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Texas Ranks #1 in number of Fortunte 500 companies!


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according to the latest article on Chron.com, Texas has beat New York State for the number of Fortune 500 companies in a particular state with 58 as opposed to New York's 57.

For those that are curious and/or keeping count, Houston has 26, which increased from last year's 23.

yay. Take that You Damned Yankees. :)

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according to the latest article on Chron.com, Texas has beat New York State for the number of Fortune 500 companies in a particular state with 58 as opposed to New York's 57.

For those that are curious and/or keeping count, Houston has 26, which increased from last year's 23.

yay. Take that You Damned Yankees. :)

One of our neighbors got put on the board of one of those companies last fall. Yesterday they moved out of the ghetto and into their 3.5 million dollars River Oaks house.

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Something i overheard on cnbc yesterday morning while getting ready for work... apparently we overtook new york for the no. 1 spot. pretty amazing, imo.

Texas - 58

NY - 55

CA - 52

with Houston home an amazing 26 of those :blink:

pretty cool stuff.

Edited by swtsig
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This is great news. Wasn't Dallas trying to say that the entire DFW area had more fortune 500 companys than the Houston area at one point? I'm confused.

I think that was the "number of millionaires/billionaires" thread.

I am happy to announce that I contribute to Houston's high percentage of multi-thousandaires.

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This is great news. Wasn't Dallas trying to say that the entire DFW area had more fortune 500 companys than the Houston area at one point? I'm confused.

Actually, that was me as of last year. Comparing metro areas, the Dallas/FW area had more HQs than Houston, but we were about on par with one another in terms of population per HQ.

It wasn't much of a big deal except that the Greater Houston Partnership was using the City of Houston's HQ count and saying that Houston had more HQs than any other city in the nation except New York. That was disingenuous because city limits don't really matter in an economic sense.

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One has to stop and ask "why Texas"? Becuase in Texas, anything goes. Jobs over all else no matter what the cost.

No, it has a lot more to do with border towns weighing down our averages. Our border towns could give run-of-the-mill Louisiana a run for its money.

I know this because I've lived there.

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As a native and former resident of Louisiana, I can tell you that Texas is at the very least No. 49 in education and health care.

I second that, having grown up in LA, 22 years there. Don't know about the border towns here, but small town LA can be downright scary.

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Texans living in urban areas are less likely than the average U.S. citizen to have health insurance. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, almost one in six Americans is uninsured; in Texas, the ratio is one in four. While there is substantial variation among Texas cities, every major city has an uninsured rate higher than the national average.

http://cpa.state.tx.us/specialrpt/uninsured05/

Texas is #49 in verbal SAT scores in the nation (493) and #46 in average math SAT scores (502).

Texas is #36 in the nation in high school graduation rates (68%).

Texas is #33 in the nation in teacher salaries. Teacher salaries in Texas are not keeping pace with the national average. The gains realized from the last state-funded across-the-board pay raise authorized in 1999, which moved the ranking from 33 to as high as 26th in the nation, have disappeared over the last five years.

Texas was the only state in the nation to cut average per pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2005, resulting in a ranking of #40 nationally; down from #25 in fiscal year 1999.

Texas is #6 in the nation in student growth. The general student population in Texas public schools grew by 11.1% between school years 1999 and 2005, with the largest percent of growth seen among low income and minority children.

Between school years 1999 and 2005, the number of central administrators employed by Texas public schools grew by 32.5%, overall staffing in public schools grew by 15.6%, while the number of teachers grew only 13.3%.

http://www.window.state.tx.us/comptrol/wwstand/wws0512ed/

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Texans living in urban areas are less likely than the average U.S. citizen to have health insurance. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, almost one in six Americans is uninsured; in Texas, the ratio is one in four. While there is substantial variation among Texas cities, every major city has an uninsured rate higher than the national average.

Its not that I'm denying any of the stats you provided (although I might take issue with their validity in some cases), but where are we #50, like you claimed?

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Boy, you sure won that argument. Good job. We really aren't 50th....only 49th and 46th.

Hmm, I saw a #33 and a #40 as well. Neither in the same ballpark as 50. Coog mentioned, specifically, that we're #50 in "so many other areas." That stat was challenged, no big deal. Haifers challenge each others facts all the time.

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Texas is #49 in verbal SAT scores in the nation (493) and #46 in average math SAT scores (502).

Texas is #36 in the nation in high school graduation rates (68%).

Texas is #33 in the nation in teacher salaries. Teacher salaries in Texas are not keeping pace with the national average. The gains realized from the last state-funded across-the-board pay raise authorized in 1999, which moved the ranking from 33 to as high as 26th in the nation, have disappeared over the last five years.

Texas was the only state in the nation to cut average per pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2005, resulting in a ranking of #40 nationally; down from #25 in fiscal year 1999.

Texas is #6 in the nation in student growth. The general student population in Texas public schools grew by 11.1% between school years 1999 and 2005, with the largest percent of growth seen among low income and minority children.

Between school years 1999 and 2005, the number of central administrators employed by Texas public schools grew by 32.5%, overall staffing in public schools grew by 15.6%, while the number of teachers grew only 13.3%.

All good reasons to get the government out of the education business.

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Not to sound like some wishy washy lib but we should expect better.

Wishy washy libs? Frankly all these posts suggesting that 33rd, 40th, 46th and 49th out of 50 isn't so bad....at least we're not 50th!....sounds awfully libbish to me. Aren't conservatives the ones that claim to demand accountability? No wonder everyone is calling Obama elitist. He got a degree.

***For all of those who learned math in Texas, all of those rankings are in the BOTTOM THIRD of states. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

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By Libber I don't mean to suggest we take money from the Fortune 500. That's what Barry Obama wants to do.

But with all this prosperity you would think this state could get it together.

We can't even build roads.

So we could have all the 500s and it wouldn't mean much.

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