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Harris County Courthouses And Square

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Bob lanier's light rail plan had failed when he was the mayor for the city.

Bob Lanier had no light rail plan. He ran for his first term against Whitmire and won on an anti-rail platform. Lanier then stacked the Metro board with anti-rail members who in turn increased the money diverted to the city of Houston for stret construction from Metro's budget, allowing Lanier to stop using city funds for street construction and use that money for more police. The rail plan at the time of Lanier's election wasn't light rail anyway; at that point an elevated monorail from downtown to Westchase was the leading candidate for a very nonspecific system that voters had approved several years before.

I don't think you can say any single mayor is solely responsible for something like the light rail system. Yes, during his term as mayor, Lanier was very vocal in his anti-rail stance. He has since changed his opinion and last year publically supported the rail component of the Metro Solutions plan. Brown was pro-rail, and did bring in Shirley DeLibero to head Metro with the intent that she would get a rail system up and running. Likewise he put pro-rail members on the Metro board. But the idea of a high capacity transit system on Main St. had been in the works for years, if not a decade or more. Brown's influence is just one of several factors that led to the system getting built, but I don't think you can say it was the deciding factor.

For all of his faults, yes Lee Brown accomplished some positive things in the city. However, some of what he's being given full credit for he only played a minor role in.

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I have to say that the building is growing on me. I didn't like the design initially but it's turning out to look better than I expected.

I also agree that Houston seem to have lost it's cutting edge spirit in a lot of things including building design. This is suppose to be Space City. Personally, I would have loved to have had Minute Maid Field, this new Criminal Justice Building, a lot of the new condo towers going up, some of the new projects in the Medical Center etc., with a more "forward" cutting edge look. It appears Atlanta has taken the "future" cutting edge title Houston used to have. Houston, shouldn't forget what it is.

It's not about "looking" cutting edge, it's about being honest, and maximizing contemporary materials, methods, and design to their fullest potential. An elegant, clever, or bold facade is one thing, but there's more to it. What is this building supposed to do and how do the architectonics of that building facilitate and/or accomplish this program? Ultimately, since the building has such a supposed high purpose in our society, then how does this building reflect upon that and therefore upon us?

More than anything, this building isn't exceptional at all. It's quite banal, even with it's facade and tacky top. If we live in a representative democracy, a government for the people by the people (via elected surrogates), then this municipal building speaks of our government, and therefore us, as being as unexceptional as it is.

I refuse to believe the city that built the Astrodome more than anything else as a monument to our ability to land a man of the moon as unexceptional, although there are many who believe it is. I'm not just talking about folks outside the metro area, but people who live and breath and make a living in this city without much less a damn or even contempt for their environment. It's called apathy, and it's a cronic disease this city has suffered through time and time again. This building is an exceptional example of that.

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I third it!

If anything, it looks like a tall version of a suburban office building with a dome! yuck!

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I'm not sure how one could define "cutting edge" design. If nothing else, it should be LEED-certified. That being said, the design imo fails in several ways. The proportions seem wrong, making the whole building seem squat and boxy and giving the appearance that a too-small dome was an afterthought dropped off on the roof. Notice how in the original version there was a defined setback on the upper floors. This gives the structure more visual height and better integrates with the dome.

It looks like the architects tried to compensate for the boxiness of the proportions by emphasizing vertical strips on the facades. The problem with that appproach is that the pediment seems to be perched upon toothpicks. It looks ungainly at best. Again, notice how in the original plan the verticality is balanced with prominent horizontal elements and the pediments relate to the setback portion, not the main facades, thereby minimizing the ungainliness. It looks like they started out making an effort to balance the whole composition and then just tossed it away. On a detailed basis, the windows seem way too short, emphasizing the squatness, and the fully glazed sections are just incongruent with the decorative detailing. If you want to include classical revival elements, I say great, but at least be consistent in the application. Here it just comes off as a strange mish-mash. Finally, as a matter of personal taste, the chocolate-brown stucco is just plain ugly.

