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Camp Logan Cemetary?


Whitesman

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That's the first I've heard of a Camp Logan cemetery.

I looked at the key map, and 492M is appx bordered by

S.Shepherd on the west, Floyd Street to the north,

W. Dallas to the south, and Waugh/Yale to the east.

Pretty big area to search using the bird images. :(

I looked and saw a few places a cemetery could hiding,

but couldn't really make anything out.

492M is a good ways to the east from Camp Logan/Memorial

Park.

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That's the first I've heard of a Camp Logan cemetery.

I looked at the key map, and 492M is appx bordered by

S.Shepherd on the west, Floyd Street to the north,

W. Dallas to the south, and Waugh/Yale to the east.

Pretty big area to search using the bird images. :(

I looked and saw a few places a cemetery could hiding,

but couldn't really make anything out.

492M is a good ways to the east from Camp Logan/Memorial

Park.

How about some coordinates? Latitude 29

Edited by FilioScotia
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That same site says "Reported under the building at Shepherd and Buffalo Bayou" - not sure what it is referring to

The only "building" now standing at Shepherd and Buffalo Bayou is St. Thomas High School.

I'm more inclined to go by those coordinates that place it a few blocks to the northwest of that spot. That's where Google Earth puts the coordinates. There is, after all, an open space there that could be the site of an old cemetery.

Google Maps are known for their lack of precision.

I'll check it out on my way home this afternoon

Edited by FilioScotia
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I'll check it out on my way home this afternoon

Yeah, I'm not going to be able to look into it any further for a while. I'm thinking that emailing the person who posted the information might be the only way to get any more solid info without hitting the books... I'm guessing the cemetery website folks put some effort into finding an exact location already and just have an approximate one, hence the approximation on the coordinates.

Will check back to see what others can find!

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Camp Logan was a hastily assembled, temporary camp for training soldiers during WWI, and I seriously doubt that they would have a cemetery dedicated solely for the few soldiers that would have died during training or during treatment at Camp Logan Hospital. Since this was an Illinois Guardsman camp, any casualties would have, most likely, been returned home. Unlike Fort Sam Houston that has been around for 140 years (40 years at the time of WWI), Camp Logan existed less than two years and would have no need for a veterans/military cemetery.

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In Trevia Wooster Beverly's book "At Rest: A Historical Directory of Harris County, Texas, Cemeteries," she says the cemetery is believed to be "under a building at Shepherd and Buffalo Bayou, supposedly now the Hillside Apartments condominiums." This information is unverifable, though, according to the book.

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Camp Logan was a hastily assembled, temporary camp for training soldiers during WWI, and I seriously doubt that they would have a cemetery dedicated solely for the few soldiers that would have died during training or during treatment at Camp Logan Hospital. Since this was an Illinois Guardsman camp, any casualties would have, most likely, been returned home. Unlike Fort Sam Houston that has been around for 140 years (40 years at the time of WWI), Camp Logan existed less than two years and would have no need for a veterans/military cemetery.

I'll give you this - in the case of each of the Camp Logan deaths I've been able to find quickly on the internet, the body was apparently shipped home.

However, 30,000 men were stationed at Camp Logan. Also, the Spanish flu pandemic hit in 1918, while the camp was still active, and it is estimated (as Gonzo's blog notes) that 600-700 cases were reported at Camp Logan - military camps being among the worst places to be during an epidemic at that time. Granted, not all of those cases would have turned to pneumonia (which is generally what killed people) - and the book Fever of War: The Influenza Epidemic in the U.S. Army During World War I suggests that Camp Logan may have fared better in this respect than many camps because of early hospitalization - but there still would have been far more than a few deaths at the camp during the epidemic.

Based on that, I think it is possible there was a camp cemetery - though I would need more information before I believe that there actually was one.

