Jump to content
HAIF - Houston's original social media

Hopeful signs at 215 Westmoreland!


Recommended Posts

I was driving my daughter around today because she wanted to take some photos of Houston.

We went by what I think is one of the more notable old homes in the montrose/neartown area

and this is what we found:

215rwestmoreland.jpg

Don't know to what extent the home is being repaired or restored, but there is a big painting

job going on.

Edited by fortbendtomontrose
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Thought there would be more interest.

Maybe this thread should be merged with this one?

Hey there! Thanks for remembering my original thread. Yes, I've seen the activity and I'm absolutely thrilled. I'd love to know if the owners are doing the renovation or if it's being handled by some kind of historical preservation society. Either way, I cannot believe it's finally happening. I would pay those people to walk through that house. It's like a moment stood still in Houston 1905 and is forever captured. Look at those original horse ties at the front on the street.

I think I saw one of the owners speaking with a painter on the sidewalk but I didn't have the nerve to ask if I could see the house. I'm sure they'd say 'no' from what I've heard. And my husband's convinced that someone would chase me around with a chainsaw if I got in.......... :unsure:

Actually, I'd almost be willing to take that chance! Anyone got any inside scoop on the Westmoreland renovation?????

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey there! Thanks for remembering my original thread. Yes, I've seen the activity and I'm absolutely thrilled. I'd love to know if the owners are doing the renovation or if it's being handled by some kind of historical preservation society. Either way, I cannot believe it's finally happening. I would pay those people to walk through that house. It's like a moment stood still in Houston 1905 and is forever captured. Look at those original horse ties at the front on the street.

I think I saw one of the owners speaking with a painter on the sidewalk but I didn't have the nerve to ask if I could see the house. I'm sure they'd say 'no' from what I've heard. And my husband's convinced that someone would chase me around with a chainsaw if I got in.......... :unsure:

Actually, I'd almost be willing to take that chance! Anyone got any inside scoop on the Westmoreland renovation?????

Don't hestitate to ask...tell them you're from HAIF.

The worst thing is you'll get a "no".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey there! Thanks for remembering my original thread. Yes, I've seen the activity and I'm absolutely thrilled. I'd love to know if the owners are doing the renovation or if it's being handled by some kind of historical preservation society. Either way, I cannot believe it's finally happening. I would pay those people to walk through that house. It's like a moment stood still in Houston 1905 and is forever captured. Look at those original horse ties at the front on the street.

I think I saw one of the owners speaking with a painter on the sidewalk but I didn't have the nerve to ask if I could see the house. I'm sure they'd say 'no' from what I've heard. And my husband's convinced that someone would chase me around with a chainsaw if I got in.......... :unsure:

Actually, I'd almost be willing to take that chance! Anyone got any inside scoop on the Westmoreland renovation?????

We just worship that home! Houston history if ever there was!

Everything about it just is cool even the yards. Once completed it would be perfect for a movie location. Imagine a turn of the century ball of Houston aristocracy milling about, etc. This whole block and neighboring homes are fantastico! Belle fortuna! :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's such great news. I lived in the area over 25 years ago and the house was in the same condition back then. I've always loved the design and style (Neo-Classic Greek Revival, I think). I had stopped going by this house a long time ago because I found its condition upsetting. I'll make a special point to swing by there and check it out.

The Waldo Mansion is next door. This house was moved from downtown or midtown. Speaking of movies, the Waldo Mansion was the setting for the kitchen scenes in Terms of Endearment.

Link to post
Share on other sites
We just worship that home! Houston history if ever there was!

Everything about it just is cool even the yards. Once completed it would be perfect for a movie location. Imagine a turn of the century ball of Houston aristocracy milling about, etc. This whole block and neighboring homes are fantastico! Belle fortuna! :D

Hi Vertigo! I think you nailed it when you said "worship." I fall into that category. There is a sense of history I cannot describe, a feeling that comes over me when I drive by that home. It's the architecture, the horse ties, the front door, the columns with the pineapple tops (a symbol of affluence back then), the yards, everything about it is so compelling to me. Sometimes my husband and I just park across the street along the curb and stare at it imagining what life was like back then. At night, the attic room is always lit, sometimes with a jack-o-lantern in the window....I'd LOVE to see what (or who?) is up there! I think it would be amazing to see the interior, the room layouts, fireplaces, kitchen and baths, EVERYTHING!

