showers, since the only water-ish damage seems to be to the little baseboard area. These people didn't take care of this place AT ALL, so I'm frankly happy there isn't more damage that we've uncovered. :)

RedScare, I don't like those, either. :) Just happened to be the first photo I came across that had the subway tile in the shower area. I'm definitely leaning towards a black stripe just like that, and I like the idea of black hex tiles scattered in. Is it harder to tile when you throw those in? Or about the same degree of difficulty?

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RedScare, I don't like those, either. :) Just happened to be the first photo I came across that had the subway tile in the shower area. I'm definitely leaning towards a black stripe just like that, and I like the idea of black hex tiles scattered in. Is it harder to tile when you throw those in? Or about the same degree of difficulty?

It is actually very simple. The hex tile comes with a weblike backing that holds the tiles in proper spacing. After you lay the tile, you simply pop out the tiles that you want replaced with black ones and put the black ones in their place.

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If you're going to do 1930s then you need to do 1930s ALL THE WAY. That means a white marble top on the vanity and new shaker style doors.

You do realize that since the house wasn't built in the 1930s that this is going to look outdated and just WRONG 10 years down the road, right?

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If you're going to do 1930s then you need to do 1930s ALL THE WAY. That means a white marble top on the vanity and new shaker style doors.

You do realize that since the house wasn't built in the 1930s that this is going to look outdated and just WRONG 10 years down the road, right?

Note to self: Call sister-in-law, the former architectural director for one of Houston's largest homebuilders, and tell her how wrong her bathroom looks.

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Note to self: Call sister-in-law, the former architectural director for one of Houston's largest homebuilders, and tell her how wrong her bathroom looks.

it doesnt matter what others think..its your house, but you cant fight the arch. style. I would determine what the style of the house is and just go with that...obviously you like the original style or you wouldnt have bought it. Stay with a simple design and it will never go out of style

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it doesnt matter what others think..its your house, but you cant fight the arch. style. I would determine what the style of the house is and just go with that...obviously you like the original style or you wouldnt have bought it. Stay with a simple design and it will never go out of style

I agree with you in theory, but what is the architectural style of a late 1960s townhome? Everything inside was/is builder's standard, lowest common denominator fixtures, etc. What we liked about the house was the layout -- it had good bones despite being a total mess (and I mean a TOTAL, reeking, festering mess) when we bought it -- the neighborhood, the schools, the close proximity to our offices, the accessibility to freeways and restaurants and entertainment and shopping, etc. We definitely did NOT buy it for the crappy, poorly-done bathrooms. ;)

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Note to self: Call sister-in-law, the former architectural director for one of Houston's largest homebuilders, and tell her how wrong her bathroom looks.

That would probably be a good idea seeing as how homebuilders typically don't produce anything even remotely approaching architectural excellence.

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Since I have a 1930's house, I love the style you are going for. I have installed those hex tiles before (actually bought some that already had the black tile inserts). I love the look, but they were a pain for me to install. Just don't overdo it on the mastic and you will be fine. As for the vanity, just reface and it and add a nice carrara marble tob and undermount sink. To me, that is classic, but also speaks of good quality. Don't go cultured marble or it will look like you ran out of money.

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I agree with you in theory, but what is the architectural style of a late 1960s townhome? Everything inside was/is builder's standard, lowest common denominator fixtures, etc.

For the permanent stuff (mainly the tile) choose nice materials that will work with a variety of styles. If you just have to have the style of the moment, then do it through the use of paint and accessories which are easily and inexpensively changed when they fall out of vogue.

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I agree with you in theory, but what is the architectural style of a late 1960s townhome?
it would be square tile of some sorts. no hex tile, no beadboard and no subway tile. too bad you can't pickup one of those infrared ceiling lamps. that has 60's all over it.
Musicman, the rest of the vanity seems to be in great shape. I'm wondering if the bath overflowed more than once or there was just a lot of excess moisture from showers, since the only water-ish damage seems to be to the little baseboard area. These people didn't take care of this place AT ALL, so I'm frankly happy there isn't more damage that we've uncovered. :)

i was thinking someone went mop happy in that house. for something to rot though...hard to believe unless there's constant water for a long period.

Edited by musicman
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I think most of you will be happy to hear that I've now seriously rethought the whole 1930s thing and will be taking a different path. To be honest, I was the big proponent of that look and my husband was NOT a fan. :) He feels very vindicated right now. :lol:

His idea is to do slate on the floors and in the shower, reface the vanity, paint (we both actually like dove grey walls...so that design element hasn't changed), install a nice basboard all the way around and do a new sink/faucet. What HE'S stumped on, however, is what to do with the countertop on the vanity. I suggested soapstone, but it would be too much with all the slate and is quite pricey. Thoughts?

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I think most of you will be happy to hear that I've now seriously rethought the whole 1930s thing and will be taking a different path. To be honest, I was the big proponent of that look and my husband was NOT a fan. :) He feels very vindicated right now. :lol:

His idea is to do slate on the floors and in the shower, reface the vanity, paint (we both actually like dove grey walls...so that design element hasn't changed), install a nice basboard all the way around and do a new sink/faucet. What HE'S stumped on, however, is what to do with the countertop on the vanity. I suggested soapstone, but it would be too much with all the slate and is quite pricey. Thoughts?

My two cents: You can't go wrong with natural stone, just don't get the slate they sell out of the box at Home Depot...that pattern has been way overused! A nice charcoal color with light gray grout would help ground the floor and would go nice with the dove gray walls. I think a polished countertop would be a nice contrast, perhaps quartz? A lighter color with gray and black speck would look good, IMO. Then paint the vanity and trim white (not stark white, but something with a gray tint) and finish off with a white undermount sink and whatever finish fixtures you prefer.

