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Back To The 50's


jakdad

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Heard all about it from mom & dad. Especially the music. They were young parents...mom says it was a neat period to grow up in. My dad and uncle had 57 chevys. Always talked about how fast those V8 engines were.

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Let's see, you got 57T-bird, FilioScotia, H2B, and Redscare............ :blink:

Well... I'm going to my 55th HS reunion down there this November, so that will give you a clue as to my relation to that period. It was an absolutely wonderful period to "come of age" in. Wouldn't trade it for any decade since. My first car was a '51 Chevy, then a '56 Ford, and, most recently... what else but a '57 T'bird.

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1955, St. Joseph's Hospital.

I can remember climbing a tree in our front yard with my older brothers and sister in the late 1950's just as the sun was setting just to watch the cartoons showing at the Post Oak Drive-In. Our house was west of Chimney Rock, but we still had an unobstructed view.

Does that count as "far enough back"?

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I still remember watching Ike and his bald head on TV quite a bit..

Being I'm a 56'er, the tail end is all I remember. I remember

quite a few of the TV shows of the late 50's. Capt Kangaroo,

77 Sunset Strip, Gunsmoke, Wagon Train, etc, ad nausium..

I remember the beginnings of the space program pretty well.

I can remember watching Mercury launches and flights during the

day, with my baby sitter usually ironing clothes while I watched... :/

Course, that was in the early 60's. I was in school by the time JFK

was shot.

I didn't really keep up with music much in the 50's, but I remember

our record player would spit out Les Paul and Mary Ford, and

some of the big band stuff like Glenn Miller, etc.. I still remember

the album covers, and I can remember Glenn Millers "In the Mood"

playing quite a bit. I didn't know the name then, but hearing it again

in later years, I recognized it and found out what it was I heard back

then.. :/

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  • 1 month later...

I was born at the Heights Hospital in 1951. We lived near where Pinemont crosses N Shepard on Brinkman. At that time the city limits was only a couple of blocks north of our house. Went to Hohl Elementary and Hamilton Junior High. Moved away after the 9th grade. I'm in the oil and gas business and still visit Houston frequently. Lot's of memories.

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I was born at the Heights Hospital in 1951. We lived near where Pinemont crosses N Shepard on Brinkman. At that time the city limits was only a couple of blocks north of our house. Went to Hohl Elementary and Hamilton Junior High. Moved away after the 9th grade. I'm in the oil and gas business and still visit Houston frequently. Lot's of memories.

If you could, describe what you remember of you neighborhood at that time. Were there still farms around there? What stores did you shop at? Were their still some forest in the area? etc.

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I wasn't born yet but have always loved hearing about those days from big sis and the family. Being the family historian of sorts, I always get a kick out of having the old photos copied and enlarged. Luckily, I still have most of the family to ask what each pic was about or who and what the event was. Just seeing the cars and styles and hearing about prices and local eateries and such is what keeps me tuned in. Everything from movies, television & especially music of that time are of even more interest to me.

What's really peculiar is back in High School (78-79) we always had 50's day so everyone dressed up 50's ala TV show Happy Day's. So I imagine now kids would dress 80's day? Wow, kind of funny/scary. :ph34r::D

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If you could, describe what you remember of you neighborhood at that time. Were there still farms around there? What stores did you shop at? Were their still some forest in the area? etc.

Brinkman and Sue Marie Lane were parallel streets running north off of Pinemont. (At that time -as I recall, Tidwell did not extend west of Shepard and Donavan did not extend west of Brinkman.) Our house was the first north of Pinemont on Brinkman. Sue Marie was a dead end. Brinkman ended turning east onto Donavan - now the location of St. Pias X HS. The areas north of Sue Marie was still a heavily wooded pine forest. There were cattle on the property and the neighborhood kids called it the "Bull Woods". Our parents warned us constantly about the deadly hazards of entering the Bull Woods. You can imagine how thrilling it was to cheat death and walk a short distance into the woods. The fence line separating our neighborhood from the Bull Woods was the Houston City limit. (Even though our neighborhood was just inside the city limit, we did not have city services - sewer or water - until the late 50s.)

The lot to the immediate south of our house at the corner of Pinemont Road and Brinkman Street was always vacant as it is today. Why this lot has stayed vacant is a great mystery to me. The lot was wooded and fallow with plenty of trees, bushes, poison ivy, blackberry vines, snakes, bugs, and turtles. We picked many coffee cans full of blackberries in that lot. The lot behind us faced Sue Marie Lane was vacant and not heavily wooded. The Sue Marie lot was our neighborhood sandlot baseball and football field. Most of the kids I played with lived on Sue Marie.

