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davev1977

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I can't comment on your salary amount, however as a Canadian who grew up in Calgary I can comment on the cost of living difference. Even if you came down at 85K, you'll pay less tax, less for food and less for your much bigger home here than in Calgary. So dont necessarily think that you need to negotiate a higher salary to increase your standard of living.

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There is a definite shortage of Process Engineers throughout the industry as a whole. 100k minimum for your experience level, you shouldn't have a problem with the interview and obtaining at least a $50/hr rate.

I can't speak for the interview process, but I know of plenty of new grads that are getting $45 an hour.

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I'm wondering what the mood is like for those of you working in the oil industry now that Obama has been elected. Is the general consensus that not much will change, things will get worse (layoffs, etc.), or things will get better? How do you all view this situation?

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I'm wondering what the mood is like for those of you working in the oil industry now that Obama has been elected. Is the general consensus that not much will change, things will get worse (layoffs, etc.), or things will get better? How do you all view this situation?

There is a sense that the good old days of high oil and gasoline prices are gone, but there is still optimism..cautious one i should say. Obviously, most of them voted for McCain, but they realize that Obama would come in and not be so favorable to the oil companies. My co-workers are just waiting to see what happens.

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Thank you for the information, I'll explore each of those avenues. I just looked at El Paso's website and was very impressed. They seem to offer everything I'm looking for and I was getting excited by the prospect. I certainly need to learn the software as quickly as possible, but I'm ready, willing, and able. Almost more than anything, working as part of a team appeals to me. Right now I work largely on my own as I'm responsible for overseeing our exploratory drilling and geological data management, drawing maps and cross-sections, etc. I do collaborate with our engineers, but I'm the only geologist for our Kentucky subsidiaries. I enjoy my job and the independence is good and all, but it would also be fun to be a part of some larger projects with several other geoscientists working together to solve problems and such.

Actualy yes It happened in my family waaay before my wife and I met . See her dad was a geoligist for Shell oil. He was a Venuezuelian citizen. The government then sent him to University of Texas to further his credentials . Eventually his family was transfered to Houston where he worked with "Tar-Sands and other rock formations in the search for oil. He eventually retired from Shell after spending some fourty years there . By the way in the late sixties I took the Shell Dealer training school to become a service station operator . It was an invaluable experence , wouldn't trade what I learned for anything too.

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I'm wondering what the mood is like for those of you working in the oil industry now that Obama has been elected. Is the general consensus that not much will change, things will get worse (layoffs, etc.), or things will get better? How do you all view this situation?

Short term, bad. Long term, uncertain.

It seems a lot like global demand could potentially offset stagnant demand in the U.S., but that won't be for at least the next several years IMO.

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I'm wondering what the mood is like for those of you working in the oil industry now that Obama has been elected. Is the general consensus that not much will change, things will get worse (layoffs, etc.), or things will get better? How do you all view this situation?

Obama is no real threat to the Oil Industry from where I dwell. He's already doing a 180 from all the election rhetoric. A Lot of people are on a wait and see what he does mode. A lot of this "Change" that was the entire theme of his run at the White House, is now taking shape as the Clinton Administration less Bill Clinton. 36 of his current 41 appointments are former Clintonites. So it is still yet to be seen where things are headed. One thing I think he will find out or is finding out, is pulling out of Iraq pre-maturely will be crushing to our economy, because OPEC will shut the valves on us, and run the cost of Oil up higher than we've ever seen. The Saudi Royal Family, is waiting to see what direction he takes, because believe me when I tell you, pulling out of Iraq early and leaving behind a vacuum to be filled by Iran, would be disastrous to the region. All this talk of the US becoming Energy Independent is a pipe dream, and anyone who bought that line, really needs to get a clue. We are far too over indulgent to ever be fully independent. I mean look at the hypocrisy behind Mr. Green Jeans Al Gore. He achieved what he was after. He vindicated his failed attempt at a Presidency, by Buying a Pulitzer Prize, Sold a few million books, and has been the self appointed Green god of salvation, and by some bazaar method, been atoned the utmost authority on Global Warming. All the time flying Coast to Coast and World Wide in his not so Environmentally Friendly G5, arriving in Limos, not Hybrids, and is still a huge stockholder in Oxy, a far from Environmentally friendly, oil company.