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His idea is to do slate on the floors and in the shower, reface the vanity, paint (we both actually like dove grey walls...so that design element hasn't changed), install a nice basboard all the way around and do a new sink/faucet. What HE'S stumped on, however, is what to do with the countertop on the vanity. I suggested soapstone, but it would be too much with all the slate and is quite pricey. Thoughts?

How about a nice white marble countertop with some veins of grey in it to help tie it in with the rest of the grey in the room?

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  • 4 months later...
I think most of you will be happy to hear that I've now seriously rethought the whole 1930s thing and will be taking a different path. To be honest, I was the big proponent of that look and my husband was NOT a fan. :) He feels very vindicated right now. :lol:

His idea is to do slate on the floors and in the shower, reface the vanity, paint (we both actually like dove grey walls...so that design element hasn't changed), install a nice basboard all the way around and do a new sink/faucet. What HE'S stumped on, however, is what to do with the countertop on the vanity. I suggested soapstone, but it would be too much with all the slate and is quite pricey. Thoughts?

Sheets, you can do a pseudo blend of both ideas, which is more the trend now. I just redid our master with light, polished granite tile on the floor, shower and 1/2 way up the bathroom walls. Yet I went with the 20's retro hardware in brushed nickel (warming towel bar included), light vanilla walls with black and white architectural prints framed in gold,marble white cabinets and trim, a claw foot tub (OMG am I in love with that tub!), and a chrystal Chandelier over the tub. It has a timeless feel. I hate to say it, because I put it in my kitchen last year, the rustic slate look is kinda on the way out. Sleek and classic is taking hold.

It's a small bathroom, but doing it really well may make up for the desire for these bathing caverns these days. We just didn't need the space to salsa in the bathroom, so we didn't expand it.

You actually can find some really great deals on granite tile these days. Just try to go for 16x16.

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Sheets, you can do a pseudo blend of both ideas, which is more the trend now. I just redid our master with light, polished granite tile on the floor, shower and 1/2 way up the bathroom walls. Yet I went with the 20's retro hardware in brushed nickel (warming towel bar included), light vanilla walls with black and white architectural prints framed in gold,marble white cabinets and trim, a claw foot tub (OMG am I in love with that tub!), and a chrystal Chandelier over the tub. It has a timeless feel. I hate to say it, because I put it in my kitchen last year, the rustic slate look is kinda on the way out. Sleek and classic is taking hold.

It's a small bathroom, but doing it really well may make up for the desire for these bathing caverns these days. We just didn't need the space to salsa in the bathroom, so we didn't expand it.

You actually can find some really great deals on granite tile these days. Just try to go for 16x16.

pics!

flipper

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  • 1 month later...
The hubby and I are about to remodel our master bath, which has barely been updated since the place was built in 1968. The "updates" included painting over the original tiles in the bath/shower area, spraying some weird texture over the existing paisley wallpaper and then painting that texture blue, and improperly installing a low-end toilet. It's all really special.

Anyway, we've succeeded in peeling up the THREE layers of linoleum from the floor (another few "upgrades"?), chipping off all the tile from the bath/shower area and tearing out the rotted baseboard from around the main vanity. Here are my questions, since we've never done anything like this before and don't want future owners to angrily discuss our "upgrades" on some bulletin board:

1) We're thinking of this hex tile on the floor, with this beadboard on the walls to four feet, painted dove grey above it, and this subway tile in the shower/bath (but with black accent tiles, and not so crappily done). Is this too much white? Too period for our house?

2) The vanity is built in, quite solidly, and to replace it would be a huge chunk of change. Would it be awkward to keep it, reface the cultured marble top that is hidden underneath a layer of MORE TEXTURED PAINT and just put new hardware on it? FYI, that's not OUR vanity; but ours looks just like it, albeit in a much larger space.

Thoughts? Ideas? Opinions? Feel free to trash my design ideas, because I am most definitely NOT a designer and I just want this thing to look fresh and clean and well-put together when done, no matter what that takes.

Thanks! :D

Based on my experiences in my cousins' flat (yes that's correct) near the Museum District, the multiple linoleum layers may very well be covering some asbestos, so watch out, unless you enjoy carcinogens.

Edited by IronTiger
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I think most of you will be happy to hear that I've now seriously rethought the whole 1930s thing and will be taking a different path. To be honest, I was the big proponent of that look and my husband was NOT a fan. :) He feels very vindicated right now. :lol:

His idea is to do slate on the floors and in the shower, reface the vanity, paint (we both actually like dove grey walls...so that design element hasn't changed), install a nice basboard all the way around and do a new sink/faucet. What HE'S stumped on, however, is what to do with the countertop on the vanity. I suggested soapstone, but it would be too much with all the slate and is quite pricey. Thoughts?

Yes on the slate, but NOT 12x12 ANYTHING on the shower walls. 12x12 tiles are meant to go on horizontal surfaces (i.e. floors, not walls). You can still do slate in the shower... just make sure you don't use "big" tiles.

Here is a simple look: rip out the vanity and sink. Replace with white ikea or lower-end kraftmaid knock-off from Lowes (nothing ornate - just a simple, clean door), for $150? or $250?, or something like that, you can get a drop-in granite countertop (black) - with sink, ready to go... do subway tile or 4x4 tile on the shower walls... and then anything but brass fixtures/cabinet hardware. Paint the walls gray or white (eggshell finish - nothing too high gloss). Your house was built in 1968; anything is better than what was there.

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