I've never been one to believe that just because someone nicknamed Houston "Space City" that we should therefore have futuristic architecture, but in general I wish there was a greater demand for better design here. This thing is mediocre at best, and it seems that in general most major buildings recently have likewise settled for being no more than competent (viz. Hobby Center and Beck Building). MMP is the exception, though, just a wonderful design.

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My understanding of the nuances of architecture are not as refined as you folks. It looks nice to me. I liked the first design better, but this design will be fine.

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I agree with Subdude. I think the change in design is tragic. It has a ephemeral quality about it, like many of the structures in Las Vegas. Seeing the before and after, I would think that the budget got wacked.

Mind you I don't hate it. Although the dome just looks silly to me, like a fez or something. I just would have much rather seen the previous design go up.

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Both new courthouse buildings are dreadful. Nice? For tens of millions of dollars, buildings that represent "justice" in Houston and Harris County should be better than just nice. They should be more than just warmed over office buildings. They are not really a disappointment because I expect nothing less than mediocrity from the county. These buildings were both huge wastes of tax dollars. The county could have simply leased or purchased an existing building downtown (the Enron building would have been just fine) and accomplished several things for the city, not the least would have been reducing the vacancy rate downtown.

For the record, I hate these two buildings. The newest domed one is by far the most offensive because it trys so hard to fake significance. More tax dollars down the drain.

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I'm delighted to read the negative feelings about the County government and their design selections on this website... now, tell them how you feel!!!!!

Harris County government needs to be brought into the 21st century. Take a look at the design of Harris County Tollroad facilities... no decorative touches, no landscaping, huge rusting columns (Sam Houston Tollroad ramps), and poorly designed signage. They make the new TxDOT facilities look positively enlightened (and they are not!).

These buildings are a true reflection of poor leadership... and taste. Luckily, they don't hold a prominent position on our skyline (at least from the west), so I don't have to look at them much... and hopefully I won't ever have to visit them either, right??

Harris County Commissioners Court is a bunch of yahoo, good ol' boys (except for Sylvia Garcia). As powerful as they are, its definitely time to implement term limits for these idiots... or, just go ahead and expect more crap like these buildings.

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and let me remind everyone that these are the same folks that are trying to pave over our city with tollroads, repeatedly have fought light-rail initiatives, and have lined historic Buffalo Bayou with prisons. :angry:

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Can anyone name a government building in Houston (City, County or Federal) that's worth a damn?

Really, I'm asking. I think the US Customs House on San Jacinto is a nice old building.

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Well, since you're asking, I've always held a little place in my heart for the downtown library. I think it's the way it sits like a big hunk of out-of-place concrete next to the old library and city hall; the way, to me, it represents "cutting-edge" architecture of the "urban cowboy" 70's Houston.

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Well, since you're asking, I've always held a little place in my heart for the downtown library. I think it's the way it sits like a big hunk of out-of-place concrete next to the old library and city hall; the way, to me, it represents "cutting-edge" architecture of the "urban cowboy" 70's Houston.

Agreed, the library's Jones Building is especially awesome at night when it's all lit up inside. The library's 1926 Juila Ideson Building next door is one of the most beautiful buildings in Texas. Drive by the library's newest building at 7405 Stella Link between Braeswood and Bellaire, it's also a fantastic building. Those three buildings are all completely different styles of architecture and from different eras but are all excellent examples of architecture that is/was contemporary for its own time. The county and many people who are in the postition of making decisions about what gets built are stuck in a 19th century time warp and won't come out.

Most of us prefer cars from 2005, not 1945. We rather use a Pentium4 or G5 computer than an IBM Selectric typewriter to get our work done. We prefer a microwave to rubbing two sticks together to warm our food. We prefer a cellphone to a telegraph, but when it comes to buildings - so many people can only find comfort, beauty, and legitimacy in design types from 100 or more years ago.

I don't get it.

