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Camden Travis

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So, by the statement below, can we assume that Camden Travis is a joint venture?

"Furthermore, Camden has brought construction starts to a halt. "Many markets entered the recession in late 2006, early 2007," Campo remarked. "We slowed the development pipeline long before many of our peers. We haven't started a wholly owned development since mid-2007, most of the ones after that are through joint ventures." Furthermore, no new construction projects will be launched until market conditions improve, he added."

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Took this at a traffic light:

img0488z.jpg

Edited by Jax

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I think it's boring and too short. But at least it's taking up blocks.

The rendering's colors don't match and look unpleasing. However, infill is infill, I'll take what I can get.

Don't we all dream of the day the Red Line gets dense from Midtown to the Museum District?

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The rendering's colors don't match and look unpleasing. However, infill is infill, I'll take what I can get.

Don't we all dream of the day the Red Line gets dense from Midtown to the Museum District?

I'm going to hold off my opinion on this since all we've seen is a little thumbnail rendering of it.

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I'm going to hold off my opinion on this since all we've seen is a little thumbnail rendering of it.

I was judging the Rendering...

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I live up the road from Camden Travis and was out with the camera and took a pic to give y'all kind of an update.

post-8123-1241572896_thumb.jpg

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too bad they're cheaply built.

Ya... pretty lame development IMO. Not sure if "anything IS better than nothing" in this case. Woulda be nice to see a project similar to the Venue development in the Museum District, built in this spot.

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It's hot here, and "no one" walks anywhere (except crazy people who like hotness).

In the form that most of Houston is in now it would be to hot and to hard to walk. But if it was more urban, with tree lined streets for shade and other features that will cool you off, it can be walkable. You all give up to easily on what Houston is capable of being.

A few years ago I was riding around Houston, it was hot as hell, but once we got to Sugarland Town Center/Mall it was much cooler. I wondered why and noticed all of the shade from the trees in the area.

There is also this new kind of pavement that is not only easy on your feet, but it absorbs water and does not get hot like regular pavements. So there are things that can be done to reduce heat in areas and make that area walkable.

Look at the Houston Premium Outlets, its an outdoor mall and people still go.

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too bad they're cheaply built.

The amusing part is that this complex's rents will probably be the high end of the Midtown apartment market, which is already ridiculously overpriced anyways.

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The amusing part is that this complex's rents will probably be the high end of the Midtown apartment market, which is already ridiculously overpriced anyways.

no doubt but the yuppies like em. with the post midtown and the former amli having more water leakage issues, guess not leaking yet will be an amenity

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Ya... pretty lame development IMO. Not sure if "anything IS better than nothing" in this case. Woulda be nice to see a project similar to the Venue development in the Museum District, built in this spot.

My hunch is that Camden is saving $$$ for the superblock across the street and that this development is just a stepping stone.

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My hunch is that Camden is saving $$$ for the superblock across the street and that this development is just a stepping stone.

If true, not a bad strategy.

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I wonder if all of those powerlines and tall light poles will be removed when this is finished?

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Should begin leasing soon as banners have been placed on exterior with phone number for leasing info....mid October move in? Can't wait!!

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The project's turned out nicely, IMO. I realize there was some consternation over the lack of retail included (or the complete absence of it) but given the retail opportunities near by, I don't think it's a big deal. If anyone would ever develop the superblock, that would be one of the more desired areas of Midtown, especially when you consider the proximity to the McGowen rail stop.

Edited by The Great Hizzy!

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The project's turned out nicely, IMO. I realize there was some consternation over the lack of retail included (or the complete absence of it) but given the retail opportunities near by, I don't think it's a big deal. If anyone would ever develop the superblock, that would be one of the more desired areas of Midtown, especially when you consider the proximity to the McGowen rail stop.

I could care less about retail right now and am excited to see this thing almost finished. If it gets leased out, my guess is that the retail will follow soon next door, across the street, and at the Mix. Also, remember that Camden owns part of the super block.

BTW, does anyone know if this place has a pool?

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Say what you will about the Post Midtown development being tacky, but it at least feels livable, lively. The Camden developments are downright depressing.

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Whats up with this funky new architectural style that has weird cornices protruding at ridiculous amounts from the top of the buildings? I started seeing this trend in Austin a while back, then San Antonio, and now its spread to about every American city. Its ugly as all get out but whatever, if it brings more people into downtown than its better than nothing I guess. I did go up on top of these apartments a few months ago after all the contruction workers left and went on top of the roof and it has a badass view of downtown though from up there.

Edited by photolitherland
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all these apartments going up in Midtown makes me nervous...hopefully the area doesn't turn into what Gulton is today 20 years from now.

