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Current downtown houston population


tierwestah

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Does anyone have info on what the current downtown population is of Houston right now? I've been trying my best to google the information but I can't find any source that gives me a solid answer. Any info appreciated. Thanks

tier

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Only if there has been new residential open up since then. Has that been the case?

There haven't been any rental units come to market for a while, and if there's been any new supply at all, it would have to have been condos done on a small scale.

Marvy's project is under construction, and that'll add 346 new units. Assuming 95% occupancy and 1.5 persons per unit (probably reasonable since they're all one- and two-bedroom units), that'll be just shy of another 500 new downtown residents. Some of these may be corporate units for large accounting or law firms, and I think that leased occupancy on these may exceed what is physically occupied from week to week, though.

Although it is possible that Marvy's project could do exceptionally well, prove up rents on new residential highrises, and kick-start a wave of downtown apartments, I consider that scenario to be fairly unlikely. And since when Marvy acquired the land, the downtown office market has really taken off, causing land prices to soar in a way that eliminates a lot of residential sites from the consideration.

Edited by TheNiche
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Based on the fact that it's taken us 172 years to get 4,600 residents downtown, I predict it will be November of 2381 AD before we hit 10,000 downtown residents.

I imagine there used to be more than 4,600 residents at one time in those 172 years though... right? It's not like the population has been steadily rising for 172 years.

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I imagine there used to be more than 4,600 residents at one time in those 172 years though... right? It's not like the population has been steadily rising for 172 years.

Possibly not. As you go backwards in time and replace high-rise residencies with low-rise and even single family dwellings, the number would probably still decrease.

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Possibly not. As you go backwards in time and replace high-rise residencies with low-rise and even single family dwellings, the number would probably still decrease.

The modern day representation of downtown Houston (with freeways defining its boundaries) is most geographically equivalent in terms of gridded land area with that of small towns. Comparing like geographies at different stages of development offers insight as to what the population of a 19th century version of our conception of downtown Houston might've been. Note that all of these are county seats, just like Houston was.

Columbus, TX (3,926)

Downtown Houston, TX (aprox. 4,600)

La Grange, TX (4,645)

Hearne, TX (4,690)

Cameron, TX (5,855)

Navasota, TX (7,378)

In conclusion, I believe it entirely plausible that Houston's population exceeded today's levels at some point in history. Moreover, considering that average household size has declined precipitously in the 20th century, it is possible that downtown Houston would've eclipsed any of these towns, even surpassing the modern goal of 10,000 residents.

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Has to be. But most are CHUD. You'd never realize it.

Downtown is boring. I have consultants that spend weekends in downtown Houston. They like the city but can't stand downtown.

Nothing to do at all they say.

Edited by MidtownCoog
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The modern day representation of downtown Houston (with freeways defining its boundaries) is most geographically equivalent in terms of gridded land area with that of small towns. Comparing like geographies at different stages of development offers insight as to what the population of a 19th century version of our conception of downtown Houston might've been. Note that all of these are county seats, just like Houston was.

Columbus, TX (3,926)

Downtown Houston, TX (aprox. 4,600)

La Grange, TX (4,645)

Hearne, TX (4,690)

Cameron, TX (5,855)

Navasota, TX (7,378)

In conclusion, I believe it entirely plausible that Houston's population exceeded today's levels at some point in history. Moreover, considering that average household size has declined precipitously in the 20th century, it is possible that downtown Houston would've eclipsed any of these towns, even surpassing the modern goal of 10,000 residents.

I've spent time in most of those towns, and they all cover a much larger land area than our downtown alone does. Even towns like Flatonia (1,300) and Moulton (900) cover a larger gridded land area than our downtown.

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I've spent time in most of those towns, and they all cover a much larger land area than our downtown alone does. Even towns like Flatonia (1,300) and Moulton (900) cover a larger gridded land area than our downtown.

All the maps I linked to were shown in the same scale so as to make comparisons between downtown Houston and those towns easier to think about. And I did check city-data.com to ensure that city limits more or less conformed to the street grid.

True, there are smaller towns that have much lower density, but I would suspect that Houston was always more happening than Flatonia, even back in the day. I mean, we started out as the capitol of a nation, the seat of a county, and along a navigable body of water. Flatonia...Moulton...not so much.

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I also work with consultants and it really is tough to do anything downtown. Especially the east side. We rotate between the only 3-4 restaurants down there everyday for lunch or dinner. It gets old. They stay out in Uptown and like the area a lot.