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Because design is important.  It helps make a city great, instead of just a collection of structures.  Nobody is claiming that cities can be made up exclusively of exceptional architecture, but that doesn't lead to the conclusion that we should threfore gladly accept, or a least not criticize, mediocre buildings.  Density is only one consideration of many; it isn't necessarily the most important one.  I think Houston as a whole has been way too willing, over way too long a period, to accept any kind of second-rate development for the sake of development, without considering its broader contribution to the city.  We love this city, so why should we not have higher standards for how it is built?

I guess maybe I just like that building. I would probably have a differnt opinion if it looked like the Mercer.

I dont know why I like it, I just do. It has a mediteranean feel to it, almost, with that dome (I assume its going to be gold in color). I like the way the color of the building flows with some of those older buildings in that side of downtown, not to mention MMP. I like the features of it also.

But that's just me.

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As far as public buildings go the Moneo addition to the MFAH (the Beck building) is a great example of Islamic architecture, especially its interior and the top floor. The subterrainean patio with its series of cascading pools adjacent to Cafe Express does not work for some reason. It always appears dirty, windswept and uninviting.

The new Metro building on the Pierce elevated is conservative but quite nice in its overall impact. I like it.

The Texas Heart Institute, hidden from Holcombe Street behind a huge and obtrusive parking garage, is an excellent example of what a thoughtful architect can do. Imo it's among the best buildings built in Houston in the last several years.

The uncompleted Harris County court building squats on the downtown landscape like a rear-ended Cadillac waiting to be towed. The people of Harris County need an expanded county court complex. That is undeniable but God save us from being judged by the people responsible for this unfortunate squandering of taxpayer resources.

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As far as public buildings go the Moneo addition to the MFAH (the Beck building) is a great example of Islamic architecture, especially its interior and the top floor.  The subterrainean patio with its series of cascading pools adjacent to Cafe Express does not work for some reason.  It always appears dirty, windswept and uninviting.

The new Metro building on the Pierce elevated is conservative but quite nice in its overall impact.  I like it.

The Texas Heart Institute, hidden from Holcombe Street behind a huge and obtrusive parking garage, is an excellent example of what a thoughtful architect can do. Imo it's among the best buildings built in Houston in the last several years.

The uncompleted Harris County court building squats on the downtown landscape like a rear-ended Cadillac waiting to be towed.  The people of Harris County need an expanded county court complex.  That is undeniable but God save us from being judged by the people responsible for this unfortunate squandering of taxpayer resources.

Agreed!

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It's not a great building, but look what's around it. You can't expect the highest standards when there's nothing to work off of. Architects (or architecture enthusiasts) might know how to make it better, but for regular folks to demand more, there has to be an existing environment that people can look at and say, "Whoa, this doesn't work here!" And perhaps as more buildings go up in the area, people will start to be critical and say, "this one adds, this one detracts." It takes time to build public taste, and mistakes have to be made along the way. But when all you have is decayed buildings and parking lots, anything is a step in the right direction.

Besides, it really isn't that bad. I think that from the freeways or the air, it adds a new feature to our skyline.

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I have to agree with H-Town on this point.

You have to remember that there has been an age-old problem with making a building look good and having a building that's functional. There are many instances of buildings that LOOK great, but are structual failures.

In regards to the looks of a building overall being subjective:

The Eiffel Tower in Paris was considered an eye-sore for years. Who is to say that the courthouse won't endure?

Then again, I wouldn't want my tax dollars to make something look pretty, but be so ineffecient that we'd have to build another in a few years.

Ricco

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Agreed, the library's Jones Building is especially awesome at night when it's all lit up inside. The library's 1926 Juila Ideson Building next door is one of the most beautiful buildings in Texas.

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the meyerson symphony center in dallas is simply beautiful.  but for the most part, it seems a lot of new designers attempt to go for shock value instead of true beauty.  houston's symphony counterpart jones hall just looks like a bomb shelter.