Edited by CHiPs

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all these apartments going up in Midtown makes me nervous...hopefully the area doesn't turn into what Gulton is today 20 years from now.

Well hopefully Midtown's proximity to DT, Museum District, and TMC will save it from becoming a haven for low income apartments like Gulfton.

I like (being sarcastic here) how the power lines end when they reach Camden's property and immediately start up again when the property ends, as seen by the first pic fatesdisastr posted.

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Well hopefully Midtown's proximity to DT, Museum District, and TMC will save it from becoming a haven for low income apartments like Gulfton.

Midtown's proximity to downtown, Museum District etc. didn't keep it from being a virtual ghost town for decades. I've thought for a long time that the high concentration of apartments in Midtown puts the area very much at risk for being a future Gulfton.

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Midtown's proximity to downtown, Museum District etc. didn't keep it from being a virtual ghost town for decades. I've thought for a long time that the high concentration of apartments in Midtown puts the area very much at risk for being a future Gulfton.

In fact, 30 years ago, Midtown was Gulfton and Gulfton was Midtown. Gulfton was where the young, hip, and trendy professionals lived and partied, just as Midtown is today. The real estate crash of 1986 slayed that beast, and present day Gulfton rose from the carcas. Just as the Boomtown days helped fill Gulfton's apartments, the bubble of the last 10 years built Midtown. The only thing missing (so far) is the real estate crash.

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In fact, 30 years ago, Midtown was Gulfton and Gulfton was Midtown. Gulfton was where the young, hip, and trendy professionals lived and partied, just as Midtown is today. The real estate crash of 1986 slayed that beast, and present day Gulfton rose from the carcas. Just as the Boomtown days helped fill Gulfton's apartments, the bubble of the last 10 years built Midtown. The only thing missing (so far) is the real estate crash.

Very true, most of SW was booming and was a place for hip, young professionals. However, I think Midtown is better positioned, in terms of location, in 2009 which well help it maintain some of its desirability.

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Yeah, Midtown's proximity to Houston's cultural center (Downtown, Museum District, Medical Center, Montrose, Rice University area, etc) give it a big advantage over Gulfton in my opinion. I rarely go out to the Gulfton area but I see myself spending most of my time in close proximity to Midtown if I stay in Houston long term... unless all of the museums, educational institutions and major companies disappear from the area.

I guess Gulfton has the advantage of being not too far from a huge shopping mall, but I still think Midtown is a better location.

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But again, if it were simply a matter of location then why was Midtown (and Fourth Ward) so awful for so many years?

If anything I would be willing to bet that the long-term prognosis for Midtown is dire at best. The quality of many of the apartment blocks is poor, and once they start showing their age all those people who want to be close to the Museum District etc will turn tail and run. At that point the owners won't have much choice but to lower rents, and the downward spiral starts. The problem is compounded by the sheer number of rental units in a relatively small area, along with a lack of a stable residential base throughout much of the neighborhood, and a concentration of social service agencies and persistent problems with prostitution and drugs in the rest.

It's too bad, because if the city had been able to engage in any more comprehensive a planning process than granting a TIRZ and putting up clever new street signs, then things might have been different.

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But again, if it were simply a matter of location then why was Midtown (and Fourth Ward) so awful for so many years?

If anything I would be willing to bet that the long-term prognosis for Midtown is dire at best. The quality of many of the apartment blocks is poor, and once they start showing their age all those people who want to be close to the Museum District etc will turn tail and run. At that point the owners won't have much choice but to lower rents, and the downward spiral starts. The problem is compounded by the sheer number of rental units in a relatively small area, along with a lack of a stable residential base throughout much of the neighborhood, and a concentration of social service agencies and persistent problems with prostitution and drugs in the rest.

It's too bad, because if the city had been able to engage in any more comprehensive a planning process than granting a TIRZ and putting up clever new street signs, then things might have been different.

I would have to disagree.

During the 80's, we had an extremely high crime rate that occured with the oil bust as well as land values out in the burbs were dropping like a stone and quite a bit of "White flight" was happening at the same time.

Unless we have a perfect storm like that again, I don't see it happening; particularly with the projected population by 2025.

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But again, if it were simply a matter of location then why was Midtown (and Fourth Ward) so awful for so many years?

If anything I would be willing to bet that the long-term prognosis for Midtown is dire at best. The quality of many of the apartment blocks is poor, and once they start showing their age all those people who want to be close to the Museum District etc will turn tail and run. At that point the owners won't have much choice but to lower rents, and the downward spiral starts. The problem is compounded by the sheer number of rental units in a relatively small area, along with a lack of a stable residential base throughout much of the neighborhood, and a concentration of social service agencies and persistent problems with prostitution and drugs in the rest.

It's too bad, because if the city had been able to engage in any more comprehensive a planning process than granting a TIRZ and putting up clever new street signs, then things might have been different.