This Banking fiasco has dealt a blow to a large part of the industry. About 80% of the upstream industry deals in credit and investors. The days of the Wildcatter that invests his own money on an idea or dream, are long gone. These days there are few cash and carry companies, that have the liquidity to operate on cash. Most ventures are on one of two things, short terms loans and investors. A lot of the time these investors are individuals that are investing money that is borrowed against other investments, most of these are short term loans also. Right now things are in limbo waiting on the bounce. AFE's (Authorization for Expenditure) are being put on hold, either waiting on money or unable to get it under the current financial conditions. Banks are really watching the paper right now. About 50% of the paper is out of the Market right now, waiting on stability. People have cashed out during the panic and slow to get back in, very understandable. It's going to take some time to get volumes up in the Market, and it's also going to take time for the banks to recover their faith in lending.

For those that are curious what I am talking about, in describing these AFE's. Here's a basic scenario. Widget Exploration finds available lease land, they get their Landman to do the ground work, they have their geologists put together the potential reserves available on said leases. The Drilling Engineers put together a drilling prognosis and cost to get at these reserves. The production Engineers do the same for getting it from the well-site to the sales pipeline. Then the bean counters put together the potential financial gains there, after drilling and production work. The Upstream VP for Widget Exploration, puts on his best suit and tie, meets with the board and sells them on the idea. This board is usually made up of members that hold purse strings with capital sources. Sometimes they just bring in the bankers, if they are going at it alone, asked for say 20 billion on a 4 year note, (This time varies based on the size of the field or prospect), show them the numbers, they say yeah or nay. If it's approved, then the Upstream VP is budgeted the money, His Superintendents put together AFE's for each individual well, they are signed off on by the VP, and it's off to the races.

If Widget is doing this off of investors, they romance them and sell them on the deal and the money is approved, and as I said before some of these investors are investing on the short term notes on other investment, stock holdings, and sometimes properties, or whatever. Whatever the case most of all of this involves banks and lending, all of which is at a virtual standstill right now, except in the best case, low risk scenarios. Oil ventures are always risky to some extent or in some way, so money has dried up some. Of course there is a lot of stuff still ongoing because this money has long since been approved, and is in the works, so right now there is just a few ripples on the pond. But the longer this crisis drags out the bigger the ripple gets. If we see this thing resolve in the next couple of years, the ripple will have very little domestic effect.

In one case it will be a blessing, because we can get some house cleaning done, and get rid of some dead weight. What I mean by this, with the off the chart prices that have been around for the past few years, every Tom Dick and Harry has tried to get in on the boom, and there is a lot of dead weight out there, and short timers that jumped on the band wagon to make a quick buck. We can weed all that riff raff out and get the industry back on a more solid standard. This is something I will welcome with open arms, as will any oil person that's worth their sand and has spent any years in this business. Also on the other end, their is a lot of dead weight of hangers on that are way past their prime, and have managed to hang on much longer than they should have been allowed to. The are mostly old and outdated, but are still in play because people have been so desperate to get anyone experienced in place. So a bunch of these old washed up hands, dusted off their old outdated resumes, and got back in the game, that they were banished from back in the late 80's and early 90's, when the out lived their usefulness. So this could be some long need house cleaning.

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Obama is no real threat to the Oil Industry from where I dwell. He's already doing a 180 from all the election rhetoric. A Lot of people are on a wait and see what he does mode. A lot of this "Change" that was the entire theme of his run at the White House, is now taking shape as the Clinton Administration less Bill Clinton. 36 of his current 41 appointments are former Clintonites. So it is still yet to be seen where things are headed. One thing I think he will find out or is finding out, is pulling out of Iraq pre-maturely will be crushing to our economy, because OPEC will shut the valves on us, and run the cost of Oil up higher than we've ever seen. The Saudi Royal Family, is waiting to see what direction he takes, because believe me when I tell you, pulling out of Iraq early and leaving behind a vacuum to be filled by Iran, would be disastrous to the region. All this talk of the US becoming Energy Independent is a pipe dream, and anyone who bought that line, really needs to get a clue. We are far too over indulgent to ever be fully independent. I mean look at the hypocrisy behind Mr. Green Jeans Al Gore. He achieved what he was after. He vindicated his failed attempt at a Presidency, by Buying a Pulitzer Prize, Sold a few million books, and has been the self appointed Green god of salvation, and by some bazaar method, been atoned the utmost authority on Global Warming. All the time flying Coast to Coast and World Wide in his not so Environmentally Friendly G5, arriving in Limos, not Hybrids, and is still a huge stockholder in Oxy, a far from Environmentally friendly, oil company.

