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36 minutes ago, samagon said:

I'm not sure this is a thing. google maps shows quite a few liquor stores scattered across 3rd ward, also there are a number of convenience stores, all of which will have beer/wine for sale.

Another item I unfortunately didn't have time to get to in on my project that was on my list!

Would be relatively easy to figure out which parcels you could sell alcohol on, but I couldn't easily get a list of churches/schools/etc that trigger the alcohol restrictions.

FWIW, Houston actually has a more stringent requirement than the state requires and they have loosened it in some areas. 

Also, CoH made some adjustments to development rules, related to flooding, to get the HEB project built. The federal funds were going to expire, so I'm glad they used them, but it did result in HEB closing their store on OST. Fortunately, I think the Aldi was already in development. 

The other thing I wish I could see research on is how successful online grocery order and delivery has been in food desert areas. Both Amazon and HEB take SNAP for curbside/delivery.

Would be interesting to look at the pros/cons of subsidizing grocery store construction when you might just subsidize the delivery fee. Hurts older/less tech savvy people, but nothing ever is 100% good.

 

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I think we also need to take note that these dramatic increases in property value isn't just in 3rd ward. Take a look at Garden Oaks and Oak Forrest. Small 1,200 Sq ft homes are being torn down and mansions are replacing them. Homes that would sell in those areas for 120K 10 years ago are now selling for 600K. The Heights was probably one of the biggest food desserts in Houston, filled with nothing but body shops and abandoned lots. We all know how drastic the entire heights has changed over the last decade. Homes that used to sell there for 200K for half an acre now sell at millions. This is inevitable in Houston; one of the fastest growing cities in the US. Nowhere is safe, especially not a neighborhood thats within the vicinity of Downtown/ Midtown/ Museum District/ Medical Center/ and even hobby airport. This has never been about targeting a certain race (Black/Hispanic/ etc). This is strictly supply/ demand and business. None of us are guaranteed the neighborhood we currently live in, if you want something "affordable"......well we literally live in Texas, there are endless affordable living options. Let's be a little grateful that we don't live in NYC, Chicago, Seattle. I mean even Atlanta and Fort Lauderdale are pricier than here. Property value will ALWAYS increase in a big and growing city, no one should be exempt from it just because of the color of their skin. 

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On 10/14/2021 at 8:10 AM, samagon said:

 

and the main crux, @tigereye hit above, these so called community leaders don't care about the area until there is a potential benefit for them personally

Fixed that last sentence. That's based on my experience when we lived in Midtown East of Main from 1998 to 2004.

On 10/14/2021 at 12:18 PM, wilcal said:

The spending is not even about social justice. Yes, parking garages should be greener, but what do you think is more effective? Spending 6.6 million on planting more trees in the area or sticking them to the side of a parking garage?

Remember this is tax revenue we are talking about! Three TIRZ is going to be subsidizing Rice's green choices instead of Rice paying for it themselves. Is any property tax even being paid on these lots? $6.4 million could have made an actual park instead of paying for Rice to develop their own private plazas.

Gentrification and displacement are two different things. If people choose to leave then that is mostly fine. If they are forced to leave their communities then I don't think that is right. 

Significant portions of the Third Ward were redlined, people weren't able to buy property, and there are low home ownership rates as a result. Because there are a decent number of renters, they can be displaced much easier. 

I'm not saying you're wrong as I think it is a valid POV, and honestly I felt the same way about the CBA before I dug into the reasoning and looked at how these communities have basically had the rug pulled out, and what I'm hearing from you and IAH77 is that communities should be happy to become more multi-racial because segregation is over, and again that doesn't sit right with me.

 

 

If you think the so called "community leaders" are trying to make things better for the community overall, you are going to be sad once everything plays out. This is strictly about personal power for those who are "leading" the effort.

The significant portions of the Third Ward that were redlined, were redlined to eliminate White property owners and sell the properties multiple times to Blacks. The area from say, TSU North was different, as it never had a majority White population.

On 10/14/2021 at 1:24 PM, BeerNut said:

I attended a few CBA coalition meetings...  They talk about potential harm The Ion will bring but praised all the "work" the MRA and Coleman have done for Third Ward.  Everyone was dismayed when Fiesta left but the store manager was alone at city hall begging the for help with high shrink and continuous police calls.  I thought the coalition would work with Rice on technology focused solutions but they want them to fix everything.

