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The train wreck is in the station. This one is very original, but in need of a FULL restoration. Following an estate sale there is junk left everywhere and it needs a good cleaning for starters.

Despite all that, there is a very interesting small mod that could be a real gem if someone restored it. At only $65,000 the price is right. It was a 1956 Parade of Homes house designed by a senior Architecture student at Rice University. The design was used for the parade after winning a competition at the University.

The Architect, Mel O'Brien, went on to get his Masters from Princeton and was awarded the William Ward Watkin traveling fellowship from Rice University in 1960. He opened his own firm in Memphis in 1963. His principle works there include Christian Brothers High School and Cypress Jr. High, among other things. He was also part of a league of Architects involved in some of Memphis' civic planning projects. (Spaceage found that info for me, the rest came from Stephen Fox). He was also President of the Memphis AIA Chapter in 1969.

Restored this could be a really great little mod house. I will reserve comments as to what I think of the pictures currently on HAR, so suffice to say I took a couple of my own. It definitely needs a lot of work, but for $65,000, what do you want?

The original design apparently called for the carport to be side loading, which it isn't, and it suffers from a poorly executed garage conversion of the carport, although that could be fixed.

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The entire main living area has vaulted beamed ceilings. In front is a main living/dining area with an exposed brick wall and a row of clerestory windows.

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A wood stained valance at the opposite end.

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There are original aqua accordion doors dividing off the den area, where the vaulted ceilings continue and a wall of glass overlooks a back patio space. The den has stained paneling.

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there is an hanging light fixture thing above the sink in the kitchen.

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I don't think the kitchen has been painted since 1956 and still sports the old yellow patterned formica and yellow appliances with aqua cabinetry. Sorry if this is sideways, I have rotated it on my saved pictures and on Photobucket, and I just can't get it to do right.

P7220023.jpg

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I can really see alot of potential in this house. Since I have never done a restoration of an old house, I have no idea what it would cost, but I can definitely say I don't have the budget for it right now. Just out of curiousity, how much would a restoration like this cost, not including the house? I realize it's a broad question depending on many factors, but what would a good ball park figure be?

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I've never even seen cabinetry like that! It looks like the perforated wood my father has in his garage workshop, which he uses to hang tools from. :huh: That said, I still love it, especially with the yellow formica. I realize that we're a dying breed, though. I just hope that future generations appreciate this stuff as much as we do, what little of it may be left in the future, that is...

The ad copy about the kitchen is hilarious, too: "...the kitchen, in a U-shape, which permits the housewife to do all her chores just by turning around, and cuts down on the number of steps she would have to take daily." That was very thoughtful of them :lol:

I hope someone rescues this beauty, but given its location and the amount of TLC that it needs (not to mention the crappy job done on HAR of promoting it to any interested parties) I'm sadly doubtful that any justice will be done to it. Someone please prove me wrong!

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The house I grew up in in Overbrook (77087) had perforated wood cabinets with sliding doors, just like those, only there wasn't a bank of cabinets like you see on the right there. Our old house was built in '54 I think. My mother hated those cabinets--they'd always get hung up on the tracks.

Maybe it's just the poor presentation on HAR, but I don't think it looks like it's worth sinking 65K into. I guess it could work out as a quick flip, but it'd take some serious money to do it as a restore and that would take someone wanting to do it to live in it. I don't think the nabe is attractive enough for that.

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If i had the cash I'd buy it in a heartbeat - there's one thing that creeps me out, though - all those air fresheners:

9ib5hz.jpg

Holy crap. :blink: Good point. Wonder what odor they're masking...

Anyone want to check to see if someone died here? :ph34r:;)

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The location of the house really isn't bad. It's on Cayton Street which is loaded with small mods that haven't been modified with exception of 1 or 2. Cayton is in the process of undergoing consideration for Historic Neighborhood Designation. Hopefully by getting that designation it will create some pride inthe homeowners to take better care of their yards and building exteriors.

