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I'm curious as to what everyone thinks of it. It was the last big project of note during the 80's, and it's been through several name changes throughout it's tenure.

It just seems so odd that it isn't connected to the tunnels (The food court below doesn't count), and that they're only now establishing retail above ground...

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Texaco Heritage Plaza is one of my favorite buildings anywhere. I think it's beautiful. While it does not have a "tunnel" connection, it is connected to the downtown tunnel system by way of a skywalk. There are a number of buildings downtown that, for one reason or another, either chose to or were forced to use skywalk connections rather than tunnel connections.Texaco Heritage Plaza

Actually, compared to a lot of other downtown buildings, the name changes have been pretty minor. So far I believe, it has been known only by two names and the change between these two was pretty minor:

(1) Heritage Plaza

(2) Texaco Heritage Plaza

(and I presume a third name change, or at least a reversion to the original "Heritage Plaza" name will be coming soon)

Compare that to, for example:

Allied Bank Plaza --> First Interstate Bank Plaza --> Wells Fargo Plaza or

Texas Commerce Tower --> Chase Tower --> JPMorgan Chase Tower or

RepublicBank Center --> NCNB Center --> NationsBank Center --> Bank of America Center

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It's no great beauty, but it's good that we were able to pick up at least one example of a post-modern-style skyscraper before building shut down after the bust of the 1980s. It's good to have some contrast with the older-style "glass tube" buildings (eg Wells Fargo, Enron) and still older concrete boxes (eg Allen Center, Shell). Probably when this was built no one would have guessed that it would be 15 years before there would be more downtown highrise contruction. I think this was known back in the 1980s for being Houston's premiere empty skyscraper for a long time. The original developers must have lost a ton of money.

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Texaco Heritage Plaza is one of my favorite buildings anywhere.  I think it's beautiful.  While it does not have a "tunnel" connection, it is connected to the downtown tunnel system by way of a skywalk.  There are a number of buildings downtown that, for one reason or another, either chose to or were forced to use skywalk connections rather than tunnel connections.Texaco Heritage Plaza

Actually, compared to a lot of other downtown buildings, the name changes have been pretty minor.  So far I believe, it has been known only by two names and the change between these two was pretty minor:

(1) Heritage Plaza

(2) Texaco Heritage Plaza

(and I presume a third name change, or at least a reversion to the original "Heritage Plaza" name will be coming soon)

Compare that to, for example:

Allied Bank Plaza --> First Interstate Bank Plaza --> Wells Fargo Plaza  or

Texas Commerce Tower --> Chase Tower --> JPMorgan Chase Tower or

RepublicBank Center --> NCNB Center -->  NationsBank Center -->  Bank of America Center

Yeah, I remember writing the sourcing for some of the emporis material quoted. I think I finally added ChevronTexaco Heritage Plaza (for the year or two it was named that). They finally removed the massive granite Texaco logo from the Smith Street entrance once they moved.

I still think it's odd that it's connected to the Doubletree opposed to the parking garage across from it.

Though, I'm sure everyone remembers how prominent the building's presence was during the Rendez-vous Houston concert, before it's completion. Not that many buildings have a 22 story screen constructed onto the framework during construction, just to make a concert better.

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  • 2 months later...

Obviously, it's been a while since anyone posted on this thread, but since I'm new, I hope you'll forgive me.

I'm a big fan of the Heritage Plaza building, and I'm amazed at how many people don't realize that the top of the building is modeled on the concept of an Aztec temple. I've spent some time on the 50th floor of 1100 Louisiana in an office that lines up perfectly to look at that detail, and it's just terrific. It might be a little gimmicky for some tastes, but that is, far and away, my favorite skyscraper in town.

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yes...

perhaps...

Yaknow, and when I was posting this I thought "I'm not sure if it's Aztec or Mayan, so I'll just pick one." Aaaand I guess I picked wrong.

Thank you for your ever so constructive criticism. Now I know and I won't make that mistake again.

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  • 3 months later...

Looks like Heritage might actually house some new companies now. I hope someone moves in, I'd hate to just see it sit empty. It's a beautiful building.

From the article:

"Atlanta-based Goddard Investment Group on Wednesday purchased the 53-story tower and two acres of adjacent land for between $125 million and $130 million, according to sources.

The sale coincides with its largest tenant vacating nearly half of the space in the 1.15 million-square-foot property. That will leave it about 70 percent vacant by year's end."

Read more...

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Pro, read the entire article, not just the first sentence.

I was there last year when they removed the granite Texaco "T" out front.

Looks really funny without it now.

But considering Chevron moved their people to Enron II, is this really that big news? It's just shifting the pieces of a chess game.

Otherwise Enron II would be empty.

But the new Drubi's may take a hit.

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Houston is declining, declining. Damn, I'm really afraid now.

I'm terrified. I'm in the energy business.

ChevronTexaco is a huge player. If they pull out of Houston and go some place else, what does that say to the rest of the gas business? ... After this year, I'm not moving back to the East Coast, I don't care how "close everything is."

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The only news here is that the building is changing hands. Nothing else changes. In fact, Houston is gaining ChevronTexaco jobs from NO, and CA. There are a few more energy companies relocating to Houston as well. Including, Citigroup (startup not relocation) and Constellation Energy from Baltimore. Let's take a deep breath guys.

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I'm not worried at all. The moving game with companies within downtown happens for various reasons.

Chevron will only add more employees than get rid of. I know at least 10 people back in Louisiana that work for Chevron. The company will slowly move all employees from Louisiana to Houston. And not just Houston but downtown Houston. I can see them filling both of hte Enron Towers.

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I don't understand why a net absorption of 400,000 sf of office space is a death knell to downtown.

From the way the Chronicle talks about it, you'd think it was the end. I didn't realize they were moving into the Enron building. I would've researched it more, but I got busy and I just saw it in the headline this morning.

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That was one of two highly inaccurate and irresponsible headlines in the Chronicle JUST TODAY. I thought that paper was getting better, but it seems to be becoming more and more of a joke. and Nancy Sarnoff seems to have been infected a bit by the "all negative news all the time" malady of Ralph Bivins and much of the rest of the Chronicle.

As others have noted, the second part of the headline: "loses biggest tenant" was NOT news.

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From the way the Chronicle talks about it, you'd think it was the end. I didn't realize they were moving into the Enron building. I would've researched it more, but I got busy and I just saw it in the headline this morning.

I agree that the headline sounded gloomy. They apparently just assumed everyone knew about the previous move.

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I thought it was common knowledge that ChevronTexaco wanted greater and more modern office space, which is why they decided to purchase 1100 Smith Street in the first place. Nothing about this is shocking. Heritage loses a tenant (A tenant, I stress) and DT sees an extra absorption of 400,000 square feet of space overall.

If anything, that's an overall WIN for downtown.

I suspect some people also missed the part about El Paso consolidating office space that it had in Greenway Plaza with space it already has in DT, meaning another win for DT office space absorption.

LOL! The initial panic-first reaction entertains again!

Breathe.

Relax.

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