No, the coalition just wants personal power and money. They couldn't give a rat's backside about the community.

On 10/14/2021 at 1:32 PM, samagon said:

I say that because I see other things happening in the 3rd ward that are far more detrimental to the community, yet, I see very few stories about it, and fewer still from the community leaders.

it's a topic for another thread (and I believe it is a topic of its own thread), but midtown has been buying so much property in 3rd ward, and then just bulldozes the home and leaves the land vacant. all under the premise that some day they are going to build affordable housing. they have pockmarked the 3rd ward and done more damage to the community than the loss of Fiesta ever could. want to see what land is owned by midtown TIRZ?

in fact, a google search for news related to Houston Coalition for Equitable Development Without Displacement only brings back news related to ION, nothing else.

I will say that regarding the ION, I do hope that they engage with the community to create tech jobs for people in the local community, specifically youths, but the other stuff the HCEDD wants is pretty ridiculous when you look at this innovation district, and other players that have been taking action for more than a decade that have resulted in doing more harm to the community, well, yeah. Midtown TIRZ needs to be in their crosshairs, not Rice.

Blame Garnet Coleman for the land banking. We've discussed that before. He's a power hungry guy, and the land banking helps him.

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On 10/14/2021 at 10:35 AM, wilcal said:

Transit access to the new HEB is lower than the old Fiesta, although I do not have any visualizations to show that.

I agree.
For me, this is not some theoretical argument. I've taken METRO to the South Fwy H-E-B twice, and although it's not that far as the crow flies, it's one of those "you can't get there from here" spots that are one of Houston's distinguishing traits. 
The store is at the corner of a one-way street (N MacGregor Way) and a South Fwy service road. Actually, one can get there; it's getting out again that's tricky. 
Imagine being laden with groceries and having to cross a busy street, followed by a long walk on a bridge over either a freeway or a bayou, followed by crossing another busy street. For a while, METRO was offering a shuttle from the Eastwood Transit Center, but it didn't keep any regular schedule. 
Perhaps @iah77 has some insights that I've missed. If so, I'd enjoy hearing about their personal experiences.

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On 10/18/2021 at 2:33 AM, Tumbleweed_Tx said:

everybody has their hands out. wanting a piece of the pie. They want the pieces they didn't earn, nor did they help to bring that pie to bear.
Pardon my French, but, f*ck those types, they're all grifters.  

Hey, just because Rice is asking for tens of millions in tax money for beautification while not paying property taxes themselves doesn't make them grifters. 

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On 10/19/2021 at 10:19 AM, wilcal said:

Hey, just because Rice is asking for tens of millions in tax money for beautification while not paying property taxes themselves doesn't make them grifters. 

What makes you think they aren't paying property taxes? This isn't a part of the university - this is an asset run by the endowment. 

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4 hours ago, HNathoo said:

What makes you think they aren't paying property taxes? This isn't a part of the university - this is an asset run by the endowment. 

If Rice pays taxes on their endowment gains they need close their business school. That's the whole point of being a non-profit entity. 

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13 hours ago, HNathoo said:

What makes you think they aren't paying property taxes? This isn't a part of the university - this is an asset run by the endowment. 

I guess I assumed improperly that non-profit owned land, even if owned by an endowment, would not be paying property taxes like the university-specific sites. 

8 hours ago, phillip_white said:

If Rice pays taxes on their endowment gains they need close their business school. That's the whole point of being a non-profit entity. 

Well, there's a difference between paying taxes on the profits and paying property taxes, right? Evidently they may be paying property taxes. 

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9 minutes ago, wilcal said:

I guess I assumed improperly that non-profit owned land, even if owned by an endowment, would not be paying property taxes like the university-specific sites. 

Well, there's a difference between paying taxes on the profits and paying property taxes, right? Evidently they may be paying property taxes. 

Looks like Rice is actually delinquent on their taxes at 4201 Main St (the Ion).

5C6306A9-325E-4538-B8F1-EC9656E23725.png

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24 minutes ago, Amlaham said:

I mean......... the taxes were collected in this area by Midtown Tirz for almost the last 3 decades (since 1994). Why is no one having an issue with them but have an issue with Rice? Rice did WAY more upgrades to the area in the last year than Midtown Tirz has done in the last 30 years. Not to mention, Rice did all the upgrades before they even requested funding. This area was never really touched by Midtown Tirz except the street signs to include "Midtown." The Tirz mainly focused on the northern portion of midtown. I feel like theres a constant switch of narratives to paint Rice as the bad guy 😂, either its not paying taxes, not considering 3rd ward residents, creating a food desert. Would you guys prefer the abandoned sears and run down fiesta with all the homeless scattered around?

