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River Oaks District: Retail/Office/Residential On Westcreek Ln.


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11 hours ago, asubrt said:

That might be true about Neiman Marcus, which does feel pretty elitist (not unexpected for a Dallas company after all)... but I don't think that's the case with Nordstrom. It's an awesome store with great customer service and it doesn't really feel obnoxious at all. If anything I'd throw Saks in that former camp before Nordstrom.

Yes, absolutely.  Saks is a better fit for that description than Nordstrom. 

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7 hours ago, LBC2HTX said:

This area desperately needs a casual cafe. This will do well. 

This area desperately needs tenants in general. I'm kind of taken back by how many places have come and gone from here.

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11 hours ago, Big E said:

This area desperately needs tenants in general. I'm kind of taken back by how many places have come and gone from here.

Haw many vacancies are there in this development? 

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21 minutes ago, Fortune said:

Haw many vacancies are there in this development? 

I know there are at least 10?

Former Akris, Tom Ford, Cavalli, the furniture store, former forty five ten etc. 

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4 minutes ago, iah77 said:

I know there are at least 10?

Former Akris, Tom Ford, Cavalli, the furniture store, former forty five ten etc. 

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^^^ pleeeeaaaase bring back forty-five ten, this boutique was like a mini neiman marcus.  MAGNIFICENT!

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9 minutes ago, monarch said:

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^^^ pleeeeaaaase bring back forty-five ten, this boutique was like a mini neiman marcus.  MAGNIFICENT!

Forty Five Ten was destroyed when its old owner died and the new owner made bad hires. They closed all their stores besides downtown Dallas location and it's only open 3 days a week at that. It had so much potential before it was ruined. I loved their NYC store before it closed. 

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Yeah, Forty Five Ten is not coming back. They'll be doing well just to survive.

But the good news for Forty Five Ten fans is that Brian Bolke (the co-founder of Forty Five Ten), is coming back to River Oaks District with his new store The Conservatory.

Edited by Houston19514
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1 minute ago, Houston19514 said:

The turnover at ROD is probably not particularly unusual, especially for a pretty new center such as this in times of a pandemic.

I think it is. What is unusual is that prime tenants have reverted back to the Galleria (i.e tom ford, akris, probably dior). ROD's sister project in Atlanta [Buckhead Village] which opened with an almost identical tenant mix has not seen the same wave of departures. I think the stores in ROD attract a lot of people to the restaurants due to making it seem very upscale. Would Toulouse be so busy if not next to a very aesthetically pleasing dior store?  Probably not? These two other similar complexes saw a boost after covid, not what's happening here. 

In Dallas, Highland Park Village's departures have led to even more niche and upscale retailers opening in the void while ROD's are left vacant a long time and heading in a direction that will scare away the original tenants.  

I don't really care, I'm just scratching my head on the re-alignment since I think Houston should be able to support 3-4 high end centers like Dallas has. 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, iah77 said:

I think it is. What is unusual is that prime tenants have reverted back to the Galleria (i.e tom ford, akris, probably dior). ROD's sister project in Atlanta [Buckhead Village] which opened with an almost identical tenant mix has not seen the same wave of departures. I think the stores in ROD attract a lot of people to the restaurants due to making it seem very upscale. Would Toulouse be so busy if not next to a very aesthetically pleasing dior store?  Probably not? These two other similar complexes saw a boost after covid, not what's happening here. 

In Dallas, Highland Park Village's departures have led to even more niche and upscale retailers opening in the void while ROD's are left vacant a long time and heading in a direction that will scare away the original tenants.  

I don't really care, I'm just scratching my head on the re-alignment since I think Houston should be able to support 3-4 high end centers like Dallas has. 

 

 

Take a look at the Buckhead Village map.  They have at least as many empty spaces as ROD.

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22 minutes ago, iah77 said:

I think it is. What is unusual is that prime tenants have reverted back to the Galleria (i.e tom ford, akris, probably dior). ROD's sister project in Atlanta [Buckhead Village] which opened with an almost identical tenant mix has not seen the same wave of departures. I think the stores in ROD attract a lot of people to the restaurants due to making it seem very upscale. Would Toulouse be so busy if not next to a very aesthetically pleasing dior store?  Probably not? These two other similar complexes saw a boost after covid, not what's happening here. 

In Dallas, Highland Park Village's departures have led to even more niche and upscale retailers opening in the void while ROD's are left vacant a long time and heading in a direction that will scare away the original tenants.  

I don't really care, I'm just scratching my head on the re-alignment since I think Houston should be able to support 3-4 high end centers like Dallas has. 

 

 

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^^^ actually, we are all "scratching our heads" wondering just when are they going to break ground... and start constructing the long awaited... RIVER OAKS DISTRICT HOTEL.  heck, if this was dallas or austin, the hotel would not just be completely constructed, it would be a monumental significant brand catering to the most elite patrons.  at times, houston seems to be just too damn lethargic, bureaucratic, and complacent.  sure, enough, we have ALL faced some very difficult past couple of years per se.  however, ROD is a very beautiful and significant development that should be moving forward... not surrendering.  JUST CONSTRUCT THE DAMN HOTEL ALREADY...