I've been in this little house several times over the last couple of weeks. It has tons of potential. Nothing..Nothing has been modified. As RPS stated, the garage is unfortunate. I think they built it that way because the lot is in an unusual position. It's placed between the back of 2 homes, so it is essentially in 2 backyards, but still faces the street. Across the street 2 of the best mods on the Parade of Homes were demolished to build a high school track. Therefore, the front faces the track, but there are no windows in the front so that might not matter. All of the windows face a courtyard (behind the garage which I assume the original owners used as additional auto space since it's cement. The windows facing the courtyard are practically ceiling to floor. To take out the cement in courtyard and landscape that area would be a 100% improvement and would really be the centerpiece of the living area.

I think the unfortunate placement of lot could be mitigated with some cool Mod looking fencing and landscaping.

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The location of the house really isn't bad. It's on Cayton Street which is loaded with small mods that haven't been modified with exception of 1 or 2. Cayton is in the process of undergoing consideration for Historic Neighborhood Designation. Hopefully by getting that designation it will create some pride inthe homeowners to take better care of their yards and building exteriors.

I've been in this little house several times over the last couple of weeks. It has tons of potential. Nothing..Nothing has been modified. As RPS stated, the garage is unfortunate. I think they built it that way because the lot is in an unusual position. It's placed between the back of 2 homes, so it is essentially in 2 backyards, but still faces the street. Across the street 2 of the best mods on the Parade of Homes were demolished to build a high school track. Therefore, the front faces the track, but there are no windows in the front so that might not matter. All of the windows face a courtyard (behind the garage which I assume the original owners used as additional auto space since it's cement. The windows facing the courtyard are practically ceiling to floor. To take out the cement in courtyard and landscape that area would be a 100% improvement and would really be the centerpiece of the living area.

I think the unfortunate placement of lot could be mitigated with some cool Mod looking fencing and landscaping.

That's great to hear about the potential for "Historic Designation" for Cayton St. That 'hood really needs it. Talking about the landscaping, you'd be surprised what a good landscaping design can do to a house & yard. (I just had work done, in my own backyard). My old Sunset Landscaping Book (revised ed. 1968) has interesting ideas for odd shaped lots. And the books usually feature mod-style homes.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The word on the street in Glenbrook is that this little gem will have a happy ending. A young couple that are into mod design apparently have a contract on it. Let's hope they get it ! I'd love to see this house done up !

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This kind of rare find is like a paleontologist finding a dinosaur body with all the flesh still on it! Someone must have been an unbelievably good housekeeper to have kept all that so original. Restoration from what I could see of the photos and just walking by should not really be that big a chore. A good cleaning - done as a preservationist rather than an anal wire brush and scouring powder type - to the woodwork and that kitchen would really minimize any refinishing needs. The fundamental elements of this house are so solid - it's almost a gift. I'd love to see the inside and do some detailed photography before any renovation begins.

If I wasn't in the middle of a preservation project on mine, I would buy this in a heartbeat. If the people who buy it ever read this, I would readily volunteer my services in consulting with you to develop a restoration plan, pro bono. There is a certain good feeling to this one, just imagine the years of love that kind of long term care represents.

Keep in mind that an essential core population of this neighborhood did realize their American dream. They married their sweethearts, raised the kids, nurtured the grandkids, paid off mortgages, retired, and worked their way through all the travails of life together. A majority of these were happy homes because the architecture was fresh, imaginative, and stimulated the possible. The elements are all there to continue to do that.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I'm with the "just clean it up" crowd. A purist's dream....a livable time machine. I really love this house! :)

Sorry to say the contract with the couple that was going to fix this up right fell thru. It's back on the market. Someone please save this little gem !

If I wasn't already up to my ears in mod I would.

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Why not?

It's obvious to a historian from glances at the present photos that a great deal of love and care has gone into keeping this little house over the years. As original as the interior appears to be and although the owner aged and could not maintain it recently - it's still a gem. Why doesn't the home owner's association in Glenbrook buy this to preserve it? They can use it as their office as well as a repository for the neighborhood house plans, archives, and a meeting place. Restored it will serve as a neighborhood symbol and used by realtorsx and politicos to show where the neighborhood came from and what it could be. Scouts and garden clubs could gather there and volunteers maintain it. Workshops for new owners interested in preservation skill learning and basic "how to take care of your home" training. Maybe the newly organizing Hobby Area Chambers and Improvement people could use it as an office (tucked in a bedroom)?