To be fair, there are still a lot of homeless scattered around. I have no idea how Stuff’d Wings plans on running a successful business out of the old Shipley Donuts when there’s a homeless encampment right outside their front door along the 59 off-ramp.

Edited by clutchcity94
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2 hours ago, clutchcity94 said:

Looks like Rice is actually delinquent on their taxes at 4201 Main St (the Ion).

5C6306A9-325E-4538-B8F1-EC9656E23725.png

 

That's weird.  I just pulled that same record and those "Prior year" amounts are not on there.  But it does confirm that they pay property taxes.

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3 hours ago, clutchcity94 said:

To be fair, there are still a lot of homeless scattered around. I have no idea how Stuff’d Wings plans on running a successful business out of the old Shipley Donuts when there’s a homeless encampment right outside their front door along the 59 off-ramp.

Its not thaaaaat bad now, and its much better than it was. Shipley's was doing good business, that thing was busy most of the time when you'd go in, and the homeless was much worse then. Its especially not that bad compared to other cities.

Also, lulz at them being behind on taxes, thats just a bit funny. I would like the fences to come down around Greentown labs and the parking lot next door. It feels a little standoff-ish with the neighborhood. Unless they are saying things aren't done yet, then I can understand. Otherwise, take the fences down! 

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9 minutes ago, X.R. said:

Its not thaaaaat bad now, and its much better than it was. Shipley's was doing good business, that thing was busy most of the time when you'd go in, and the homeless was much worse then. Its especially not that bad compared to other cities.

Also, lulz at them being behind on taxes, thats just a bit funny. I would like the fences to come down around Greentown labs and the parking lot next door. It feels a little standoff-ish with the neighborhood. Unless they are saying things aren't done yet, then I can understand. Otherwise, take the fences down! 

Every house around that block has fences or bars on their windows, why in the world does a fence on someones land offend people?

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8 minutes ago, iah77 said:

Every house around that block has fences or bars on their windows, why in the world does a fence on someones land offend people?

Wellllllll, it doesn't offend me. I just think its an odd look when you have Rice creating these beautiful spaces by the Ion, and later on taxpayer money will be going to beautification and public plazas/space that are right next to...large fences around parking lots that clearly are there to keep the security of the vehicles inside of it. It wouldn't instill a ton of confidence in anyone to actual utilize those spaces. 

Plus, they have security people around so I honestly don't understand the need. Edit: A solution: If you're gonna spend all that money to do make everything pretty, and you're in charge of making pretty public spaces, maybe just build a permanent wall with a gate? 

Edited by X.R.
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On 11/3/2021 at 4:29 PM, CREguy13 said:

Hoping this is simply quick politics to have gone on record for delaying vote... I recently started working out of the Ion and it is bustling with energy from VCs, startups, several large energy companies, highly programmed networking and academic events, tons of visitors, etc.  Also Greentown Labs is near or at capacity and there is spillover from there to here already taking place...  the moment these investments are approved, Phase I is likely ready to be announced.  

Could be wrong, but don't think I am... hopefully this is only a short pause.  Serious momentum underway.

That is really awesome to hear! I’m glad this development (and Greentown) are picking up steam.
 

It makes me so happy because my mom and I went to that Sears a lot- she loved that building and even though it was sketch city around there sometimes, it was a cool building with a neat history. I’d love to take my mom and show her sometime- maybe when Late August opens! 😁 And when I was a student at HCC Main many moons ago (lol), I frequented that Fiesta when I wanted a semi-healthy lunch with fruit/veg and not school vending machine trash-tier stuff. 

anyway, I love seeing that Sears building is getting a new lease on life, and I’m really glad it’s gaining momentum and getting visitors/tenants/etc.

I can’t wait to see the next phases of the project- I know there have been some renders, but does anyone know an approximate timeframe for some of the next buildouts? 

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6 hours ago, BEES?! said:

It makes me so happy because my mom and I went to that Sears a lot- she loved that building and even though it was sketch city around there sometimes, it was a cool building with a neat history.

You can still see the old Sears days on Apple Maps:

Screen Shot 2021-11-05 at 7.44.31 AM.png

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On 11/3/2021 at 3:21 PM, Brooklyn173 said:

Community Benefits Agreement on hold ...

