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Houston Googie?


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It was torn down a few years ago. There was also a beautiful blue-tiled, 1960's dentist office bldg. rt. by the carwash/gas station. They recently covered/messed most of it up with that hardi-plank stuff. What a shame. You can still see the tile work on the ends of the bldg. Those tiny tiles. Shades of blue. How depressing, hopefully they are still underneath.

I tried to resize this pic, didn't work. I'm aggravated... :angry: Anyone know what's wrong? Anyway, here's the pic of that tile work. Googie-ish roof.

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Homes-Southeast012.jpg

Edited by NenaE
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Thanks for posting the picture!

and I hope that helps...just cropped it a bit

Thanks for the quick fix Sevfiv, :) I've added a detail picture of the tilework. (See above post). It was taken recently, believe it or not, from the ends of the bldg. that are not covered. At least not yet. :o:angry2: The concrete Gulfgate fountains had something like that tilework on the inside of them. Just love it.

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Lyons Avenue Health Center, maybe? Looks pretty angular:

I am almost certain that is the one at Lyons and Lockwood (or near) in edge of Denver Harbor area by RR tracks. It has been added onto and remuddled since I can last recall getting a booster shot there around 1967 as a child? Whoah! By then it was time to split the scene if you will. :ph34r:

The TSO about a block further east still had those 1950's specktacle frames (cat eye glasses) as the sign above the entrance. Major throw back.

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I think its recently been modernized. Rats, we were too late. The Fiesta in back used to be a Weingarten's too. Amazing it is still there!

PS, some of the best old fashioned "real" Mexican restuarants will be found all along this strech of Lyons. Really.

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I am almost certain that is the one at Lyons and Lockwood (or near) in edge of Denver Harbor area by RR tracks. It has been added onto and remuddled since I can last recall getting a booster shot there around 1967 as a child? Whoah! By then it was time to split the scene if you will. :ph34r:

Nope, Vertigo, but you do know the location of this one. It's right off the Gulf Freeway (I-45S), where the Glenbrook Golf Course meets the freeway, next to the Dairy Queen, & the "used-to-be" ;) Bonanza. And the "river rock front" apartments we have talked about before.

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Thanks for the quick fix Sevfiv, :) I've added a detail picture of the tilework. (See above post). It was taken recently, believe it or not, from the ends of the bldg. that are not covered. At least not yet. :o:angry2: The concrete Gulfgate fountains had something like that tilework on the inside of them. Just love it.

In fact, this very same tilework has made a big comeback! Have seen in several new venues around the city.

It is dazzling and never seem to go out of style. :)

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"Any favorites out there? Folded roofs? swoopy facades? Any great bowling alleys? signs? service stations?"

When I first moved here in 1980, Bellaire was a regular Googie City USA. Dang the Southwestern Bank of Texas for tearing down their spectacular bank at 5301 Bissonnet. They're slowly getting rid of what's left. Spring Branch is the same way, but they're not as quick to demolish as Bellaire.

If you care to Googie for God, nothing beats the Park Place Baptist Church on 4101 Broadway (1961). I don't know if "big inanimate objects" qualify as Googie, but the Freeway Baptist Church at 144 Winkler has a big stone bible above the entrance, though the rest of the building is pretty non-descript. Brochsteins (1947) at 11530 Main has one big pylon in front. The old Houston Post building (1970) has pylons, too, but is a little too late in the genre and not "wild" enough. In a different part of town, try the Unity National Bank Building at 2602 Blodgett (1963), or perhaps the building that was HQ for NASA (2999 S. Wayside, 1957) while the JSC was being built.

If you're looking for Googie, look at what areas were developed when it was in style. I love the Phoenix Insurance Co. Building at 3323 Richmond (1961). Also, there's the Bellfort Square Office Building (1966) at 6711 Bellfort. And if ever there was a Googie skyscraper, it would be the Bank One Building (1962) at 1001 East Southmore.

A possible residential candidate would be a Bruce Goff creation at 323 Tynebrook Lane (1960), or perhaps 3403 North Parkwood in Riverside Terrace. (Yes, of "This Is Our Home: It Is Not For Sale" fame.) One of the craziest buildings ever was build in 1985 by Arquitectonica at 2627 Colquitt Street. It's like a Googie homage. You just have to see it; a teaser: the windows are parallelograms!

I'm posting the side view of an old gas station (Sinclair?) on Witte in Spring Branch. I know I have other views, but I can't find them right now. Love those pylons! :P

post-757-1212301235_thumb.jpg

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Please don't take this as rude. All of your examples are important modern landmarks and most of them frequently discussed on these forums. Few of them are Googie.

If you care to Googie for God, nothing beats the Park Place Baptist Church on 4101 Broadway (1961).