This Banking fiasco has dealt a blow to a large part of the industry. About 80% of the upstream industry deals in credit and investors. The days of the Wildcatter that invests his own money on an idea or dream, are long gone. These days there are few cash and carry companies, that have the liquidity to operate on cash. Most ventures are on one of two things, short terms loans and investors. A lot of the time these investors are individuals that are investing money that is borrowed against other investments, most of these are short term loans also. Right now things are in limbo waiting on the bounce. AFE's (Authorization for Expenditure) are being put on hold, either waiting on money or unable to get it under the current financial conditions. Banks are really watching the paper right now. About 50% of the paper is out of the Market right now, waiting on stability. People have cashed out during the panic and slow to get back in, very understandable. It's going to take some time to get volumes up in the Market, and it's also going to take time for the banks to recover their faith in lending.

For those that are curious what I am talking about, in describing these AFE's. Here's a basic scenario. Widget Exploration finds available lease land, they get their Landman to do the ground work, they have their geologists put together the potential reserves available on said leases. The Drilling Engineers put together a drilling prognosis and cost to get at these reserves. The production Engineers do the same for getting it from the well-site to the sales pipeline. Then the bean counters put together the potential financial gains there, after drilling and production work. The Upstream VP for Widget Exploration, puts on his best suit and tie, meets with the board and sells them on the idea. This board is usually made up of members that hold purse strings with capital sources. Sometimes they just bring in the bankers, if they are going at it alone, asked for say 20 billion on a 4 year note, (This time varies based on the size of the field or prospect), show them the numbers, they say yeah or nay. If it's approved, then the Upstream VP is budgeted the money, His Superintendents put together AFE's for each individual well, they are signed off on by the VP, and it's off to the races.

If Widget is doing this off of investors, they romance them and sell them on the deal and the money is approved, and as I said before some of these investors are investing on the short term notes on other investment, stock holdings, and sometimes properties, or whatever. Whatever the case most of all of this involves banks and lending, all of which is at a virtual standstill right now, except in the best case, low risk scenarios. Oil ventures are always risky to some extent or in some way, so money has dried up some. Of course there is a lot of stuff still ongoing because this money has long since been approved, and is in the works, so right now there is just a few ripples on the pond. But the longer this crisis drags out the bigger the ripple gets. If we see this thing resolve in the next couple of years, the ripple will have very little domestic effect.

In one case it will be a blessing, because we can get some house cleaning done, and get rid of some dead weight. What I mean by this, with the off the chart prices that have been around for the past few years, every Tom Dick and Harry has tried to get in on the boom, and there is a lot of dead weight out there, and short timers that jumped on the band wagon to make a quick buck. We can weed all that riff raff out and get the industry back on a more solid standard. This is something I will welcome with open arms, as will any oil person that's worth their sand and has spent any years in this business. Also on the other end, their is a lot of dead weight of hangers on that are way past their prime, and have managed to hang on much longer than they should have been allowed to. The are mostly old and outdated, but are still in play because people have been so desperate to get anyone experienced in place. So a bunch of these old washed up hands, dusted off their old outdated resumes, and got back in the game, that they were banished from back in the late 80's and early 90's, when the out lived their usefulness. So this could be some long need house cleaning.

Mark , uh I like whar ya commin from der Brutha, I like it when somebody like yerself can give a statement like you did . Yep sound like ya got yer act together there too. I think you need to go see if K P R C if they're still News talk will alow you on as guest commentator . If no one else says it , well let me thank you here . Thank you for the story, uh post . Ed Shaver, scrubba

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I'm getting closer to the time when I begin applying for a job with an oil company and I'm wondering what the situation is for new hires in the industry while oil prices are so much lower than the average over the last couple of years. Any thoughts?

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I'm getting closer to the time when I begin applying for a job with an oil company and I'm wondering what the situation is for new hires in the industry while oil prices are so much lower than the average over the last couple of years. Any thoughts?

I would just say good luck. A lot of people I know in the industry began looking for new work as their projects dried up, only to find that companies were hiring at much lower wages, or not hiring at all. I think over the next year the industry is going to suffer, but hopefully in 18 months we'll see banks lending money again so companies can begin new projects. All my company will likely see for the next 2-3 years will be updating/repairing old stations, and no brand new projects. I suspect it will be the same all over. A friend at Mustang told me prior to the holidays that even they had lost a big project and were looking at some significant layoffs.

As far as the effect on the industry with Obama in office, I really don't see one. The big (huge) boys will get taxed a bit more maybe, but that's it. The world still needs oil/natural gas, and even with the transfer to renewable energy oil won't be going anywhere anytime soon. I'm more worried about the state of the industry 15-20 years from now when I'm working hard to retire early.

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Okay, so I'm looking at four companies and comparing them to each other, trying to figure out which would be the best to work for as a newcomer to the industry. Two are majors and two are mid-majors I think. The four I've identified so far are (in no particular order): Devon Energy, El Paso Corporation, Shell, and Exxon. Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these?

