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Houston Community College Frustrations


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<rant>

I have been pondering changing careers over the past few months, while making my own hours(days,weeks,months) is grand and the money pretty good, I like the consistency of having a regular paycheck and bennies.

My goal is to learn advanced/technical spanish for translating in the medical center. From there, I intend on learning either Manderin, italian, along with some other languages for the same reasons.

I've been having some serious roadblocks: The damned college hasn't called me back after repeated attempts over the past 3 weeks and its getting on my nerves.

Makes me seriously reconsider doing this and seeing if I can do it without a proper certification, but that would hurt my cred (particularly having a hispanic last name) if I don't know how to say "colonoscopy" and say "endoscopy" or vica versa.

</rant>

I find myself in Red's position in debating whether I truly want the freedom of working the hours that I want (ranging from 20 hours to 80 hours weekly, depending on business), to a relatively steady 40.

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I have been pondering changing careers over the past few months, while making my own hours(days,weeks,months) is grand and the money pretty good, I like the consistency of having a regular paycheck and bennies.

How much more compensation are we talking and how old are you? If you're more than half-way through your working life, it becomes increasingly difficult to jump into an unrelated field and start a new career from scratch, not only because you'll have fewer years to leverage your new skills but because the opportunity cost of education gets to be ridiculously high when you're already earning decent money and you have to decide between spending time at study or at work.

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How much more compensation are we talking and how old are you? If you're more than half-way through your working life, it becomes increasingly difficult to jump into an unrelated field and start a new career from scratch, not only because you'll have fewer years to leverage your new skills but because the opportunity cost of education gets to be ridiculously high when you're already earning decent money and you have to decide between spending time at study or at work.

I would agree with you if we were talking about going to med or law school at 45 and weren't independently wealthy (or supported).

But otherwise growth, change and other intangibles trump opportunity cost in this equation.

Besides, not making a change could very well turn someone into economic roadkill down the line, if their current well-compensated gig ceases to be.

Edited by crunchtastic
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<rant>

My goal is to learn advanced/technical spanish for translating in the medical center. From there, I intend on learning either Manderin, italian, along with some other languages for the same reasons.

Makes me seriously reconsider doing this and seeing if I can do it without a proper certification, but that would hurt my cred (particularly having a hispanic last name) if I don't know how to say "colonoscopy" and say "endoscopy" or vica versa.

</rant>

I find myself in Red's position in debating whether I truly want the freedom of working the hours that I want (ranging from 20 hours to 80 hours weekly, depending on business), to a relatively steady 40.

stay clear of italian, it is a dying language. chinese would be good. call fausto vergara at HCC southeast. (713) 718-7203 he speaks numerous languages and might be able to lead you to a program where technical spanish is taught. there probably aren't many.

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About 5 years ago, my friend's father was laid off as a spanish translator at the local hospital. They were going to an online/phone type service. I suspect this will become more and more prevalent as technology makes the interaction more and more like being there in person.

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How much more compensation are we talking and how old are you? If you're more than half-way through your working life, it becomes increasingly difficult to jump into an unrelated field and start a new career from scratch, not only because you'll have fewer years to leverage your new skills but because the opportunity cost of education gets to be ridiculously high when you're already earning decent money and you have to decide between spending time at study or at work.

From a purely financial standpoint (the ability to continually fund your 401K vs. time off for school and what that really is going to cost you over the long haul), I agree with you 100%. However

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