Needless to say, I'm very excited for the Pavilions to open.

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Could never stand Uptown. People go there to drink, and then have to drive home.

Uptown's residential population is greater than downtown's, though. Home is closer. Uptown also has fewer one-way streets, which drunks seem to have more difficulty figuring out, and less confusing access in general.

I can't stand Uptown either, personally, but drunks aren't the reason why. Way the hell to pretentious and snob-ridden.

Edited by TheNiche
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I met up with a group of people who were in town for a convention a few weeks ago (staying at the Hyatt), and as the only Houstonian was kind of embarrassed with how little there was to do downtown on a Thursday evening within walking distance (most of the people were from Philly). Granted DG wasn't open yet. Houston Pavillions should really help DT's image and activity level, at least I hope so.

They wanted steak, so I suggested Strip House... walked them down Main St. a little ways, which they thought was cool. But the city seemed very dead.

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I wonder how many people live within a 5 mile radius of downtown...

These are the people who will go downtown to shop or use a park or go out to dinner most often, I think.

Yeah, that might be true. So maybe tons of housing around downtown isn't such a bad thing?

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not many do go downtown to shop, use a park or eat.

Yes, I said they will go downtown to use a park or eat [once there are more options]. I know many haven't gone downtown for those reasons in the past, but I would venture to guess that a majority of those using Disco Green on the weekends are coming from a 5 miles radius of downtown. And that's a good sign that they will also come downtown if there are actually things to do. That's why HP could be such a success. My point was that if there were shops downtown, those people living within a 5 mile radius would probably come downtown to shop.

I hate going to the Galleria. It's about twice the distance of Downtown, twice as crowded, the people are pretentious, and I rarely find a good deal, and I always have to drive. I'm often Downtown anyways, half the time without a car (Metro Rail). In the future if I am able to do some shopping downtown, that would be awesome. I hope HP and future similar developments will reduce my need to go Uptown. If only HP would have an Apple store...

Edited by Jax
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My point was that if there were shops downtown, those people living within a 5 mile radius would probably come downtown to shop.

That may be true but I think the number 1 problem with shops opening DT is competition. Houston is like a bunch of cities within the same one. Think about it, the village is full of shopping, eateries, and entertainment. Every where around DT is like that from lower Westheimer , River Oaks, along West Alabama, Hedwig Village etc... Even if there was more shopping DT, why would these people need to go DT to shop when their own hood has everything? I have also always thought that the Galleria area has killed DT shopping and will keep it minimal. Its a shame all of UT could have been built throughout midtown. Also the shops in the tunnels have killed street level shopping. I understand the reason for the tunnels (bad weather days and the three months of 95 degree and humidity weather) but maybe if those shops were along main street and there were entrances from in the buildings and the street like The Corner Bakery more retail would have opened next to the barber shops, nail places, food places etc.. that are all in the tunnels.

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I wonder how many people live within a 5 mile radius of downtown...

These are the people who will go downtown to shop or use a park or go out to dinner most often, I think.

Its not exactly what you want, but the 1st page of the promo flyer for the Sawyer Heights Target center has some 2008 demographics on it that certainly include downtown numbers...

http://www.propertycommerce.com/flyers/flyer44.pdf

EDIT: Also check out the last few pages...

Edited by tanith27
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That may be true but I think the number 1 problem with shops opening DT is competition. Houston is like a bunch of cities within the same one. Think about it, the village is full of shopping, eateries, and entertainment. Every where around DT is like that from lower Westheimer , River Oaks, along West Alabama, Hedwig Village etc... Even if there was more shopping DT, why would these people need to go DT to shop when their own hood has everything? I have also always thought that the Galleria area has killed DT shopping and will keep it minimal.

yep with the advent on the mall, downtown shopping has declined. having some unique stores/restaurants will sure help but a sizeable portion of the visitors to discovery green won't be able to afford some of these unique stores/restaurants. it's the double edged sword syndrome.

Edited by musicman
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Well there is still a Payless Shoe Store downtown across from the old Palis Royal (CVS).

see jax you do have shopping options downtown. i'll bet the people won't be pretentious and you CAN find a good deal. wow. thanks for the tip coog.