It isn't simply a matter of location, there are many socioeconomic factors involved as well that Ricco67 touched upon. I don't think that Midtown is going to continue to be a "young hip area" indefinitely, but it can establish itself as a unique "urban" area of Houston if it continues to make improvement to its infrastructure. Also, let us be realistic, rail gives it an advantage over many other inner loop areas. It may not have happened yet, as rail has driven up land prices to where it has been hard for people to make proper use of TOD. However, who knows what may happen in the future.

I think comprehensive planning can be either great/terrible. How could have planning predicted real estate crashes, white flight, economic recessions, etc.; on the other hand, it could help the recovery process by implementing good land use practices. To me though, it's pretty hard to predict or plan what good land use may be in the future as it changes throughout time.

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It isn't simply a matter of location, there are many socioeconomic factors involved as well that Ricco67 touched upon. I don't think that Midtown is going to continue to be a "young hip area" indefinitely, but it can establish itself as a unique "urban" area of Houston if it continues to make improvement to its infrastructure. Also, let us be realistic, rail gives it an advantage over many other inner loop areas. It may not have happened yet, as rail has driven up land prices to where it has been hard for people to make proper use of TOD. However, who knows what may happen in the future.

I think comprehensive planning can be either great/terrible. How could have planning predicted real estate crashes, white flight, economic recessions, etc.; on the other hand, it could help the recovery process by implementing good land use practices. To me though, it's pretty hard to predict or plan what good land use may be in the future as it changes throughout time.

I agree, but as the economy starts turning around in the next year or so, people will move back in and the prices will start a steady increase.

Will the prices go up again like they have in the past? I don't think so, but I'd rather have a nice, slow, and steady increase than an astronomical jump.

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Plenty of houses and apartments in Midtown, but no condos to speak of, aye? Wonder why that is. Lots of condos in downtown, Montrose, River Oaks...

Edit: Well I guess there's a couple. Rise Lofts for example, and Edge, and 2016 Main.

Edited by kylejack

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But again, if it were simply a matter of location then why was Midtown (and Fourth Ward) so awful for so many years?

If anything I would be willing to bet that the long-term prognosis for Midtown is dire at best. The quality of many of the apartment blocks is poor, and once they start showing their age all those people who want to be close to the Museum District etc will turn tail and run. At that point the owners won't have much choice but to lower rents, and the downward spiral starts. The problem is compounded by the sheer number of rental units in a relatively small area, along with a lack of a stable residential base throughout much of the neighborhood, and a concentration of social service agencies and persistent problems with prostitution and drugs in the rest.

It's too bad, because if the city had been able to engage in any more comprehensive a planning process than granting a TIRZ and putting up clever new street signs, then things might have been different.

Everyone has already touched on most of the counterpoints to you. The only thing I can really add is...

You cannot compare Houston of the 70's and 80's to the Houston of today (and the same goes for many other cities around the country). The types of industry and jobs now, the population growth (and projected future numbers), etc. Heck, just think about our downtown and how far it has come (and is going). Discovery Green, new towers and buildings, nightlife, MASS TRANSIT, soon to be soccer stadium, etc. Think about Herman Park improvements since then, Miller Outdoor Theatre, the Med Center's insane explosion of growth, Reliant Stadium, Minute Maid, (and the list goes on). Midtown is in the middle of ALL of these improved things where millions and millions of dollars have been spent since the 80's (hence Midtown's surge in popularity since then).

Apartments are EVERYWHERE in Houston, and EVERYONE is at risk of them lowering property values of surrounding areas. While Midtown is no exception... neither is the rest of Houston... or the Woodlands... or Sugarland... or Katy (etc.).

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Plenty of houses and apartments in Midtown, but no condos to speak of, aye? Wonder why that is. Lots of condos in downtown, Montrose, River Oaks...

Edit: Well I guess there's a couple. Rise Lofts for example, and Edge, and 2016 Main.

Don't forget...

Park Lofts http://search.har.com/engine/dispSearch.cfm?mlnum=52446496&class=2

Chenevert Condominiums http://search.har.com/engine/dispSearch.cfm?mlnum=34108546&class=2&sType=0

Ellie Lofts http://search.har.com/engine/dispSearch.cfm?mlnum=5520982&class=2

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I thought the area east of Main/Fannin was full of townhomes and condos but I very well could be mistaken. The time I've actually driven in that area it was like night and day between the two areas, maybe the area I am referring isn't Midtown.

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I thought the area east of Main/Fannin was full of townhomes and condos but I very well could be mistaken. The time I've actually driven in that area it was like night and day between the two areas, maybe the area I am referring isn't Midtown.