The location of St. Pius X HS was still forest. When the bulldozers moved in to clear for construction of the school, our neighborhood was overrun by snakes.

I can remember that the first grocery store (early supermarket) that we shopped at was the "Texas Serv-all" on the NE corner of Shepard and Crosstimbers. My first encounter with Santa Claus was at the Sears store on the east side of Shepard at Garden Oaks Blvd.

There was a small amusment park on the SW corner of Curtin Ln and Shepard. I can't remember the name, but "______ Playland" seems vaguely familiar. The park had a small carosel, hand-crank cars on a track, a boat carosel, etc. Lots of fun and memories.

Haircuts happened at Green's Barber Shop on the W side of Shepard at Janisch or Martin Rd. Green sliced into my ear with his scissors when I was about 3 years old. My head was probably on a swivle at the time, so I guess he couldn't prevent the ear incident.

Janisch Rd was named after the Janisch Family. In the 50s and 60s they still had a small truck farm between Janisch and Martin roads, east of Shepard and west of Yale.

In the early 60s my parents sold the Brinkman house. We made the long distance move directly east to Hohldale St between Yale and Sheaprd. I'm not sure why we did this except for a small change of scenery.

I'll add more as time and memory permit.

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Brinkman and Sue Marie Lane were parallel streets running north off of Pinemont. (At that time -as I recall, Tidwell did not extend west of Shepard and Donavan did not extend west of Brinkman.) Our house was the first north of Pinemont on Brinkman. Sue Marie was a dead end. Brinkman ended turning east onto Donavan - now the location of St. Pias X HS. The areas north of Sue Marie was still a heavily wooded pine forest. There were cattle on the property and the neighborhood kids called it the "Bull Woods". Our parents warned us constantly about the deadly hazards of entering the Bull Woods. You can imagine how thrilling it was to cheat death and walk a short distance into the woods. The fence line separating our neighborhood from the Bull Woods was the Houston City limit. (Even though our neighborhood was just inside the city limit, we did not have city services - sewer or water - until the late 50s.)

The lot to the immediate south of our house at the corner of Pinemont Road and Brinkman Street was always vacant as it is today. Why this lot has stayed vacant is a great mystery to me. The lot was wooded and fallow with plenty of trees, bushes, poison ivy, blackberry vines, snakes, bugs, and turtles. We picked many coffee cans full of blackberries in that lot. The lot behind us faced Sue Marie Lane was vacant and not heavily wooded. The Sue Marie lot was our neighborhood sandlot baseball and football field. Most of the kids I played with lived on Sue Marie.

The location of St. Pius X HS was still forest. When the bulldozers moved in to clear for construction of the school, our neighborhood was overrun by snakes.

I can remember that the first grocery store (early supermarket) that we shopped at was the "Texas Serv-all" on the NE corner of Shepard and Crosstimbers. My first encounter with Santa Claus was at the Sears store on the east side of Shepard at Garden Oaks Blvd.

There was a small amusment park on the SW corner of Curtin Ln and Shepard. I can't remember the name, but "______ Playland" seems vaguely familiar. The park had a small carosel, hand-crank cars on a track, a boat carosel, etc. Lots of fun and memories.

Haircuts happened at Green's Barber Shop on the W side of Shepard at Janisch or Martin Rd. Green sliced into my ear with his scissors when I was about 3 years old. My head was probably on a swivle at the time, so I guess he couldn't prevent the ear incident.

Janisch Rd was named after the Janisch Family. In the 50s and 60s they still had a small truck farm between Janisch and Martin roads, east of Shepard and west of Yale.

In the early 60s my parents sold the Brinkman house. We made the long distance move directly east to Hohldale St between Yale and Sheaprd. I'm not sure why we did this except for a small change of scenery.

I'll add more as time and memory permit.

That land was part of the S.W. Allen Survey of 2404 acres. The subdivision is called Pine Forest Annex and it looks from the Harris County Block books that your lot was lot 4 of Pine Forest Annex, with the address 5215 Brinkman.

The owners of that land at the time the subdivision was platted were named George Elbert Castiller and M.F. James.

The street Sue Marie was named for George Castiller's daughter, Susan Marie Castiller. George's wife was named Jean Marie Bulter Castiller.