Houston City Council delays vote on Ion investments amid opposition

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/houston/article/Houston-council-delays-vote-on-Ion-investments-16588655.php

 

 

I was reading through some of the comments from the local groups who are celebrating this, and there may be some value in having Rice reallocate some legal capital to either making a separate agreement with the local groups or giving them a larger say in the re-investment into the area that Rice promises to make. Based on the comments online and whats been published, alot of people are passionate about this and if they can get council members to pause like this then maybe its worth listening, dunno.

Buuuuuuut that is all contingent upon them getting their legal situation together. For example, Greentown Labs had quite a few medium to large law firms around town donate time to them in the startup phase here in Houston (reviewing and negotiating contracts, helping with intellectual properties, formation, ect). The local coalition basically needs to go and do the same, see if some decent sized firms in town, or nationally, wouldn't mind helping them out with negotiations and the contracting, tell them whats reasonable and whats not in their experience, etc. I cannot imagine laypersons, or a small outfit, doing this by themselves. That isn't smart, and it could cause more harm than good if they are passing up on reasonable opportunities that Rice offers for things that no real estate/govt attorney would consider possible. 

edit: For example, Jane from Baker Botts saying "All they want is x,y, and z and Rice should be able to accommodate this" is so much easier to gain traction on than whatever is happening now.

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52 minutes ago, X.R. said:

I was reading through some of the comments from the local groups who are celebrating this, and there may be some value in having Rice reallocate some legal capital to either making a separate agreement with the local groups or giving them a larger say in the re-investment into the area that Rice promises to make. Based on the comments online and whats been published, alot of people are passionate about this and if they can get council members to pause like this then maybe its worth listening, dunno.

Buuuuuuut that is all contingent upon them getting their legal situation together. For example, Greentown Labs had quite a few medium to large law firms around town donate time to them in the startup phase here in Houston (reviewing and negotiating contracts, helping with intellectual properties, formation, ect). The local coalition basically needs to go and do the same, see if some decent sized firms in town, or nationally, wouldn't mind helping them out with negotiations and the contracting, tell them whats reasonable and whats not in their experience, etc. I cannot imagine laypersons, or a small outfit, doing this by themselves. That isn't smart, and it could cause more harm than good if they are passing up on reasonable opportunities that Rice offers for things that no real estate/govt attorney would consider possible. 

edit: For example, Jane from Baker Botts saying "All they want is x,y, and z and Rice should be able to accommodate this" is so much easier to gain traction on than whatever is happening now.

As I recall, the HCEDD was offered an eye-popping 4 positions on that council that worked on the agreement and declined. I’d think serious counsel would’ve told them what a big offer that actually was.

I wrote to Councilwoman Shabazz-Evans today to express my support for the proposed agreement. 
 

Edit: @BeerNut posted a letter from Rice last November indicating Rice offered 4 of 15 spots on the CBA Working Group to the HCEDD. 

Edited by houstontexasjack
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On 11/5/2021 at 5:17 PM, houstontexasjack said:

As I recall, the HCEDD was offered an eye-popping 4 positions on that council that worked on the agreement and declined. I’d think serious counsel would’ve told them what a big offer that actually was.

I wrote to Councilwoman Shabazz-Evans today to express my support for the proposed agreement. 
 

Edit: @BeerNut posted a letter from Rice last November indicating Rice offered 4 of 15 spots on the CBA Working Group to the HCEDD. 

Exactly. HCEDD demanded a whopping 8 positions on the working group. That would have given them majority control. No way that was going to fly.

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Rice, city agree on $15M pact to invest in community around Ion, over organizers' opposition

 
Dylan McGuinnessStaff writer
Nov. 10, 2021Updated: Nov. 10, 2021 10:59 a.m.
 

Rice Management Co. will spend $15.3 million on affordable housing development, minority and women job training and capital investments, and other initiatives in the community surrounding its Ion development, as part of a deal the city approved Wednesday.

City Council voted 14-3 to ratify the deal. Councilmembers Carolyn Evans-Shabazz, a Third Ward native, Tiffany Thomas and Letitia Plummer voted against the deal.

Mayor Sylvester Turner said the deal reflected his intention that the Ion open its opportunities to the entire city.

“This will be a game changer on so many fronts,” Turner said. “It’s not perfect, but I’ve also learned that you don’t sacrifice the good for the perfect and wind up with nothing.”