It's across the street from a school and the expenses are very affordable for any of these applications. Grants could be pursued to reimburse acquisition, restoration, and establish it as a historic building. The HOA could also simply acquire it, restore it to neighborhood standards, and sell it to recover their cost and have something they all want to live beside as well.

I also speak from experience of a sort. While on the Board of Directors of our HOA, we bought a unit and did just this. Keep in mind that HOA money is not "spent" but simply parked in an asset. If your neighbors want to restore Glenbrook to prominence and protect all their existing investments - get directly involved and do it. They are all runnming the risk of having this snapped up and badly done or torn down to build whatever. In all these risks, what you have with all it's tarbnished, but polishable charm - will be irrevocably lost.

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Here's an even crazier but good idea. RDA/Cite should buy this house and have Rice Students restore it and publish the results in Cite. Now there's a full circle moment for you. RDA is very much into the small, efficient, green house and something tells me they could afford it and write off any losses that doing this kind of thing might present.

Maybe Houston Mod will someday be able to do something like that, but not yet.

Edited by Willowisp
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Why not?

It's obvious to a historian from glances at the present photos that a great deal of love and care has gone into keeping this little house over the years. As original as the interior appears to be and although the owner aged and could not maintain it recently - it's still a gem. Why doesn't the home owner's association in Glenbrook buy this to preserve it? They can use it as their office as well as a repository for the neighborhood house plans, archives, and a meeting place. Restored it will serve as a neighborhood symbol and used by realtorsx and politicos to show where the neighborhood came from and what it could be. Scouts and garden clubs could gather there and volunteers maintain it. Workshops for new owners interested in preservation skill learning and basic "how to take care of your home" training. Maybe the newly organizing Hobby Area Chambers and Improvement people could use it as an office (tucked in a bedroom)?

It's across the street from a school and the expenses are very affordable for any of these applications. Grants could be pursued to reimburse acquisition, restoration, and establish it as a historic building. The HOA could also simply acquire it, restore it to neighborhood standards, and sell it to recover their cost and have something they all want to live beside as well.

I also speak from experience of a sort. While on the Board of Directors of our HOA, we bought a unit and did just this. Keep in mind that HOA money is not "spent" but simply parked in an asset. If your neighbors want to restore Glenbrook to prominence and protect all their existing investments - get directly involved and do it. They are all runnming the risk of having this snapped up and badly done or torn down to build whatever. In all these risks, what you have with all it's tarbnished, but polishable charm - will be irrevocably lost.

Great idea and it would be wonderful. But Glenbrook doesn't have an HOA, only a civic club. The and whopping $25 annual dues are voluntary. There just aren't the funds for the civic club to take this on. But I hear there are a few folks interested in this great house who will do right by it. Hopefully one of those will work out soon.

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  • 1 month later...

hi all.

my SO and i will hopefully close on this property at the end of Oct/beginning of Nov. both of us have a love and a healthy respect for MCM and have already hopefully taken some steps towards seeing it restored/remodeled. we're both first home owners so this is a new and really exciting opportunity for us.

i've already scheduled a meeting with the houston historical commission for landmark status and hopefully that will go through. i would really like to thank user rps324 and his help with everything. if it wasn't for his patience and repeated showings of the house, we would have never gotten into it.

thanks.

aj & j.

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hi all.

my SO and i will hopefully close on this property at the end of Oct/beginning of Nov. both of us have a love and a healthy respect for MCM and have already hopefully taken some steps towards seeing it restored/remodeled. we're both first home owners so this is a new and really exciting opportunity for us.

i've already scheduled a meeting with the houston historical commission for landmark status and hopefully that will go through. i would really like to thank user rps324 and his help with everything. if it wasn't for his patience and repeated showings of the house, we would have never gotten into it.

thanks.

aj & j.