Pinemont used to be called Pearson Street. Was it called that when you were growing up?

BTW...the empty lot is actually 3 separate properties running north-south. Two are owned by the same person.

Edited by isuredid
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That land was part of the S.W. Allen Survey of 2404 acres. The subdivision is called Pine Forest Annex and it looks from the Harris County Block books that your lot was lot 4 of Pine Forest Annex, with the address 5215 Brinkman.

The owners of that land at the time the subdivision was platted were named George Elbert Castiller and M.F. James.

The street Sue Marie was named for George Castiller's daughter, Susan Marie Castiller. George's wife was named Jean Marie Bulter Castiller.

Pinemont used to be called Pearson Street. Was it called that when you were growing up?

BTW...the empty lot is actually 3 separate properties running north-south. Two are owned by the same person.

I seem to remember that Pinemont did have a different name when pavement only extended as far west as Ella. Beyond Ella it was unimproved. It was entended to the Hempstead Hwy in the mid-50s. I think that's when it was renamed. Pinemont became a major EW street. Truck traffic became terrible. All night long trucks would be engine-braking as the approached Shepard. My father complained all the time about not being able to sleep. That's one of the reason we moved.

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Let's see, you got 57T-bird, FilioScotia, H2B, and Redscare............ :blink:

Hey, what am I, chopped liver??? As some of you have gleaned, I was born in old Methodist Hospital, downtown, long gone, in 1941. Thus the 1950's were my prime years and I loved it! For those of you extremely young ones who may doubt our memory function, just stop right there. Ask anyone and you'll get the same answer, it was the true golden age for teenagers. And I must say Houston was a great place then for it.

As for the primitive side, West University was pretty well established from my first memories, but when we moved into our house on University Blvd. in 1941, my mother said she could see all the way to Bellaire Blvd. with only a house or two between. In the mid-50's, once you got beyond Prince's Drive In and Playland Park, prairie and cows all the way to Sugarland. Pre-freeways, developments were pretty sparse. Think no Galleria, to head for San Antone, we took Post Oak (regular street) to Katy Rd. Westheimer was out in the country heading westward from Post Oak. And a trip to Galveston was a slow crawl down a 2 lane road.

A wee comparison to "modern life" will give you an idea. Zero crime in my neighborhood. I never saw any kind of drugs, including weed, nor knew anyone who indulged. We were really free and not because our parents weren't strict. Imagine now turning loose a pack of 14 year olds to go on their own to Galveston for the day and evening with absolutely nothing to worry about. We got our unrestricted driver's licenses at 14. A small child could ride the public bus downtown alone and be safe, I did it many times to go to library or meet mother for lunch in summer. The clothes were cool sans nudity, the cars out of this world, so much fun to have and no weltschmerz! We really did not worry at all about "the bomb," in spite of those drills under the desk at school.

Eat your hearts out, those who missed it. My own daughter is forever envious, she doomed to grow up in the 70's & '80's.

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I'm proud to have grown up in the 90's! When I moved to Spring, I rode my bike to school, played outside in the subdivision with the rest of the neighborhood kids till sunset. I'm happy I had a childhood before the Internet craze. I still had my video games, but I was outside all the time.

My dad always talks about growing up. Even though it was the early sixties, in Lake Arthur, Louisiana. His dad (my grandfather) Owned a car dealership in Jennings, and my father would trade cars in Houston ever so often (with some dealership a little up 45). He was only 15 or so, and on the way back, the state troopers would stop him and they would drive the new cars really fast down Hwy 90, and my father would follow in the trooper's car with the lights & siren. "If you were tall enough to see over the bar, you could have a drink" he always brags.

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Hey, what am I, chopped liver??? As some of you have gleaned, I was born in old Methodist Hospital, downtown, long gone, in 1941. Thus the 1950's were my prime years and I loved it! For those of you extremely young ones who may doubt our memory function, just stop right there. Ask anyone and you'll get the same answer, it was the true golden age for teenagers. And I must say Houston was a great place then for it.

As for the primitive side, West University was pretty well established from my first memories, but when we moved into our house on University Blvd. in 1941, my mother said she could see all the way to Bellaire Blvd. with only a house or two between. In the mid-50's, once you got beyond Prince's Drive In and Playland Park, prairie and cows all the way to Sugarland. Pre-freeways, developments were pretty sparse. Think no Galleria, to head for San Antone, we took Post Oak (regular street) to Katy Rd. Westheimer was out in the country heading westward from Post Oak. And a trip to Galveston was a slow crawl down a 2 lane road.