I'm not terribly comfortable calling any institutional building Googie, as this style was very commonly used for schools and community buildings. But I'll let it go because of the folded plate canopy.

I don't know if "big inanimate objects" qualify as Googie, but the Freeway Baptist Church at 144 Winkler has a big stone bible above the entrance, though the rest of the building is pretty non-descript.

Not Googie, but interesting.

Brochsteins (1947) at 11530 Main has one big pylon in front.

Beautiful Streamline Moderne, not even close to Googie.

The old Houston Post building (1970) has pylons, too, but is a little too late in the genre and not "wild" enough.

It's one of the last remaining and best New Brutalist buildings, like the Alley Theatre.

In a different part of town, try the Unity National Bank Building at 2602 Blodgett (1963),

Surprised no one has mentioned this one yet. I'm afraid I have to call it... GOOGIE! Good eye!

or perhaps the building that was HQ for NASA (2999 S. Wayside, 1957) while the JSC was being built.

Karl Kamrath, may he rest in peace, is going to come haunt you if you keep calling his beautiful organic buildings Googie.

If you're looking for Googie, look at what areas were developed when it was in style. I love the Phoenix Insurance Co. Building at 3323 Richmond (1961). Also, there's the Bellfort Square Office Building (1966) at 6711 Bellfort.

We've been arguing about the Phoenix building, most people aren't too willing to admit to Googie for that. I posted the Bellfort Square building myself. Weird but I don't really think it's Googie.

And if ever there was a Googie skyscraper, it would be the Bank One Building (1962) at 1001 East Southmore.

No, it's Wrightian organic. Karl Kamrath is really going to haunt you when he finishes spinning in his grave!

A possible residential candidate would be a Bruce Goff creation at 323 Tynebrook Lane (1960), or perhaps 3403 North Parkwood in Riverside Terrace. (Yes, of "This Is Our Home: It Is Not For Sale" fame.)

No, Goff is an organic Expressionist. The Parkwood house is an exuberant Mid-Century Modern.

One of the craziest buildings ever was build in 1985 by Arquitectonica at 2627 Colquitt Street. It's like a Googie homage. You just have to see it; a teaser: the windows are parallelograms!
Well, I would admit that this is more Googie-ish than many Arquitectonica buildings but they are usually considered to be postmodern instead of Googie.
I'm posting the side view of an old gas station (Sinclair?) on Witte in Spring Branch. I know I have other views, but I can't find them right now. Love those pylons! :P

post-757-1212301235_thumb.jpg

OK, yes, I'll go along with Googie. More for the outward-slanting windows than the pylon.

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  • 1 year later...

"Would the RedCarpet Inn on 45 be considered Googie? It is not in great shape, but I have always liked this building... "

Could be "googie"... formerly this was a Howard Johnson's.

Yeah, I'll give it a Googie thumbs up. Roofs that sweep down to the ground can be a Goog-ish feature.

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Googie seems to mean anything that is gestural and expressionistic to the perception of the automobile driver. Never mind the fact that it's need to be noticed is directly related to the distraction of the driver; but why let an ethical logic impede the free market especially back in those times. Which is why I do not like Googie in principle; it's untalented imitators merely produced the campy & kitsch laden precursors to full blown Postmodernism.

The modern equivalent would be Hypergraphics.

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“The modern equivalent would be Hypergraphics.”

Well, you get points for taking this topic to a place I never would have anticipated – and to a theoretical platform I have difficulty understanding (but maybe that’s the point of it). For those unfamiliar with this term, look up “Hypergraphics” on Wikipedia… see what I mean.

Your reference to post-modern – which is really a fancy term for kitsch – is probably closer to home. Both avenues are self serving but by far, post-modern is grating and often difficult to warm up to whereas Googie has an endearing effect due in part to its connection to a specific milieu.

The excellent book “Googie: Fifties Coffee Shop Architecture” by Alan Hess explores the roots of Googie and its link to the emerging car culture of the 50’s and early 60’s (which by then the car culture was firmly established).

For whatever reason – be it recollections of l-o-n-g vacations traveling in a car as a boy during the 1960's, or simply the dynamic interplay of forms and materials – Googie remains a favorite architectural form for me.

I wish Houston possessed more of it.

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  • 1 year later...

Is that this little guy?

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]

The Delmar Field House is also mentioned:

"(1958) Milton McGinty

The thin-shell paraboloid roof canopy of this gymnasium represents a comparatively rare local use of a technology that was quite popular in American architecture during the late 1950s and early 1960s."

The Meadowcreek Village shelter was designed by Raymond Brogniez, who graduated from Harvard's Graduate School of Design under Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer.

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