Interesting. I've never known anyone to call Jones Hall a bomb shelter. I think it's an amazing building (especially in plan) and also beautiful. Different strokes...

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jones hall is a classic piece of modern architecture. i wonder if danes75 has been inside jones hall? i didn't appreciate jones hall until i had been inside several times. i was sitting upstairs at a cafe table up against a wall this past year (k.d.lang with the houston symphony). i've been in this area several times over the years but never noticed how the limestone wall panels extend out past the windows. it is kind of a frank lloyd wright experience. the definition of inside and out is subtly blurred where these tall "sliver" windows are placed. it was after seeing "stomp" one year that i began to realize the soft curved facade that provides wonderful flow for crowds leaving jones hall. the curved facade inside the square, block size portico is my favorite design feature. (i hope i'm getting my architectural terms correct.) when i was younger, i perceived this building as simply an off white square. it took several years for me to begin to appreciate it's nuances. however, i'm not fond of the long....long rows of seats, the size of the seats or the red carpet. always, always purchase box seats if you have the means.

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jones hall is a classic piece of modern architecture.  i wonder if danes75 has been inside jones hall?  i didn't appreciate jones hall until i had been inside several times.  i was sitting upstairs at a cafe table up against a wall this past year (k.d.lang with the houston symphony).  i've been in this area several times over the years but never noticed how the limestone wall panels extend out past the windows.  it is kind of a frank lloyd wright experience.  the definition of inside and out is subtly blurred where these tall "sliver" windows are placed.  it was after seeing "stomp" one year that i began to realize the soft curved facade that provides wonderful flow for crowds leaving jones hall. the curved facade inside the square, block size portico is my favorite design feature. (i hope i'm getting my architectural terms correct.)  when i was younger, i perceived this building as simply an off white square.  it took several years for me to begin to appreciate it's nuances.  however, i'm not fond of the long....long rows of seats, the size of the seats or the red carpet.  always, always purchase box seats if you have the means.

I like Jones Hall too. It's very elegant the way it sits on that gently sloping lot and the creamy exterior and tall, thin columns are very pleasing to me. I'm not sure what a bomb shelter looks like on the outside. I agree about the long rows of seats. About ten years ago I attended Diana Ross's last Houston concert. She went unwisely) into the audience and down a long row of seats. She became disoriented and panic ensued because she couldn't get out. She definitely lost it.

I agree too with Danes75 about the Meyerson. It's an excellent piece of architecture and easily gets my vote for best place to hear a symphony orchestra in our fair estado.

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jones hall is a classic piece of modern architecture.  i wonder if danes75 has been inside jones hall?  i didn't appreciate jones hall until i had been inside several times.  i was sitting upstairs at a cafe table up against a wall this past year (k.d.lang with the houston symphony).  i've been in this area several times over the years but never noticed how the limestone wall panels extend out past the windows.  it is kind of a frank lloyd wright experience.  the definition of inside and out is subtly blurred where these tall "sliver" windows are placed.  it was after seeing "stomp" one year that i began to realize the soft curved facade that provides wonderful flow for crowds leaving jones hall. the curved facade inside the square, block size portico is my favorite design feature. (i hope i'm getting my architectural terms correct.)  when i was younger, i perceived this building as simply an off white square.  it took several years for me to begin to appreciate it's nuances.  however, i'm not fond of the long....long rows of seats, the size of the seats or the red carpet.  always, always purchase box seats if you have the means.

It's not a classic piece of modern architecture. It's a good period piece. The El Paso building, the University of St. Thomas, the Brown Pavilion at MFAH may qualify as classics of modern architecture, it depends how stingy you're being with the term 'classic.' The Kimball Museum in Fort Worth might be the only hands-down classic in Texas.

I think Jones Hall is a nice building, but here's the problem: it's a mediocre concert hall. It was designed as a multi-purpose auditorium that has since been altered to improve its acoustics for symphony. Comparing it to one of the nation's great, dedicated concert halls is like comparing a Ford to a Mercedes. I hope that in a few years we can get a new concert hall, and then hopefully save Jones and use it for something else (but I doubt it). Also, consider that when Jones was built, none of the tall buildings around it were there. Think of the untapped potential for complementing that section of the skyline.