The council’s approval came over the opposition of community organizerswho wanted to negotiate their own deal directly with Rice, which is customary in “community benefits agreements,” as the city and Rice have called this deal.

Those agreements are reached between developers and community stakeholders to try to offset risks of displacement and gentrification and ensure the surrounding neighborhood stands to gain from the development. Organizers have been calling for a community benefits agreement with Rice to protect Third Ward, a historically Black community a few blocks from the innovation hub on South Main Street, since its groundbreaking more than two years ago.

“I fully support the Ion, but I believe CBAs should be between the developer and the impacted community,” said Evans-Shabazz, whose District D includes Third Ward.

In this case, Rice Management Co. negotiated an agreement with the city, not a community coalition, to spend $15.3 million on a slate of community-minded initiatives. Many of the recommendations for those measures stemmed from a 13-person working group of community members and other economic stakeholders named by Rice.

The Houston Coalition for Equitable Development without Displacement, the primary group behind the effort to negotiate a deal directly with Rice, produced its own framework for a pact. That platform incorporates many plans in the mayor’s Complete Communities program, a neighborhood revitalization effort that includes Third Ward.

Those organizers repeatedly asked the city at least to change the name of the deal, or else reject it and instruct Rice to negotiate with the coalition. They also have asked for an impact study on how the development will affect Third Ward. Group members have emphasized they are not opposed to the Ion; they just want to ensure current neighborhood residents benefit from it.

“The shininess of the project cannot take away from what the communities need,” Plummer said. “People who have lived there have to be able to stay there if they want.”

Rice, which has a $6.3 billion endowment and has spent $100 million on the Ion, offered the community organizers four seats on its working group, but the coalition insisted that all eight of its members be included and the university drop the “community benefits agreement” moniker, since it was not being negotiated directly with the community. The work went on without them.

The deal approved Wednesday includes a $5 million investment fund for minorities and women in tech, $4.5 million for affordable housing developers, and $2 million in technology sector job training, among other initiatives.

Six councilmembers moved to delay a vote on the deal last week. Three of them — Tarsha Jackson, Ed Pollard and Martha Castex-Tatum — voted to approve it Wednesday.

Jackson worked on CBAs as an organizer before her election and previously said she would oppose this deal. She ultimately voted in favor of it, she said, because she wants to see the model replicated at developments in her District B.

“In the end, this agreement will benefit the community,” Jackson said.

Castex-Tatum, who chairs the council’s economic development committee, said the deal would be a model for future agreements.

“I can’t say no to this, because it may not be perfect, but it is really good,” Castex-Tatum.

This article will be updated.

dylan.mcguinness@chron.com

 

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/houston/article/Rice-city-agree-on-15M-pact-to-invest-in-16609456.php

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6 minutes ago, hindesky said:

Rice, city agree on $15M pact to invest in community around Ion, over organizers' opposition

 
Dylan McGuinnessStaff writer
Nov. 10, 2021Updated: Nov. 10, 2021 10:59 a.m.
 

Rice Management Co. will spend $15.3 million on affordable housing development, minority and women job training and capital investments, and other initiatives in the community surrounding its Ion development, as part of a deal the city approved Wednesday.

City Council voted 14-3 to ratify the deal. Councilmembers Carolyn Evans-Shabazz, a Third Ward native, Tiffany Thomas and Letitia Plummer voted against the deal.

Mayor Sylvester Turner said the deal reflected his intention that the Ion open its opportunities to the entire city.

“This will be a game changer on so many fronts,” Turner said. “It’s not perfect, but I’ve also learned that you don’t sacrifice the good for the perfect and wind up with nothing.”

The council’s approval came over the opposition of community organizerswho wanted to negotiate their own deal directly with Rice, which is customary in “community benefits agreements,” as the city and Rice have called this deal.

Those agreements are reached between developers and community stakeholders to try to offset risks of displacement and gentrification and ensure the surrounding neighborhood stands to gain from the development. Organizers have been calling for a community benefits agreement with Rice to protect Third Ward, a historically Black community a few blocks from the innovation hub on South Main Street, since its groundbreaking more than two years ago.

“I fully support the Ion, but I believe CBAs should be between the developer and the impacted community,” said Evans-Shabazz, whose District D includes Third Ward.

In this case, Rice Management Co. negotiated an agreement with the city, not a community coalition, to spend $15.3 million on a slate of community-minded initiatives. Many of the recommendations for those measures stemmed from a 13-person working group of community members and other economic stakeholders named by Rice.