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Okay, so I'm looking at four companies and comparing them to each other, trying to figure out which would be the best to work for as a newcomer to the industry. Two are majors and two are mid-majors I think. The four I've identified so far are (in no particular order): Devon Energy, El Paso Corporation, Shell, and Exxon. Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these?

I don't work for Exxon but I work with Exxon employees all the time. They seem to be the most professional of all the oil companies I've worked with. Most of them are extremely bright. I wouldn't hesitate to take a job with them. ExxonMobil is probably more stable than the U.S. government at the moment.

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Okay, so I'm looking at four companies and comparing them to each other, trying to figure out which would be the best to work for as a newcomer to the industry. Two are majors and two are mid-majors I think. The four I've identified so far are (in no particular order): Devon Energy, El Paso Corporation, Shell, and Exxon. Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these?

You being a geologist you really can't go wrong with Exxon, Shell or El Paso. I would pass on Devon, because of some serious financial issues they are having currently, and sometimes it seems they make moves like their decision making process involves a Ouija board. At Exxon you would be working for a personal friend named Mike Zimmerman, really a nice guy, great rock man and very low keyed. He's been with Exxon for close to 30 years lives near me over on Lake Conroe. If you take a job at El Paso, you would be working for Rene Decou, (Pronounced Renny Day-Coo), and you could not work for a finer man on earth, I've know Rene for about 30 years. He is one of they best Rock guys I have ever had the pleasure to work with. Now when it comes to bells and whistles, in the rock department, Shell is it hands down. They have all the cool toys, Virtual Geo 4D, Virtual Source Monitoring, and many multi axis visual aids, Some very sharp people to work with, Jorge Lopez, Albena Mateeva, Audrey Bakulin and Rodney Calvert are some of the best out there, and a low key atmosphere to work in. They also are big on continued education and push for you to keep going in school. Weigh out your offers and pick your flavor.

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Okay, so I'm looking at four companies and comparing them to each other, trying to figure out which would be the best to work for as a newcomer to the industry. Two are majors and two are mid-majors I think. The four I've identified so far are (in no particular order): Devon Energy, El Paso Corporation, Shell, and Exxon. Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these?

I worked for ExxonMobil for 37 years and recently retired from there. Not a geologist but in my view Exxon is very strong financially (top 5 globally) and has great people. Good benefits too designed for long term career employees. They work you hard, push you hard and the people there are bright and controlling, so it has its stress but well worth it. What job doesnt have stress these days, ExxonMobil stress is just about hitting high expectations not is the firm going to make it.

Let me know if you would like to know more. One added plus for Exxon, they can move you to a number of areas. I am a Chem Engineer undergrad but had a career ranging from IT, engineering, financial to real estate. That was a huge plus for me to see different areas without changing firms.

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Let me make sure I understand your question:

You are asking which company to APPLY to?

Or have you received offers from these four companies and want to know which offer to accept?

If it is the first, I would recommend all of them (and every other one you can imagine)

If it is the latter, you are a very lucky man. I worked for Exxon right out of school (many years ago) and would agree with the assessments above. They are a great company. But so are Devon and Shell.

Th CEO of El Paso is a great guy, and those things tend to flow downward.

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i'm a process engineer but lately haven't had any luck with the EPC's or other oil companies..seems like everyone is on a hiring freeze these days due to the price of oil...anyone in the industry have any thoughts? Have there been a lot of layoffs?

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i'm a process engineer but lately haven't had any luck with the EPC's or other oil companies..seems like everyone is on a hiring freeze these days due to the price of oil...anyone in the industry have any thoughts? Have there been a lot of layoffs?

Yes there have been layoffs and I'm sorry to have to say that it's not going to get better anytime soon. It's going to get worse.

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Let me make sure I understand your question:

You are asking which company to APPLY to?

Or have you received offers from these four companies and want to know which offer to accept?

If it is the first, I would recommend all of them (and every other one you can imagine)

If it is the latter, you are a very lucky man. I worked for Exxon right out of school (many years ago) and would agree with the assessments above. They are a great company. But so are Devon and Shell.

Th CEO of El Paso is a great guy, and those things tend to flow downward.

Sorry it took me awhile to get back on here. I'm just considering which to apply to. I understand it's not the best time, the economy being as it is. But perhaps by next spring things will be looking up. And that's when I hope to get my foot in the door. In the meantime, I'll be sharpening my skills and tailoring my resume!