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i would hate to lose jones hall; however, i wouldn't mind having a new structure specifically for the symphony. retrofitting jones hall for a new use, i'm all for.

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I have actually been in Jones Hall. The interiors are nice, but the building itself is not. Same goes for the Wortham Center. Its a box... plain and simple. The interiors are ok, but those giant sculpture things by the escalators are definately not my taste. Its a bit like saying the interiors of the new justice center may be exquisite... even though the structure looks a bit like half a tampon.

And what IS the deal with the lights at night? Houston's skyline is much nicer than Dallas', but at night there's no comparison that Dallas' looks better. Why the hell don't they light anything?

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As far as public buildings go the Moneo addition to the MFAH (the Beck building) is a great example of Islamic architecture, especially its interior and the top floor.

Interesting observation. How so? In that it is inward-facing rather than addressing the street?

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And what IS the deal with the lights at night? Houston's skyline is much nicer than Dallas', but at night there's no comparison that Dallas' looks better. Why the hell don't they light anything?

Houston's cheap. plain and simple. The building owners here act like lighting their buildings with some style is going to cause the business to go bankrupt. I do hope to see the dome lit up in a more fashionable manor.

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I'm not sure if cheap is the reason entirely. I think someone posted a while back that there was an ordinance passed some years ago that limited what could be put on downtown highrises in terms of lighting and marquees. This may not entirely be the reason why there is lighting on Houston's central skyscrapers compared to some others but I think that it's played a part in it.

I think the lighting on BOA tower is more a case of being a bit too understated rather than not having ANY lighting. There is lighting in the niches of the corners at the higher elevations but the lighting is very subdued. Stronger lighting in those areas would bring that building out. As for the former Enron Towers, the newer tower should have more consistently strong lighting now that it has a legitimate, longterm owner.

I think the biggest calamity is the absence of lighting on the Texaco Heritage Tower, Chase Tower and Chevron Towers. Their heights and positioning within the skyline screams for enhanced lighting at night. If the Chevron Tower were lit in the same fashion as the new 5 Houston Center, I think that alone would improve the skyline's night visibility.

As for the topic at hand, I have to believe that the dome will be lit in some fashion but the question for me is will it be modest like most of the other buildings downtown or will it be a bit more extravagant?

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Houston is cheap? The building owners in Dallas and Houston are all the same. I think lighting downtown buildings is being overplayed here. So what if Dallas is more lit up at night. Both downtowns would be a beacon to nowhere. I'd rather concentrate on getting more people downtown at night. Lighting is secondary

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Actually, I also don't mind the lack of lights. I'd rather work on street level activity during the day AND night as well as working on getting a higher occupancy level downtown.

As for the new courthouse dome being lit... even if they do light her in grand fashion, I'd give it about ONE week before there would be an official petition calling on turning off the lights because it's a waste of tax payer money... Building owners aren't the only cheap folks out there.

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Interesting observation.  How so?  In that it is inward-facing rather than addressing the street?

Yes, exactly SD. The subterrainean waterfall is a perfect example of this. Those 'watercooler' vents on top are a little disconcerting but appropriate to this design as they allow a diffuse, natural light to illuminate the upper salons and make the two stark windows overlooking St. Paul's and downtown and the old museum along Main seem less abrupt. The building's stark and modern Binz Street face interacts nicely with the surrounding institutional buildings. Unfortunately, the Beck's back face does nothing for the front entrance to the old and well-furnished Warwick Hotel. I guess that's what they get for cutting that old tapestry to fit.

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Lighting is very important. When you see lights, especially creative lighting, it speaks of vibrancy and fun and beauty. Without lights, it makes people think everything's closed up for the night. Just think of Times Square. Lots of light, lots of neon. Maybe the businesses are open, maybe they aren't, but it LOOKS like the entire city is up and hanging out there.