The Houston Coalition for Equitable Development without Displacement, the primary group behind the effort to negotiate a deal directly with Rice, produced its own framework for a pact. That platform incorporates many plans in the mayor’s Complete Communities program, a neighborhood revitalization effort that includes Third Ward.

Those organizers repeatedly asked the city at least to change the name of the deal, or else reject it and instruct Rice to negotiate with the coalition. They also have asked for an impact study on how the development will affect Third Ward. Group members have emphasized they are not opposed to the Ion; they just want to ensure current neighborhood residents benefit from it.

“The shininess of the project cannot take away from what the communities need,” Plummer said. “People who have lived there have to be able to stay there if they want.”

Rice, which has a $6.3 billion endowment and has spent $100 million on the Ion, offered the community organizers four seats on its working group, but the coalition insisted that all eight of its members be included and the university drop the “community benefits agreement” moniker, since it was not being negotiated directly with the community. The work went on without them.

The deal approved Wednesday includes a $5 million investment fund for minorities and women in tech, $4.5 million for affordable housing developers, and $2 million in technology sector job training, among other initiatives.

Six councilmembers moved to delay a vote on the deal last week. Three of them — Tarsha Jackson, Ed Pollard and Martha Castex-Tatum — voted to approve it Wednesday.

Jackson worked on CBAs as an organizer before her election and previously said she would oppose this deal. She ultimately voted in favor of it, she said, because she wants to see the model replicated at developments in her District B.

“In the end, this agreement will benefit the community,” Jackson said.

Castex-Tatum, who chairs the council’s economic development committee, said the deal would be a model for future agreements.

“I can’t say no to this, because it may not be perfect, but it is really good,” Castex-Tatum.

This article will be updated.

dylan.mcguinness@chron.com

 

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/politics/houston/article/Rice-city-agree-on-15M-pact-to-invest-in-16609456.php

In today's news people hold gun to someone's head demanding cash, or they will shot gun. Person with gun pointed at head hands over money to person with gun. More at 11.

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23 minutes ago, Luminare said:

In today's news people hold gun to someone's head demanding cash, or they will shot gun. Person with gun pointed at head hands over money to person with gun. More at 11.

Thank god the exorsion was less than expected...  I would love to see what Evans-Shabazz has donated to the district after so much time in power.

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So I guess every large development is going to be challenged by neighborhood groups for money or special perks from now on. I'm sorry but I just don't understand how this has anything to do with Rice University and the third ward. Why does Rice owe anyone anything. They are improving a dead zone that had no one living in it and now they are being squeezed. 

I just don't get it.

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, iah77 said:

Thank god the exorsion was less than expected...  I would love to see what Evans-Shabazz has donated to the district after so much time in power.

Well it won't be much of a shocker that more than likely this money will just disappear afterwards and never be used for its intended purpose. Then again that's never the point with actions such as this.

14 minutes ago, bobruss said:

So I guess every large development is going to be challenged by neighborhood groups for money or special perks from now on. I'm sorry but I just don't understand how this has anything to do with Rice University and the third ward. Why does Rice owe anyone anything. They are improving a dead zone that had no one living in it and now they are being squeezed. 

I just don't get it.

 

 

 

Welcome to the world of Social Justice, where nothing makes sense, and your appeasement to it ultimately means nothing because nothing you do will ever satisfy.....except for all your money, reputation, and authority...maybe.

DhXqflv.png

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1 hour ago, Luminare said:

Well it won't be much of a shocker that more than likely this money will just disappear afterwards and never be used for its intended purpose. Then again that's never the point with actions such as this.

Welcome to the world of Social Justice, where nothing makes sense, and your appeasement to it ultimately means nothing because nothing you do will ever satisfy.....except for all your money, reputation, and authority...maybe.

DhXqflv.png

This is a dumb sentence and you know it's a dumb sentence

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  • The title was changed to Ion District In Midtown
On 11/10/2021 at 12:38 PM, Luminare said:

Well it won't be much of a shocker that more than likely this money will just disappear afterwards and never be used for its intended purpose. Then again that's never the point with actions such as this.

Welcome to the world of Social Justice, where nothing makes sense, and your appeasement to it ultimately means nothing because nothing you do will ever satisfy.....except for all your money, reputation, and authority...maybe.