Good Luck, good to see so many people appreciating a neighborhood I grew up idolizing! The 'hood really does have some awesome homes. I have a feeling it's on it's way up. Sounds like rps is working hard these days.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello Folks! What I did today was clean the masterbath and master bedroom. Swept and mopped the floors. Also the living room carpet is gone. Lookin'

good and these photos are from my blackberry. I should bring my digital camera so you guys can enjoy the photos a little more. I also have flickr and

please go there for the photos and after as of today. :)

Link

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmtworld/

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Hello Folks! What I did today was clean the masterbath and master bedroom. Swept and mopped the floors. Also the living room carpet is gone. Lookin'

good and these photos are from my blackberry. I should bring my digital camera so you guys can enjoy the photos a little more. I also have flickr and

please go there for the photos and after as of today. :)

Link

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmtworld/

Wow yall got alot done this weekend! Looking good.

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Thanks for the pictures! Keep them coming. You will want all the pictures you can get when you go for the Good Brick Award, and you definitely should.

Jason

Plus, you'll want to hire me to shoot a bunch of new pictures for the presentation! :D

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I was allowed to go by and look over this jewel yesterday afternoon. The guys were great and seem to be off on an interesting adventure to make this their home. This is an absolutely amazing time capsule. It appears that an original owner lived her entire adult life here as a single mom raising a troubled child. The interior elements are all still in place right down to the Talk-A-Radio intercom/house radio system, electric stove top, and accordion doors. The entry is terrazzo tile. Great design and a serious human interest back story - what else could one want!

These guys do have a pretty steep hill to climb getting it back in shape, but they seem to be embracing this challenge. I know from long experience that heavy restoration and remodeling efforts are fraught with many things that jump up and surprise everyone. These surprises make budgeting and schedule practically impossible to maintain as tight a control on as all expect. These efforts also put severe strain on the best relationships and friendships along the way. I've even had clients divorce and several seperate, and almost all quarrel during these projects! It's like the old story of remembering it's hard to drain the swamp when you're up to your wallet in alligators.

In talking with the guys, they seem to value planning and have a pretty good one going. With almost 25 years of project management experience, I know how to appreciate a good plan. When one first looks at a project like this it's very easy to be overwhelmed. Where to start?, What to do? The pressure of needing to "do" something right away is a very real one. They seemed to take a step back and start seeing what they had and prioritizing - a very good thing. And effectively drawing upon the collective experiences of groups like this are a tremendous help.

I'm kinda excited to see how this one progresses.

post-6473-1226333101.jpg

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Good Morning,

Where can I find the actual blue print of the house?

We just took down the wall in the living room. I'll send a photo.

jt

I was allowed to go by and look over this jewel yesterday afternoon. The guys were great and seem to be off on an interesting adventure to make this their home. This is an absolutely amazing time capsule. It appears that an original owner lived her entire adult life here as a single mom raising a troubled child. The interior elements are all still in place right down to the Talk-A-Radio intercom/house radio system, electric stove top, and accordion doors. The entry is terrazzo tile. Great design and a serious human interest back story - what else could one want!

These guys do have a pretty steep hill to climb getting it back in shape, but they seem to be embracing this challenge. I know from long experience that heavy restoration and remodeling efforts are fraught with many things that jump up and surprise everyone. These surprises make budgeting and schedule practically impossible to maintain as tight a control on as all expect. These efforts also put severe strain on the best relationships and friendships along the way. I've even had clients divorce and several seperate, and almost all quarrel during these projects! It's like the old story of remembering it's hard to drain the swamp when you're up to your wallet in alligators.

In talking with the guys, they seem to value planning and have a pretty good one going. With almost 25 years of project management experience, I know how to appreciate a good plan. When one first looks at a project like this it's very easy to be overwhelmed. Where to start?, What to do? The pressure of needing to "do" something right away is a very real one. They seemed to take a step back and start seeing what they had and prioritizing - a very good thing. And effectively drawing upon the collective experiences of groups like this are a tremendous help.

I'm kinda excited to see how this one progresses.

Here is another photo of the wall.

Edited by jmt
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  • 3 weeks later...

These photos were taken last Saturday and cleaning up the outside. Finally it is looking a lot better but I need some folks to volunteer to do the yard at least once for the backyard and we don't have lawn equipment to do it and I am sure our dear friends would love to do it for at least once and we'll have a outing soon in helping us do the yard.

The yard needs to be mowed, weed eat, edged, and it will help keep mice and bugs away from the house because the grass will be shorter and nicer. Then we can do more things to it.