I have been told that the pool was used in some indie movie back in the 80s (My Best Friend is a Vampire), but when I watched the movie (which was awful) the pool and mansion scenes looked nothing like Westmoreland and more like a movie set, so I doubt it was used.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Vertigo! I think you nailed it when you said "worship." I fall into that category. There is a sense of history I cannot describe, a feeling that comes over me when I drive by that home. It's the architecture, the horse ties, the front door, the columns with the pineapple tops (a symbol of affluence back then), the yards, everything about it is so compelling to me. Sometimes my husband and I just park across the street along the curb and stare at it imagining what life was like back then. At night, the attic room is always lit, sometimes with a jack-o-lantern in the window....I'd LOVE to see what (or who?) is up there! I think it would be amazing to see the interior, the room layouts, fireplaces, kitchen and baths, EVERYTHING!

I have been told that the pool was used in some indie movie back in the 80s (My Best Friend is a Vampire), but when I watched the movie (which was awful) the pool and mansion scenes looked nothing like Westmoreland and more like a movie set, so I doubt it was used.

That w i d e front entry way is what starts the drama and allure of the house. :P I see Edwardian society getting out of horse drawn carriages then onto these steps stopping & chatting or commenting on the flowered gardens then going in for tea. There was once a time in our city.

Imagine a child having a recital and the sounds of the upright piano echoing out into the porch and ladies fanning themselves on a cool brisk evening. A formal garden party with local notables mingling.

The beautiful kitty in your avatar should be resting right in the center of the doorway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That w i d e front entry way is what starts the drama and allure of the house. :P I see Edwardian society getting out of horse drawn carriages then onto these steps stopping & chatting or commenting on the flowered gardens then going in for tea. There was once a time in our city.

Imagine a child having a recital and the sounds of the upright piano echoing out into the porch and ladies fanning themselves on a cool brisk evening. A formal garden party with local notables mingling.

The beautiful kitty in your avatar should be resting right in the center of the doorway.

I couldn't agree more about the entry, it IS stunning. I've often imagined what it would have been like to sit on that porch on a hot summer day or in the evening and watch the street activity. That wrapped porch is so deep and sheltered, you could practically live on it. The glass in the front door looks original to me and I'd love to see where the stairs are. I wonder if it's a simple staircase or a sweeping, more dramatic staircase that leads upstairs. And I've had the same mental images of early 1900's Houston society arriving there for a party or event. I understand the house was rented out for a number of years before the current owners bought it in the 80s.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I couldn't agree more about the entry, it IS stunning. I've often imagined what it would have been like to sit on that porch on a hot summer day or in the evening and watch the street activity. That wrapped porch is so deep and sheltered, you could practically live on it. The glass in the front door looks original to me and I'd love to see where the stairs are. I wonder if it's a simple staircase or a sweeping, more dramatic staircase that leads upstairs. And I've had the same mental images of early 1900's Houston society arriving there for a party or event. I understand the house was rented out for a number of years before the current owners bought it in the 80s.

I was in the area yesterday and went ahead and had to take another glance. I always have to see the left side where the porte-cochere can be seen. As I noted in a seperate topic, these were very common back in the day. Also known as a carriage porch, guests would stop and get off then horse would continue to the back, just like a car. :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porte-cochere

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thought there would be more interest.

Maybe this thread should be merged with this one?

There is interest, I just didn't see this until now. Thanks for posting w/pic! What a porch & entryway. :wub: Nice to know there are still some left, and being cared for. I remember some of these types of homes being in the East End, most have been torn down now. :(

Link to post
Share on other sites
There is interest, I just didn't see this until now. Thanks for posting w/pic! What a porch & entryway. :wub: Nice to know there are still some left, and being cared for. I remember some of these types of homes being in the East End, most have been torn down now. :(

Nena,

We created about Past structures of East End where several old palaces once stood. Try to remember one really beautiful two or three story big house that was right where the Lawndale Post Office is now.

Only remnant are the 2 -3 big palms. :angry:

The house next door to this one above is equally as mysterious I think. The balcony on top with the torn awning makes you think of a Scarlett O'Hara type southern belle waving her scarf from above. (what imagination) but really it evokes such images. :blush:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to miss the peeling paint.

The unrestored house had a unique "wow!" factor. Nearly everyone who saw it had the same urge to be its rescuer, as if it were a sort of architectural lost puppy. Anyone can repaint a house, but to have the audacity to maintain its threadbare elegance for such an extended period required an exceptional sensibility.

After its restoration is complete, it will be a pretty house - and much less memorable.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to miss the peeling paint.

The unrestored house had a unique "wow!" factor. Nearly everyone who saw it had the same urge to be its rescuer, as if it were a sort of architectural lost puppy. Anyone can repaint a house, but to have the audacity to maintain its threadbare elegance for such an extended period required an exceptional sensibility.

After its restoration is complete, it will be a pretty house - and much less memorable.

HA!

My wife said the same thing. That house was creepy as hell.