DhXqflv.png

More like welcome to the modern world of politics where each side takes a hardline stance and refuses to negotiate and compromise. Started with Newt in the 90s and is really peaking now. It is either not far right enough or not progressive enough. Meanwhile, the majority on the bell curve in the middle get ignored or screwed.

I hope this full development happens but after Caydon made promises and backed out, I will wait for groundbreaking before I get my hopes up.

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Wait, based on those renderings, I'm guessing the old Fiesta is gonna get raised to the ground? Or something is at least going on top of it? If so, the minimalist improvements makes sense. Plus, the chicken place that took over shipley's old location doesn't look so out of place with its outdoor patio and stuff if Ion District will put up buildings behind it.

Transformational is thrown around alot, but this is at least something very, very unique. Something we haven't seen before in the H. The renderings also highlights that the city/metro need to do something with that empty lot by Wheeler. If they don't want to spend any money, just make it a food truck park or something, easy cash flow for the city, gives people opportunity for successful business. I dunno, but if more stuff is coming, that empty lot is going to look weird.

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10 minutes ago, X.R. said:

Wait, based on those renderings, I'm guessing the old Fiesta is gonna get raised to the ground? Or something is at least going on top of it? If so, the minimalist improvements makes sense. Plus, the chicken place that took over shipley's old location doesn't look so out of place with its outdoor patio and stuff if Ion District will put up buildings behind it.

Transformational is thrown around alot, but this is at least something very, very unique. Something we haven't seen before in the H. The renderings also highlights that the city/metro need to do something with that empty lot by Wheeler. If they don't want to spend any money, just make it a food truck park or something, easy cash flow for the city, gives people opportunity for successful business. I dunno, but if more stuff is coming, that empty lot is going to look weird.

I think the longer term plan is for the old Fiesta building to be razed, yes.  The lot to the southwest catty corner for the Ion is also listed for sale, although I have to think the price being asked is exorbitant or Rice would have scooped it up.

Edited by houstontexasjack
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Houston company hopes to turn pipelines' waste into electricity

When Mihir Desu thinks about the mazes of pipelines zig-zagging across Houston and its industrial complexes, he doesn’t think about what they’re transporting or where they’re going. He thinks of their wasted potential.

Thousands of megawatts of unharnessed electricity could be generated at their intersections, where pipeline operators must adjust the pressure of gases and liquids as they’re transported along vast networks. But by installing a few devices at just one of these junctures, companies could harness 1 to 15 megawatts — enough electricity to power 200 to 3,000 homes.

Earlier this month, Desu and his team at Pressure Corp. announced they would begin offering the ability to convert that waste into electricity.

The technology to convert this waste into energy is not new, Desu said, but the cost of installing the machines to make it work has dropped, in large part because the Biden Administration made them eligible for federal investment tax credits, which are similar to those offered for solar and wind projects.

“These projects have been studied before, but one core issue has been that the cost of their capital is too high for the opportunity,” Desu said. “But now you have a mechanism to reduce the capital costs of these projects.”

Pressure Corp, which is partially housed in the Greentown Labs’ climate-tech incubator in Midtown, is not in the business of manufacturing the turboexpanders, generators, heaters or other machines used to convert the pressure into electricity. Instead, its team sifts through a facility’s data to complete feasibility studies, write up risk analyses, and help purchase and install the tools companies would need to begin generating electricity.

All told, installing one of the generating systems could cost $10 million to $20 million. But with the tax incentives, Desu said, 26 percent of the project’s cost could be written off until Jan. 1, 2023. After that, the incentive would decrease to 22 percent until the program tentatively expires in January 2024.

“If companies want to take advantage of these incentives, we’re open for business,” he said. “We’re ready and waiting.”

shelby.webb@chron.com

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Houston-company-hopes-to-turn-pipelines-waste-16627863.php

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On 11/17/2021 at 10:47 AM, CREguy13 said:

If you're supportive of the Ion, you'll dislike and be semi-annoyed by the comments in this episode.  If you're anti-Ion and what's happening in this area, you'll like this episode.  My opinion, but figured I'd save some 18:07

I thought the observation that the lack of access to the Ion from the Wheeler Street Transit Center is a missed opportunity was spot-on. "Transit adjacent", indeed!
Why are public transit riders forced to walk around the building to gain entrance? I'm hazarding a guess - the architects either didn't think to factor that into their plans, or just plain don't care.

 

 

Edited by dbigtex56
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