Please anyone? I know some of our new friends do have lawn equipment and the backyard is something i am worried about. Because grass is so tall and not sure if any lawn mower will just cut it. Will probably need a commercial lawn mower. Anyone have it? or just try and see if a regular mower will work.

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These photos were taken last Saturday and cleaning up the outside. Finally it is looking a lot better but I need some folks to volunteer to do the yard at least once for the backyard and we don't have lawn equipment to do it and I am sure our dear friends would love to do it for at least once and we'll have a outing soon in helping us do the yard.

The yard needs to be mowed, weed eat, edged, and it will help keep mice and bugs away from the house because the grass will be shorter and nicer. Then we can do more things to it.

Please anyone? I know some of our new friends do have lawn equipment and the backyard is something i am worried about. Because grass is so tall and not sure if any lawn mower will just cut it. Will probably need a commercial lawn mower. Anyone have it? or just try and see if a regular mower will work.

JMT:

A group of your Glenbrook Valley neighbors will help out on Saturday. I'll get with you later in the week to let you know what time we'll be over with lawn equipment.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello there again =)

Happy Holidays!

Where can you get a repilca "talk a radio" the photo you took from the wall. I tried typing every word to come up with "talk a radio" or "wall mount radio" or anything like that but doesn't come up.

Can you give a hint or help out?

Merry Christmas =)

Jason T.

I was allowed to go by and look over this jewel yesterday afternoon. The guys were great and seem to be off on an interesting adventure to make this their home. This is an absolutely amazing time capsule. It appears that an original owner lived her entire adult life here as a single mom raising a troubled child. The interior elements are all still in place right down to the Talk-A-Radio intercom/house radio system, electric stove top, and accordion doors. The entry is terrazzo tile. Great design and a serious human interest back story - what else could one want!

These guys do have a pretty steep hill to climb getting it back in shape, but they seem to be embracing this challenge. I know from long experience that heavy restoration and remodeling efforts are fraught with many things that jump up and surprise everyone. These surprises make budgeting and schedule practically impossible to maintain as tight a control on as all expect. These efforts also put severe strain on the best relationships and friendships along the way. I've even had clients divorce and several seperate, and almost all quarrel during these projects! It's like the old story of remembering it's hard to drain the swamp when you're up to your wallet in alligators.

In talking with the guys, they seem to value planning and have a pretty good one going. With almost 25 years of project management experience, I know how to appreciate a good plan. When one first looks at a project like this it's very easy to be overwhelmed. Where to start?, What to do? The pressure of needing to "do" something right away is a very real one. They seemed to take a step back and start seeing what they had and prioritizing - a very good thing. And effectively drawing upon the collective experiences of groups like this are a tremendous help.

I'm kinda excited to see how this one progresses.

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The "Talk-A-Radio" was actually a company in Dallas during that time that is long gone. It only had AM radio since FM was just arriving (like digital TV is now). Nutune dominated that market in the recent past, but is not a current choice. The model home that my grandparents bought on Glenview also had this system. There are currently many current technologies that emulate this concept from multi-room, multi-zone a/v systems to even phone systems with paging and music.

Restoration services may be available through the antique radio clubs here in Houston who all do this kind of thing as a hobby and might know a professional "tinkerer". The problems with this system will probably not be failed components, but dirty/work switches, volume controls, and tuners. Speakers throughout the last half of the past century were usually shot after ten years as the surround (that rubber part around the cones) would have deteriorated due to catalytic chemical action of their composition.

In 30 years of consumer electronics experience I've found another major problem with older electronics that lead to corrosion and circuit board failure - roaches. Roaches are everywhere and even in the cleanest of homes. They love the warmth of the electronics and their leavings bridge circuit foils and expedite aging of IC sockets and connectors. Special electronics cleaning often remediates the problem with some skilled topuches with technical temperature controlled soldering irons.

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Anyone reading this who actually has one like this from the 50s or early 60s that is working and you use it?

Please share pictures!

I think ideally, it would just be cool to have the look of these in your house, but not actually use it.

We have in-wall electric heaters in our bathrooms that we kept, but I never turned them on. We were told they'd work, but we just left them unhooked. It rarely gets that cold here.