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yep with the advent on the mall, downtown shopping has declined

With the advent of the mall, downtown shopping has declined in some places (such as Houston), not all places. The fact that malls exist does not prove that downtown shopping can't make a comeback.

see jax you do have shopping options downtown [Payless Shoes]. i'll bet the people won't be pretentious and you CAN find a good deal. wow. thanks for the tip coog.

Good one Music Man, you got me there.

Houston is like a bunch of cities within the same one. Think about it, the village is full of shopping, eateries, and entertainment. Every where around DT is like that from lower Westheimer , River Oaks, along West Alabama, Hedwig Village etc... Even if there was more shopping DT, why would these people need to go DT to shop when their own hood has everything

The only shopping area I can think of that I can think will compete directly with Downtown in terms of proximity is Rice Village. But Rice Village is far enough away I think, and has poor access to transit compared to downtown. Also you'd get people shopping after work, during their lunch breaks, before going home, like they do in most other big cities. And you'd give the students from Rice, TMC, and UH more options than just Rice Village.

There's obviously some demand because they are building new retail as we speak. We just have to wait and see how well it works.

Edited by Jax
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yep with the advent on the mall, downtown shopping has declined. having some unique stores/restaurants will sure help but a sizeable portion of the visitors to discovery green won't be able to afford some of these unique stores/restaurants. it's the double edged sword syndrome.

I lived in San Francisco for a number of years, and downtown shopping is alive and well there. I think that the problem for DT here is that the destination shopping area in Houston is the Galleria, not DT. If you had the same stores DT, you would draw the people.

In my opinion, Houston is big enough to support major shopping in both DT and the Galleria if the stores are in place and the Pavilions project is a good start.

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I wonder how many people live within a 5 mile radius of downtown...

These are the people who will go downtown to shop or use a park or go out to dinner most often, I think.

How is Macy's doing? It is the only department store in the South that is in a CBD.

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I think that the problem for DT here is that the destination shopping area in Houston is the Galleria, not DT. If you had the same stores DT, you would draw the people.

i'm with ethanra one this one. there are many destination shopping areas in houston. competition is all over town. if the same stores were downtown, more people would still go to the galleria because more shopping money is in that area and access is easier....but we have to think realistically, all the stores at the galleria won't be opening downtown. downtown has to form its own niche to draw customers. once the customer base has increased then more businesses will consider a downtown location.

How is Macy's doing? It is the only department store in the South that is in a CBD.

its hrs are limited because customer base leaves after work.

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There's obviously some demand because they are building new retail as we speak. We just have to wait and see how well it works.

building retail and filling retail are two different things. we all know how much empty retail there is now. the pavilion developer is addressing the problem in the right way, by doing it as an entire package. not just a store at a time.

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Sometimes I wish we would just accept downtown for what it is: A place for business, business related activities and special events.

We are so focued on making downtown Houston look like other downtowns we can't see the forest for the trees.

Think how much there is to do a stone's throw from downtown.

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Why not let Downtown have some of the action then? Already started with Minute Maid Park, then Toyota Center, etc., etc. Downtown should have more to do. Let there be a financial district Downtown for business people to do their thing.

Edited by Trae
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Why not let Downtown have some of the action then? Already started with Minute Maid Park, then Toyota Center, etc., etc. Downtown should have more to do. Let there be a financial district Downtown for business people to do their thing.

A financial district is nice if it's attractive, but the only issue is that in NYC, Chicago, San fran..the financial districts are ghost towns after closing (around 5:30 EST)....Maybe you'll find MusicMan there after 6 trying to reclaim his..

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Sometimes I wish we would just accept downtown for what it is: A place for business, business related activities and special events.

We are so focued on making downtown Houston look like other downtowns we can't see the forest for the trees.

Think how much there is to do a stone's throw from downtown.

Gospel.

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Sometimes I wish we would just accept downtown for what it is: A place for business, business related activities and special events.

It's more fun to talk about future possibilities than to just be complacent with the way things are. Otherwise this forum would be awfully boring.

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Sometimes I wish we would just accept downtown for what it is: A place for business, business related activities and special events.

We are so focused on making downtown Houston look like other downtowns we can't see the forest for the trees.

Think how much there is to do a stone's throw from downtown.

Cheers ......

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Downtown Houston used to be a lot of fun at night. It was a perfect place to skate. We've given that up for what, more shopping? Feh. Shopping is boring. Skating down parking garages and playing hockey in the street are orders of magnitude more exciting.

And get off my lawn.

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