That is Midtown (I live on that side). Tons of townhouses all over. That is the more "neighborhood" side of Midtown that no one really knows about. Check out Baldwin Park sometime when you're in the area.

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I thought the area east of Main/Fannin was full of townhomes and condos but I very well could be mistaken. The time I've actually driven in that area it was like night and day between the two areas, maybe the area I am referring isn't Midtown.

Lots of townhomes very few condos.

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In fact, 30 years ago, Midtown was Gulfton and Gulfton was Midtown. Gulfton was where the young, hip, and trendy professionals lived and partied, just as Midtown is today. The real estate crash of 1986 slayed that beast, and present day Gulfton rose from the carcas. Just as the Boomtown days helped fill Gulfton's apartments, the bubble of the last 10 years built Midtown. The only thing missing (so far) is the real estate crash.

Well, at least there will be plenty of people to fill in the unpopular apartments when it gets to that point, and then there will be people walking around all over the place since it'll probably be cheaper to walk than drive a car. cool.gif It will be an urbanists delight

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Hey guys I browse this site weekly however this is my first ever post! When I lived in Houston's Post Midtown Square 8-9 years ago I prayed that "Midtown" would eventually get developed into this true urban oasis that many Haif'ers (like myself) crave, but when I would come back to visit 2-3 times a year I would notice that "Midtown" was at best slow to develop and half of the new development was disappointing to say the least (i.e. both new suburban style CVS stores).

I live in Midtown Atlanta right in the mix of everything and would always wonder why Houston's "Midtown" couldn't get their act together. My neighborhood is vibrant, eclectic, and walkable with numerous newly developed and older highrise and midrise condos above retail.

When visiting Houston back in June of this year I finally realized that "Midtown" is really not comparable with Atlanta's Midtown in terms of demographics, economics, and development focus. For years I had been comparing apples and oranges. However what I did observe is that Houston does have an "Atlanta-like" midtown area but it's just not called "Midtown". In fact I'm not sure if it really has an identifying name at all. I'd say the area west/southwest of downtown extending pretty much all the way out towards the River Oaks/Uptown area is Houston's true "Midtown"!

The blighted area south/southwest of the CBD between downtown and the medical center has potential to be this great urban utopia, however I believe the attention of developers has always been the area more west of downtown for obvious reasons (demographics, median household income, population etc.)

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Landscaping is going in toward the northern end of the property. The oaks appear to be pretty good size.

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Hey guys I browse this site weekly however this is my first ever post! When I lived in Houston's Post Midtown Square 8-9 years ago I prayed that "Midtown" would eventually get developed into this true urban oasis that many Haif'ers (like myself) crave, but when I would come back to visit 2-3 times a year I would notice that "Midtown" was at best slow to develop and half of the new development was disappointing to say the least (i.e. both new suburban style CVS stores).

I live in Midtown Atlanta right in the mix of everything and would always wonder why Houston's "Midtown" couldn't get their act together. My neighborhood is vibrant, eclectic, and walkable with numerous newly developed and older highrise and midrise condos above retail.

When visiting Houston back in June of this year I finally realized that "Midtown" is really not comparable with Atlanta's Midtown in terms of demographics, economics, and development focus. For years I had been comparing apples and oranges. However what I did observe is that Houston does have an "Atlanta-like" midtown area but it's just not called "Midtown". In fact I'm not sure if it really has an identifying name at all. I'd say the area west/southwest of downtown extending pretty much all the way out towards the River Oaks/Uptown area is Houston's true "Midtown"!

The blighted area south/southwest of the CBD between downtown and the medical center has potential to be this great urban utopia, however I believe the attention of developers has always been the area more west of downtown for obvious reasons (demographics, median household income, population etc.)

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You are correct, CBD to Medical Center could be a fantastic Urban Utopia, but I think the difference between ATL and Houston is the lack of zoning. Without it, I've heard numerous sophisticated developers state that they are scared to make great investments into CBD/Midtown due to that reason. In addition, CBD is struggling to attract the type of jobs that are needed to sustain the urban utopia lifestyle. We do not have a great concentration of the creative class that would appreciate that type of environment. In addition, Rice University which is right in between the two employment centers never tried to integrate themselves into the city, which could have been a great conduit to building the creative class in Houston. I think Houston is a facinating city that could have a lot to offer, but the lack of vision of the city planners (or lack thereof) is the biggest problem. ATL was developed by intelligent design not by evolution and unregulated land development.

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In fact I'm not sure if it really has an identifying name at all. I'd say the area west/southwest of downtown extending pretty much all the way out towards the River Oaks/Uptown area is Houston's true "Midtown"!

That's Montrose, Upper Kirby and Greenway. That's three neighborhoods for the price of one. Houston: Bargain City. (Should've submitted that to the slogan contest.

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