Jason

The "Talk-A-Radio" was actually a company in Dallas during that time that is long gone. It only had AM radio since FM was just arriving (like digital TV is now). Nutune dominated that market in the recent past, but is not a current choice. The model home that my grandparents bought on Glenview also had this system. There are currently many current technologies that emulate this concept from multi-room, multi-zone a/v systems to even phone systems with paging and music.

Restoration services may be available through the antique radio clubs here in Houston who all do this kind of thing as a hobby and might know a professional "tinkerer". The problems with this system will probably not be failed components, but dirty/work switches, volume controls, and tuners. Speakers throughout the last half of the past century were usually shot after ten years as the surround (that rubber part around the cones) would have deteriorated due to catalytic chemical action of their composition.

In 30 years of consumer electronics experience I've found another major problem with older electronics that lead to corrosion and circuit board failure - roaches. Roaches are everywhere and even in the cleanest of homes. They love the warmth of the electronics and their leavings bridge circuit foils and expedite aging of IC sockets and connectors. Special electronics cleaning often remediates the problem with some skilled topuches with technical temperature controlled soldering irons.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello jmt, Happy New Year.

How is your project house doing?

This is a great thread because of your photos, thank you for sharing.

Hope Atomic Ranch magazine comes calling once it's complete.

You are some very strong brave people, Im very impressed.

Cheers! -Rock.

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Aww thanks. Right now we're taking it slowly and things we need to do. Guess the word is "budget and planning" at the moment. We've done some stuff there but not much else we can do until we discuss it with the General Contractor. That's all we're doing. Nothing much left at the moment for us to do. And yes there are plenty of little things to do in the house but limited with sun light and all.

Hello jmt, Happy New Year.

How is your project house doing?

This is a great thread because of your photos, thank you for sharing.

Hope Atomic Ranch magazine comes calling once it's complete.

You are some very strong brave people, Im very impressed.

Cheers! -Rock.

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  • 4 months later...

The Cayton house is under going 2 bid estimates and we will get started the remodel project sometime the 1st or 2nd week of June. Some of you guys will be in awe or some of you guys may not be so impressed. We love the originality of our house. There will be some good old charm left once we have it all finished. However, due to the costs and value in the area and all the other factors, we are limited on what we can do on renovations.

We will have the entire inside have new insulation and we did a lot of tear down and a lot of the ceiling and wall insulation is so gross and I am glad that we're taking the entire sheetrock in the entire house down. First of all the sheetrock is half century old, has old paint which probably has lead in it and also not to forget folks, this house had extensive termite damages and it ate through wood, paint, sheetrock, inside frame of the house etc. So it's good to tear down and we can see teh actual health of the wood frame. The masterbath is gone and will be repiped. The only thing that will have the actual original is the pink bathroom. We will keep it. Oh not to forget, the floors will stay and will be redone.

The kitchen however is a huge mess. The subfloor is damaged from previous water leaks and it will be easier to rip out the old kitchen and again, due to the cost of customizing everything and bring it back to orginal will be costly. SO we're going to "modern" it up and have a new face lift in the kitchen.

Oh speaking about the cork floor, love the idea but decided to extend the wood floor from the living room and will intall new wood planks just like the one in the living room and it will be all the way to the end where the multi-purpose room begins.

The master bathroom door from the kitchen to the master bedroom will be sealed off. I don't understand why it was designed that way but we're in the modern world here and some of this have to be redesigned and make it look real good and it should increase value after all this is done.

After this whole thing is done, we'll do the outside such as fence. We would like to put up a basket weave fence just like when it was first built in 1954.

And another thing is rewire the whole house with new wires up to CODE by the city and state. Also new insulation which this house needs bad. Also we should have the roof checked.

I will try to film it and take lots of photos when the house is under going mulitple projects at once.

Oh and the carport is so old and will be costly if we try to have it repaired piece by piece. So we're going to have it torn down and build a new wood carport and similar to the one we have now but more stronger and of course newer. Also we plan to put in a glass garage door and make it look "modern" on the outside. Spice up the look and also we will have more lighting on the outside and it's good to have a "show and tell" and not only that but for security reasons. Keep the area secured and lit up and hopefully Glenbrook will come up with the "yard of the month" by the council and should start doing that or "house" of the month. Come up with ideas to motivate these glenbrook valley folks.