A wee comparison to "modern life" will give you an idea. Zero crime in my neighborhood. I never saw any kind of drugs, including weed, nor knew anyone who indulged. We were really free and not because our parents weren't strict. Imagine now turning loose a pack of 14 year olds to go on their own to Galveston for the day and evening with absolutely nothing to worry about. We got our unrestricted driver's licenses at 14. A small child could ride the public bus downtown alone and be safe, I did it many times to go to library or meet mother for lunch in summer. The clothes were cool sans nudity, the cars out of this world, so much fun to have and no weltschmerz! We really did not worry at all about "the bomb," in spite of those drills under the desk at school.

Eat your hearts out, those who missed it. My own daughter is forever envious, she doomed to grow up in the 70's & '80's.

West U Native, I was born in the old Methodist Hospital, too - but in 1938! Your recollections of the good times kids had in our childhood and teen years brought back memories. Unlike you, I was an only child with few friends and over-protective parents. My interests in classical music, the visual arts, literature, history, foreign cultures and travel were not those of my contemporaries in the 'hood, so frequent trips on the bus to the downtown library were my escape from reality.

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West U Native, I was born in the old Methodist Hospital, too - but in 1938! Your recollections of the good times kids had in our childhood and teen years brought back memories. Unlike you, I was an only child with few friends and over-protective parents. My interests in classical music, the visual arts, literature, history, foreign cultures and travel were not those of my contemporaries in the 'hood, so frequent trips on the bus to the downtown library were my escape from reality.

How cool, you are the first person I've "met" born in my hospital! I think it was falling out of favor or getting ready to close by the time I came along in May 1941. There was only one other baby born there when I was. I know this because my mother used to joke (?) that when she first saw me, she told the nurses there must have been a mix up with the babies. They told her impossible, the only other kid in the Nursery was an Hispanic boy.

I too was an only child, but had cousins in Southside Place, just 5 blocks down the street. I was interested in the same sort of things you were, I alone in my family. So I went singularly to Museum of Fine Arts, downtown Library, old Music Hall for matinee shows, all that jazz. I even took a bus to the old Houston Auditorium with violin in hand for auditions with Houston Youth Symphony Orchestra, that place was spooky. It seems so strange now for a 10 or 11 year old to be traipsing around the big city all alone.

My Step-Father worked for Missouri-Pacific and I had a free pass, so spent a lot of travel time in trains alone as well, visiting my Father's family in Dallas and one big trip to Louisville and back by myself. I guess it instilled self-reliance and maturity, but kind of lonely too.

Don't you still love the old days at the Julia Ideson? Like stepping into a movie set with all the heavy wood trim and the little separate rooms. The big, glass box was impressive when it came along mainly for its incredible collections, could find most anything there. Got the best of both, my daughter was raised with the newer one.

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Hey, what am I, chopped liver??? As some of you have gleaned, I was born in old Methodist Hospital, downtown, long gone, in 1941.
West U Native, I was born in the old Methodist Hospital, too - but in 1938!

WestU and Silver... Help me out here. Part of my very young childhood in the early-mid 40's was spent in a house on Elgin. We lived not far from what I think was the old Methodist Hospital, which you say was "downtown". I remember a hospital that was located just a few blocks from us on Anita or Tuam and between Fannin and San Jacinto, I think. Was that the old Methodist Hospital? I used to help an older friend deliver newspapers to the patients in their rooms there.

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57Tbird, you are right about the location - that was the old Methodist Hospital. It was still open at least through the late 1940's. I recall that Dr. Tuttle was our "family doctor" for many years until he specialized in surgery.

Does anyone know when the building was demolished or what is on the site now?

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57Tbird, you are right about the location - that was the old Methodist Hospital. It was still open at least through the late 1940's. I recall that Dr. Tuttle was our "family doctor" for many years until he specialized in surgery.

Does anyone know when the building was demolished or what is on the site now?

This raises a good question.

Is there any advice on how to locate family doctors from way back? We had a Dr Dave Kaminski for years here in Houston. He was well known and supposedly has a son or two in the same practice. Boy if I could interview Dr Kaminski he could sure tell much about the history of the city. His office was on Lyons Ave since late 1940's to about 1990's. :D

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  • The title was changed to Back To The 50's

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