You being a geologist you really can't go wrong with Exxon, Shell or El Paso. I would pass on Devon, because of some serious financial issues they are having currently, and sometimes it seems they make moves like their decision making process involves a Ouija board. At Exxon you would be working for a personal friend named Mike Zimmerman, really a nice guy, great rock man and very low keyed. He's been with Exxon for close to 30 years lives near me over on Lake Conroe. If you take a job at El Paso, you would be working for Rene Decou, (Pronounced Renny Day-Coo), and you could not work for a finer man on earth, I've know Rene for about 30 years. He is one of they best Rock guys I have ever had the pleasure to work with. Now when it comes to bells and whistles, in the rock department, Shell is it hands down. They have all the cool toys, Virtual Geo 4D, Virtual Source Monitoring, and many multi axis visual aids, Some very sharp people to work with, Jorge Lopez, Albena Mateeva, Audrey Bakulin and Rodney Calvert are some of the best out there, and a low key atmosphere to work in. They also are big on continued education and push for you to keep going in school. Weigh out your offers and pick your flavor.

Mr. Barnes, you have given me plenty of good advice in this thread. I really appreciate that! I hope one day to make the acquaintance of any or all of the gentlemen you've mentioned at each of these companies. I would be thrilled to work for any one of them.

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For those with a degree in Finance. The specific oil company I was in needs you. This trend started a few years ago that I read and heard of. Finance. :D

That's how I got into the oil/gas industry. Received my BBA in finance, worked in commercial banking and found my way in the industry. Currently I'm a trader, but started in the finance group/treasury dept. of a growing company (back in the mid '90's).

Edited by Bombero451

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When i worked at Exxon, i heard many good things from the engineers and geologists. They do work hard, but get paid handsomely!! Stressful, but worth it. Unfortunately, i worked in the IT area and my experience was not positive. I was a contractor which made it worse, but even some of the employees didn't really like the atmosphere and culture in UTEC(believe their name has changed) at the time.

Edited by sifuwong

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Okay, so I'm looking at four companies and comparing them to each other, trying to figure out which would be the best to work for as a newcomer to the industry. Two are majors and two are mid-majors I think. The four I've identified so far are (in no particular order): Devon Energy, El Paso Corporation, Shell, and Exxon. Does anyone have any thoughts on any of these?

You should apply at Chevron. Great environment! Quite a few Engineers that i knew at Exxon went over to Chevron. They like it much better!

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You should apply at Chevron. Great environment! Quite a few Engineers that i knew at Exxon went over to Chevron. They like it much better!

I've read up on Chevron, now, and really like what I see. Any fans of BP out there?

Edited by davev1977

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Get out there and apply!!! You can worry about which company is best when you get multiple job offers! ^_^

For the record I know several PhD geologists who came to Houston to work for Big Oil. Most are with Shell, and the advice that Mark Barnes gave about Shell pushing for continued education is right on. It seems like a more "academic" style environment there. The Exxon guys are well-paid, but seem more stressed. Just what I've observed.

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We're going to visit Houston on the weekend before Thanksgiving, then take a five-day cruise from Galveston to Cozumel! We're very excited. While visting Houston we're going to drive out to Sugar Land and The Woodlands, as well as downtown, and get a feel for what each place is like and where we would like to live. We'll test drive the commutes to downtown while we're at it...

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I am glad that Houston can still attract good talent. Bringing in more professionals for the oil industry is

a very good thing for Houston.

You mentioned that you wanted to live in the suburbs, maybe Sugarland. If you cannot find what you

are looking for immediately, there are some really nice downtown luxury apartments that can help with the

transition or become your lifestyle. For full disclosure, I work with one of them, but there are several other new downtown

apartments in the area that you may want to check out. All of these are brand new and offer MANY amenities

and may just be a good alternative while you try and find the perfect suburban home.

This property is on the METRORail

http://www.venuemuse...t.com/index.php

This is very fine living and has features uncommon for apartments.

http://www.thebellemeade.com/index.php

As for a single-family home, Caceres is close to downtown and is gated community.

http://www.caceresliving.com/index.php

And this one is just high-end living at its finest. You have to check out the photos.

http://www.bammelpar...s.com/index.php

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We're going to visit Houston on the weekend before Thanksgiving, then take a five-day cruise from Galveston to Cozumel! We're very excited. While visting Houston we're going to drive out to Sugar Land and The Woodlands, as well as downtown, and get a feel for what each place is like and where we would like to live. We'll test drive the commutes to downtown while we're at it...

In addition to the November trip, I've added an October trip to attend the SEG meeting in Houston. While I'm there, I will visit the career placement center to meet representatives from multiple companies in hopes of landing a career with one of them. Exxon and Chevron will both be there (my top two), as well as Hess, BP, and Total. I have my resume and business cards, suit and tie, and I'm ready to do this!

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