I think this is all for now. Folks, go on over there and peak through the windows and see if you see anything different. We will have guys coming over doing some estimates this week and next. Then we'll pick our bidder and get started. Then we'll probably be over there quite often to make sure everything is good and all.

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oh don't forget to mention that three lawn services have fallen through in two weeks.

i swear, nobody wants to cut the thicket that is the lawn!

Get the number to Jamie's yard guy. He's reliable and very thorough. He's who we would use if Rob didn't take care of ours.

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Thanks jmt for your May 20th update.

As much as we would like to see this house remain original, you hit it right on the head when describing the electrical

and paint situation.

Cool MCM designs yes, mid-century technologies and building materials not so much.

Just think of the electrical load of our modern day world would put on a electrical system designed

only to have to contend with grandma's hamilton-beach blender.

Continued good luck and be safe.

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  • 2 months later...

Holy crap. blink.gif Good point. Wonder what odor they're masking...

Anyone want to check to see if someone died here? ph34r.gifwink.gif

Well, from what I learned from neighbors is that Mrs. Bunch the previous owner and the only owner until we bought it and started the project. She had lots and lots of cats living inside the house and I bet that's the reason of those air frenshers.

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The Cayton house is under going 2 bid estimates and we will get started the remodel project sometime the 1st or 2nd week of June. Some of you guys will be in awe or some of you guys may not be so impressed. We love the originality of our house. There will be some good old charm left once we have it all finished. However, due to the costs and value in the area and all the other factors, we are limited on what we can do on renovations.

We will have the entire inside have new insulation and we did a lot of tear down and a lot of the ceiling and wall insulation is so gross and I am glad that we're taking the entire sheetrock in the entire house down. First of all the sheetrock is half century old, has old paint which probably has lead in it and also not to forget folks, this house had extensive termite damages and it ate through wood, paint, sheetrock, inside frame of the house etc. So it's good to tear down and we can see teh actual health of the wood frame. The masterbath is gone and will be repiped. The only thing that will have the actual original is the pink bathroom. We will keep it. Oh not to forget, the floors will stay and will be redone.

The kitchen however is a huge mess. The subfloor is damaged from previous water leaks and it will be easier to rip out the old kitchen and again, due to the cost of customizing everything and bring it back to orginal will be costly. SO we're going to "modern" it up and have a new face lift in the kitchen.

Oh speaking about the cork floor, love the idea but decided to extend the wood floor from the living room and will intall new wood planks just like the one in the living room and it will be all the way to the end where the multi-purpose room begins.

The master bathroom door from the kitchen to the master bedroom will be sealed off. I don't understand why it was designed that way but we're in the modern world here and some of this have to be redesigned and make it look real good and it should increase value after all this is done.

After this whole thing is done, we'll do the outside such as fence. We would like to put up a basket weave fence just like when it was first built in 1954.

And another thing is rewire the whole house with new wires up to CODE by the city and state. Also new insulation which this house needs bad. Also we should have the roof checked.

I will try to film it and take lots of photos when the house is under going mulitple projects at once.

Oh and the carport is so old and will be costly if we try to have it repaired piece by piece. So we're going to have it torn down and build a new wood carport and similar to the one we have now but more stronger and of course newer. Also we plan to put in a glass garage door and make it look "modern" on the outside. Spice up the look and also we will have more lighting on the outside and it's good to have a "show and tell" and not only that but for security reasons. Keep the area secured and lit up and hopefully Glenbrook will come up with the "yard of the month" by the council and should start doing that or "house" of the month. Come up with ideas to motivate these glenbrook valley folks.

I think this is all for now. Folks, go on over there and peak through the windows and see if you see anything different. We will have guys coming over doing some estimates this week and next. Then we'll pick our bidder and get started. Then we'll probably be over there quite often to make sure everything is good and all.

Well Folks, its been a long while since I been on this forum. We did start the demo on June 2, 2009. Today is August 9, 2009 (close enough) and the house is almost finished bu a lot of detailing and little things that takes up a lot of time. There are photos you can see on flickr and the link is http://www.flickr.com/photos/jmtworld and you can start with Week One or go to teh bottom and start from there.

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