The Republic Center in Dallas has a wonderful kaleidoscope that changes images and colors on its sail. That Continental thing is kinda nice, but hello... its dark outside, who's the moron that thought navy blue would stand out????

Dallas' night life is picking up... quite a bit faster than Houston's it seems. My company designed the interior of Blue, a multilevel night club in downtown D, and recent stats show that residential development in downtown Dallas increased 747% between 1995 & 2005.

AND... the same people don't run the buildings in both cities; the majority of highrises in Dallas are run by Trammell Crow.

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CourtsFX.jpg

Anyone know the status of this place? When I was back in town I use to pass by this place all the time. While watching the Astros on TV I would see it in the background. It looks complete.

Have they started on that plaza up front?

What's the status on that juvenile court or is it jail? I believe It was an existing building they were renovating.

I've looked through pass threads, couldnt find anything(didn't look hard though).

I'm sure y'all would know.

Edited by Houstonian in Iraq

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Well I know that the one on the left is done. The one on the right is topped out and the facade is completer. Not sure if it is open yet though, there may be some interior work still. Oh yeah and the one on the right has a different facade it is kind of a red stone and blue windows. I want to say I heard they may scrap the plaza this was a long time ago and I do not know the credibility of the source. I haven't been there on the surface streets recently so I couldn't say if anything new has happened with the plaza.

Ok I found a pic taken by Mancuso. Kind of old but it gives an idea of the facade.

37479791.jpg

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Yeah I meant the one on the right. On TV there weren't any cranes so I figured the outside was done or close to it.

That sucks about the plaza was looking foward to it, sure hope your sorce was wrong.

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That sucks about the plaza was looking foward to it, sure hope your sorce was wrong.

Yeah so do I. I am not sure where I heard that it may have been more than 8, 9 months ago. If anyone has been by it recently they could probably give you more info on the plaza. It would be a really nice touch to the complex though.

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Building on the left, with curved roof is Criminal Courts Building. It opened in Jan. 2001. Building on right is Civil Courts Building. It, and the Juvenile court bldg. will open for business in Jan. 2006. At that time, the Family Law bldg. and the old 1900 courthouse will close for renovation.

I have not heard that the plaza is scrapped. It is currently still a parking lot.

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You know, I don't know if they named the area, but I think "Justice Square" is rather appropriate.

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The plaza is the centerpiece of the courthouse complex. The function of the plaza is to hold an underground jury assembly area, with tunnel access to each of the four (5?) courthouses. It will replace the crowded and inefficient assembly area currently in use. Of course, it will be landscaped with the fountain.

Given its importance to the overall complex, as well as the fact that it is the least expensive item, I can't believe it would not be built. The county says the jury assembly area is expected to open 1st quarter 2006, so the next few months should see some activity.

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The plaza is the centerpiece of the courthouse complex.  The function of the plaza is to hold an underground jury assembly area, with tunnel access to each of the four (5?) courthouses.  It will replace the crowded and inefficient assembly area currently in use.  Of course, it will be landscaped with the fountain.

Given its importance to the overall complex, as well as the fact that it is the least expensive item, I can't believe it would not be built.  The county says the jury assembly area is expected to open 1st quarter 2006, so the next few months should see some activity.

Cool B) Good idea for the plaza, underground jury assembly and a cool pedestrian area. Now if going through the plaza would be the only way to get to the underground jury assembly area there would be loads of pedestrian traffic there everyday <_<

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That is probably going to be the case, since the tunnels will be secure. In other words, you have to get into the tunnels by going through a building entrance with metal detectors.

The current jury assembly area is at Congress and Fannin. There is already lots of foot traffic in the area, with jurors, attorneys and court participants and personnel coming and going from 3 courthouses. It will be even more active when all 5 court buildings are built and renovated, and all court activity is consolidated in that 6 block area.

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