 

Edited by monarch
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18 minutes ago, iah77 said:

I think it is. What is unusual is that prime tenants have reverted back to the Galleria (i.e tom ford, akris, probably dior). ROD's sister project in Atlanta [Buckhead Village] which opened with an almost identical tenant mix has not seen the same wave of departures. I think the stores in ROD attract a lot of people to the restaurants due to making it seem very upscale. Would Toulouse be so busy if not next to a very aesthetically pleasing dior store?  Probably not? These two other similar complexes saw a boost after covid, not what's happening here. 

In Dallas, Highland Park Village's departures have led to even more niche and upscale retailers opening in the void while ROD's are left vacant a long time and heading in a direction that will scare away the original tenants.  

I don't really care, I'm just scratching my head on the re-alignment since I think Houston should be able to support 3-4 high end centers like Dallas has. 

 

 

 

Just now, Houston19514 said:

Take a look at the Buckhead Village map.  They have at least as many empty spaces as ROD.

The luxury stores at Buckhead Village were leaving for Phipps and Lenox before River Oaks District even started losing tenants to the Galleria. 

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I think it is still too soon to understand the impact of the pandemic on retail/consumer activity and foot traffic at retail locations.  At super high priced luxury malls, smaller boutiques and stores not supported by global giants don't have the resources to stick it out and make mid-course changes.  ROD doesn't draw on the presence of office workers to the extent that downtown locations do in America's cities.  But what we see in places like NY and Chi is that without a steady influx of suburban office workers into downtowns on a five day a week basis , the retail and restaurants in the area aren't going to make their numbers to support their pre-pandemic rents. 

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Makes me wonder how many years it will take before they buy the Target property and convert it. The way they developed this, it would be very easy to connect all the way to San Felipe. 

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On 6/10/2022 at 12:18 PM, iah77 said:

I know there are at least 10?

Former Akris, Tom Ford, Cavalli, the furniture store, former forty five ten etc. 

Tom Ford space is no longer vacant.  Not sure where Akris was and I don't recall a furniture store at all, let alone its location.  FWIW, it's odd, but their website is not up to date. There are some new stores open that are not shown on their website and there are more currently under construction that are also not on their website.

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Our hotels' RevPARs are too low to support new development (with the exception of The Post Oak which doesn't release their information since they aren't part of a chain), especially with the rapidly rising construction costs. Houston's hotels rely on business travel which typically has a cap on room rates and their RevPAR peaked in 2014 when oil peaked. Our only hope for a new hotel that isn't an ego tower (Tilman's) is that the high energy prices start translating to higher RevPAR.

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On 6/11/2022 at 2:58 PM, Triton said:

Makes me wonder how many years it will take before they buy the Target property and convert it. The way they developed this, it would be very easy to connect all the way to San Felipe. 

I've spoken to lawyers with knowledge about Target's retail numbers at this site and how that land is being valued internally with expectations of where the area is headed in the next 5 years. Whoever tries to do it will have to take it from Target's cold, dead hands.

We're talking retail at the site so I am surprised no one mentioned what seems like a decent success, and thats Saint Bernard. I got clients that go there, I go there sometimes, its always busy on the weekends now, and last winter season was crazy there. Maybe they just don't have the right retail mix? Tom Ford never made much sense to me there, despite people who could afford tom ford shopping down the street at saint bernards and buying like 500 dollars of golf shirts [about 3.5 shirts, lol]. They shouldn't try and be an extension of the Galleria's uber-luxury section, they should be themselves and figure out really draws in the pockets of the people surrounding them. They have a few examples, so build around that.

Edited by X.R.
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23 hours ago, SMU1213 said:

Our hotels' RevPARs are too low to support new development (with the exception of The Post Oak which doesn't release their information since they aren't part of a chain), especially with the rapidly rising construction costs. Houston's hotels rely on business travel which typically has a cap on room rates and their RevPAR peaked in 2014 when oil peaked. Our only hope for a new hotel that isn't an ego tower (Tilman's) is that the high energy prices start translating to higher RevPAR.

Any insight as to what is behind this?  Is it purely an issue of volume?

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17 minutes ago, mattyt36 said:

Any insight as to what is behind this?  Is it purely an issue of volume?

Supply, lack of quality product, lack of tourism, age of existing hotels, etc. 

Think about how poorly our high-end hotels compare to the same flags in other cities. Our Four Seasons just got a face lift, but you still have low ceiling heights and other issues that couldn't be fixed due to it being an older building. Our JW Marriott and St Regis are two of the worst ones in the country. 

I'm hopeful that The Thompson will get some high rates. If they do, I bet we see three hotel starts in the next few years (if hard costs normalize).

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  • The title was changed to River Oaks District: Retail/Office/Residential On Westcreek Ln.
  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/7/2022 at 6:51 AM, IntheKnowHouston said:

The name of the Italian restaurant is no longer Ti Amo. The owners switched it to Bari sometime late last year. Houston Chronicle reported this is in an article listing anticipated restaurant openings for 2022 (but failed to inform readers it was previously reported as Ti Amo).

 

 

A rendering of Bari, the Italian restaurant opening soon at River Oaks District. The address listed is 4444 Westheimer Rd, Ste A-175.

 

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