In Trevia Wooster Beverly's book "At Rest: A Historical Directory of Harris County, Texas, Cemeteries," she says the cemetery is believed to be "under a building at Shepherd and Buffalo Bayou, supposedly now the Hillside Apartments condominiums." This information is unverifable, though, according to the book.

Thanks for checking. A 10/28/1999 Chron article places the apartment complex "on Memorial Drive, just east of Shepherd." I think that Trevia Wooster Beverly's email address is treviawbeverly@comcast.net, if someone wants to ask for more information.

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Camp Logan was a hastily assembled, temporary camp for training soldiers during WWI, and I seriously doubt that they would have a cemetery dedicated solely for the few soldiers that would have died during training or during treatment at Camp Logan Hospital. Since this was an Illinois Guardsman camp, any casualties would have, most likely, been returned home. Unlike Fort Sam Houston that has been around for 140 years (40 years at the time of WWI), Camp Logan existed less than two years and would have no need for a veterans/military cemetery.

Before it was a WW1 training camp, the area was a National Guard training camp. And the camp hospital building was in use until 1925. Agreed that most of the soldiers trained there were from Illinois, but many from the Houston/Galveston area also were trained there also.

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Before it was a WW1 training camp, the area was a National Guard training camp. And the camp hospital building was in use until 1925. Agreed that most of the soldiers trained there were from Illinois, but many from the Houston/Galveston area also were trained there also.

While the hospital was used until 1925, it ceased being a military hospital in 1919. I would think that any troops from the area which died would be claimed by their families.

I'm always willing to admit when I'm wrong and will if proven so in this case. It just seems impractical to have a cemetery dedicated to Camp Logan.

I would think an easy way to determine is to check maps of the era in the Texas room. While I haven't been there in years, I recall that they had many from the period.

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  • 3 months later...

Were there Sanborn Maps for Texas? If so maybe if someone has access to them they might show if there was a cemetery located anywhere near the above mentioned location. And, if there are not Sanborn Maps for Texas I'm sure there must be some other kinds of maps used for insurance purposes. What do you think? I'm sure the architects and builders on this site would know. :ph34r:

CampLogan1917

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  • 4 years later...

Before it was a WW1 training camp, the area was a National Guard training camp. And the camp hospital building was in use until 1925. Agreed that most of the soldiers trained there were from Illinois, but many from the Houston/Galveston area also were trained there also.

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See post #9 ~ That would explain why it was named Rice "MILITARY" before the WWII training camp was there. I was looking for an explanation, since I read that the neighborhood was called RM before the WWI occupation of the area. William M. Rice & brother owned land there, at one time. And I assumed it had a military link that predated WWI.

The property close by, between Detering and Reinerman, Washington and Buffalo Bayou was at one time referred to as Smokeytown or Smokeville (census)? The name is on an early Houston Topo. map, probably linked to coal/ railroad workers of causasian and African American heritage, who lived in the area. I have read two different accounts of a black cemetery at the Memorial Park Condo location (demolished now?), Swamplot reference. Did they build over the graves? Felix Croom and family are supposed to be buried at that location. Mr. Crooms died around 1917. The West End Research page also goes into much detail about a black cemetery at that location, started by a man named Edward Rosco (year 1881, bought .92 acre for a graveyard). The researcher describes the cemetery with the gully located on it, now where the condos are located...what happened to the cemetery? Bad karma.

http://swamplot.com/tag/park-memorial-condominiums/

https://sites.google.com/site/cemeteriesofharriscotexas/crooms-family-cemetery

http://www.ricemilitary.org/documents/history.htm

The last link has great detailed research by H. Neal Parker...see specifically the Caffey Tract under 1.) Heli Hurd...several paragraphs about the cemetery land.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/houston_nw22.jpg ... the map

Edited by NenaE
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  • 2 weeks later...
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Then there is the little infamous Camp Logan riot's that would have really enticed the military and pwers that be to erase and rapidly redevelop as soon as possible. A cemetary would also have been set aside on the area's deed plat maps of that period. I would assume the Harris County archives might be of use there. Unfortunately, none of that is available for a midnight webb browse - you have to get it the old fashioned way by physically digging and snooping.