I'm not sure there's going to be a complete restoration. As it is, it looks like it needs another coat of paint! $$$

Link to post
Share on other sites
HA!

My wife said the same thing. That house was creepy as hell.

I'm not sure there's going to be a complete restoration. As it is, it looks like it needs another coat of paint! $$$

I am thrilled they are finally painting it.

I got a real laugh out of your "creepy" comment. But it is creepy in a good way. :unsure:

The house is so wonderful that it deserves to be saved. As I recall, the front porch is going to need some major rotten wood replaced.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I am thrilled they are finally painting it.

I got a real laugh out of your "creepy" comment. But it is creepy in a good way. :unsure:

The house is so wonderful that it deserves to be saved. As I recall, the front porch is going to need some major rotten wood replaced.

And the porte-cochere needs attention as well.

I drove by there today and there are two contractor signs in the yard.

One is a company that does exterior and interior painting, the other is

a remodeler emphasizing updated kitchens.

Link to post
Share on other sites
And the porte-cochere needs attention as well.

I drove by there today and there are two contractor signs in the yard.

One is a company that does exterior and interior painting, the other is

a remodeler emphasizing updated kitchens.

Certainly hope they owners are reading this? Document all work from beginning to end, notify This Old House, Old House Journal, Old House Interiors and they more than likely will send over a film crew to do in stages, plus place in magazines. Might as well.

Now who is getting the champagne for the inaguration of completion? :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
I'm not sure there's going to be a complete restoration. As it is, it looks like it needs another coat of paint! $$$

Honestly, I've thought the same thing. I have not seen contractor signs in the yard and we drove by it last weekend so they must be recent. But the paint job seems somewhat unfinished and lackluster, as though they could only apply one coat. And much of the upper railings are still missing. The porte cochere is still a mess.

Hey Vertigo, I'll be happy to buy the champagne at its final unveiling if I could just get a tour of the place! :unsure:

Edited by marketingwiz
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey Vertigo, I'll be happy to buy the champagne at its final unveiling if I could just get a tour of the place!

Exactly! but be sure to bring the furry kitty in the avatar for the unveiling everyone will have a purrrrrfect time. :D

and seriously when this place is complete someone should alert the local historical society or preservation org to be in attendance, I will get media coverage anything! This is something Houston needs to be proud of.

Link to post
Share on other sites
and seriously when this place is complete someone should alert the local historical society or preservation org to be in attendance, I will get media coverage anything! This is something Houston needs to be proud of.

Since I am partner in a small ad and PR agency, that's right up my alley! It might give me an excuse to contact the owners and ask permission to get media coverage as well as a tour..... ;) And for some reason, my kitty avatar is not showing today nor is anyone else's. :huh:

Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding, from a close source, is that the guy in the house just to the west simply paid to have a coat of paint thrown on it, because he was "tired of looking at it like that".

It makes me ill even to think about it, but I would say that there is a 90% chance the home will be knocked down within a couple years and replaced with townhomes. The lot is simply too big. Reckless townhome development in that neighborhood has really accelerated in the past year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
My understanding, from a close source, is that the guy in the house just to the west simply paid to have a coat of paint thrown on it, because he was "tired of looking at it like that".

It makes me ill even to think about it, but I would say that there is a 90% chance the home will be knocked down within a couple years and replaced with townhomes. The lot is simply too big. Reckless townhome development in that neighborhood has really accelerated in the past year.

Well that makes more sense now because the owners have said (indirectly quoted) they don't have the money to paint it. According to them it would cost over $1 million to get it repainted and refurbished to original condition, and that, of course, does not include the interior. If it's the homeowner to their west, then it must be the resident in that huge, red brick home with the old awnings. I sensed it was a 'band-aid' kind of job from what I observed.

And I'll chain myself to one of those pillars before they tear it down! :angry2:They'll have to remove me kicking and screaming.

Link to post
Share on other sites
My understanding, from a close source, is that the guy in the house just to the west simply paid to have a coat of paint thrown on it, because he was "tired of looking at it like that".

It makes me ill even to think about it, but I would say that there is a 90% chance the home will be knocked down within a couple years and replaced with townhomes. The lot is simply too big. Reckless townhome development in that neighborhood has really accelerated in the past year.

While many newtownhomes have been constructed throughout the greater Montrose area, none have gone up in the Westmoreland Historic District in quite some time.

The residents here are very protective of the neighborhood, and (one hopes) able to scare developers away.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, there is scaffolding up in the front center of the home and the

contractor signs are still in the yard as of yesterday.

As I said upthread, one of the contractors is for interior restoration

specializing in kitchens, so it appears that more than painting is going on.

Is the neighbor that generous to tackle a paint job that's probably $100K, as well as a kitchen

restoration?