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  • 10 months later...
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In the early to mid 50's I lived in 5000 block of Gibson. We used to play near an old cemetery just north of Memorial drive. If you look on the Google map you will see a short street named Chandler street. At the far west end of Chandler it dead ends, between there and Memorial drive is the exact location of the old Cemetery, Now there are apartments built on top of it. The graves in it were all old with birth dates from the late 1800's could very well be the cemetery that you are looking for. It is right in the neighborhood of the lost location.

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A little more information on the old cemetery. I have posted some aerial shots from 1957, 1964 and present day, and a Google street picture of the now vacant apartments that are build over the old cemetery. The boundaries are in red showing the location of the cemetery. The boundaries are approximate and it may extend down closer to Memorial or a little more to the west, I do remember that it did not go all the way down to Memorial Drive. It was an abandoned cemetery and not kept up. It was in the a stand of trees and I can only assume that most people in the area never knew it existed except for maybe a few old timers. Some of the head stones had toppled and were laying on the ground. The area was all grown up with vines as well. In the first picture from 1957 you can see a vacant lot directly to the east of the grove of trees. The elevation of the vacant lot was lower than that of the cemetery. There was about a ten or fifteen foot bluff that you had to climb to get up to the cemetery from the lot, however you could access the cemetery without a climb if you gained access from Chandler street. I remember an old tree on the edge of the bluff with its roots exposed from the years of erosion on the bluff. Some of the neighborhood boys built a fort with in the exposed roots and would fend off other neighborhood kids from the high ground with their BB guns trying to gain entrance to their fort. The next day the tables would be turned and the kids feeling the sting of the BB's from the day before would be the ones holding the fort. At the end of the day they were still friends. There was no gangs in the neighborhoods in those days.

In picture two from 1964 you can see that some apartments have been built on the vacant lot east of the cemetery. In that picture you can see the cemetery is still untouched. If you look close you can see that something has been built in front of the old cemetery on Memorial Drive, but did not infringe on the cemetery.

In picture three, the present day picture, you can see that some apartments have been built there. According to the historical aerials maps there was some building going on there as early as 1981, and in 2002 you can see that they are finished and in 2004 the building are still there. Some time after 2004 those apartments were torn down and some news ones built and now they are now abandoned and from the aerial picture they look like they are being torn down. Why did the new apartments last less than ten years? It leads me to wonder if spooky things were happening there, after all they were build on sacred ground. That leads to another question. When and where were the graves moved to? It would be hard for me to believe that they were just plowed under and the apartments built on top of them.

The last picture made from Chandler street shows the apartments that were sitting directly on top of what was once the cemetery.

 

Note, after I posted this, I started reading Nena E's post above and it has a lot to say about this cemetery and the possibility that the graves actually may have been bull dozed over to build the apartments. I do not see or understand how anyone could have done this without knowing it was a cemetery, as there were plenty of head stones clearly marking this as a cemetery as last as 1957 when I was playing in the near by area. I have walked through the cemetery and looked at the many head stones and wondered about the people that were buried there. This could be a case of someone putting money ahead of respect for the dead. 
 

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Edited by Michelle C
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  • 3 weeks later...

Some of the research mentioned the lack of actual legal paperwork, in the form of land deeds, agreements, etc. Some early agreements were verbal, or not well documented due to the acting parties illiteracy. This may explain why some graves could not be located. Nice to hear your stories of the land, Michelle. There are not many of the old homes left. I drove through the area a while ago.

I've not seen any paperwork of graves ever being moved. Makes you wonder.

I've noticed many early Houston cemeteries were located near the bayous. Some graves have been lost to the deterioration of banks, floods. The apartments could actually suffer from unstable foundations, due to the sloping, shoddy design.

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