That home is 6600 sq ft on a 15,000+ sq ft lot. It has both historic and

architectural significance. I'm guessing it would be worth around $2 million

if it was restored properly, but I'm neither a realtor or an investor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The residents here are very protective of the neighborhood, and (one hopes) able to scare developers away.

My understanding was if a specific nabe has signs as you enter stating it is a historical area it was untouchable? :mellow: Guess nothing is sacred any more....

Link to post
Share on other sites

We made our bi-weekly drive-by of 215 Westmoreland and although the scaffolding is still up, the paint job is really lagging. Even in twilight, you can see the old rotting wood bleeding through. Perhaps there's another coat of that flat white paint to be applied. And the upper railings on the second story are missing. I'm sure it's better than nothing but what a half-azzed job! My husband and I fantasize about restoring it and what we'd do. That home is screaming to be saved. :( I'll make it my first project after I win the Lottery! We'll have a HAIF party there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the owners of this Nash house. All the repairs are being done to look like the original house. The porch flooring has been replaced with material to match the original. The original cypress columns have been repaired and are back in place. The porch roof has been replaced. The siding has now been repaired on three sides. The carriage entrance is currently being repaired and will have a new roof. The railings on the front and the carriage entrance will be put back as they were in 1907. The first coat of paint is a prime coat and some additional preparation is being done. All wood that needs replacing is being replaced with cypress to match the original. It will have at least two more coats of paint. The contractors have very good reputations and the job is being done very well. The siding, flooring, and much of the trim had to be milled to match the original, but like any good historic restoration as much of the original will be preserved. Some of original plaster brackets are also being molded to match the original.

The owners are paying for this job themselves, and they will keep the house as original as possible. The work is being done with the approval of the city since it is a national historical house.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is great news and something that i was hoping for.

I hope they win a good brick award from the Preservation Society!!

I know the owners of this Nash house. All the repairs are being done to look like the original house. The porch flooring has been replaced with material to match the original. The original cypress columns have been repaired and are back in place. The porch roof has been replaced. The siding has now been repaired on three sides. The carriage entrance is currently being repaired and will have a new roof. The railings on the front and the carriage entrance will be put back as they were in 1907. The first coat of paint is a prime coat and some additional preparation is being done. All wood that needs replacing is being replaced with cypress to match the original. It will have at least two more coats of paint. The contractors have very good reputations and the job is being done very well. The siding, flooring, and much of the trim had to be milled to match the original, but like any good historic restoration as much of the original will be preserved. Some of original plaster brackets are also being molded to match the original.

The owners are paying for this job themselves, and they will keep the house as original as possible. The work is being done with the approval of the city since it is a national historical house.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
I hope that is the truth. I heard my info - that the neighbor paid to have it repainted - at a party just down the street from the house, with several of the neighborhood association's officers in on the discussion.

I don't know who's paying for it but there is progress at 215 Westmoreland! My hubby and I drove by today and saw that a light mint green coat of paint had been applied over the white primer. We had to stop and really look to detect the color but it is there. Assuming that more paint applications are to come, it looks like it will be a lovely mint green with white trim. We think it looks great, and there's also progress on the carriage house area. I will snap a pic next time and post it. I do hope they reinstall the upper railings on the second story. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know who's paying for it but there is progress at 215 Westmoreland! My hubby and I drove by today and saw that a light mint green coat of paint had been applied over the white primer. We had to stop and really look to detect the color but it is there. Assuming that more paint applications are to come, it looks like it will be a lovely mint green with white trim. We think it looks great, and there's also progress on the carriage house area. I will snap a pic next time and post it. I do hope they reinstall the upper railings on the second story. :D

I was surprised at the color choice, and wonder whether it's historically correct. I don't recall seeing that color on other houses from that era. My assumption was that the house had always been painted white.

Regardless, it's a pretty color, and (IMO) not objectionable. I hope to see the ornate bracket which supported (at least visually) the upper porch restored and replaced.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

There was another thread about this house from 2005. Anyway, regarding the color, there is a black and white photo from some publication and it appears to be two-tone. It's hard to tell, but the walls seem darker than the trim.

I can't find the other thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband and I drove by 215 Westmoreland just yesterday and it is coming along magnificently. Kudos to the owners of the 'Nash House' for restoring it. The painting seems complete and they are now restoring the railings to the front porch and balcony. Right now they are still natural wood but we're hoping they'll be painted white to match the rest of the house. I promise to take a photo this week and post it for all to see. I do think these homeowners deserve a 'Good Brick' award from the GHPA and will look into finding out criteria for nomination. I cannot believe how far this home has come since we first discovered it driving around one Sunday afternoon almost 3 years ago. :DWhat a job!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...