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William Cody Designed Home In Missouri City


Willowisp

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http://www.fortbendstar.com/110707/n_Homeo...20lose%20it.htm

The house is at 3033 Hampton Drive Missouri City. As I understand it, it was built in 1957 and is incredible. I'd love to see pictures. Actually, I work not too far from there so maybe I'll go over and check it out, though the article makes me want to stay away.

Thanks to Fernando Brave and Stephen Fox for bringing this to Houston Mod's attention.

Jason

Link to William Cody mini-bio:

http://www.psmodcom.com/Architects%20Pages/WilliamCody.html

Edited by Willowisp
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Thanks for that picture. I went by there today and it's definitely a compound. You can't see much from the front and there's a locked gate. Around the side is a golf course or open area so I walked around there but never really saw much other than the burros and an old car and old bus.

I don't know if the house was ever published, but some of the Houston Mod people have been inside so I'm hoping to get a picture if they took one.

It seems like the city would benefit from taking/buying the property and making a new street out of it and then the back of the new houses would face that open area (golf course?) so it leads me to question their motive.

Jason

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  • 1 month later...
http://www.fortbendstar.com/110707/n_Homeo...20lose%20it.htm

The house is at 3033 Hampton Drive Missouri City. As I understand it, it was built in 1957 and is incredible. I'd love to see pictures. Actually, I work not too far from there so maybe I'll go over and check it out, though the article makes me want to stay away.

Thanks to Fernando Brave and Stephen Fox for bringing this to Houston Mod's attention.

Jason

Link to William Cody mini-bio:

http://www.psmodcom.com/Architects%20Pages/WilliamCody.html

It is incredible!! I wish I had my camera with me a few years ago when I hopped the fence and took a peek inside. No one was living there at the time, however, there were several pieces of furniture inside including a grand piano.

There is another thread about this house under Sugarland and the Southwest, The Robinson House in Quail Valley.

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  • 1 year later...
It is incredible!! I wish I had my camera with me a few years ago when I hopped the fence and took a peek inside. No one was living there at the time, however, there were several pieces of furniture inside including a grand piano.

There is another thread about this house under Sugarland and the Southwest, The Robinson House in Quail Valley.

This house will be looking for a buyer shortly. Here's some background from a message Houston Mod received this morning:

In July of 1954 a wealthy surgeon from River Oaks named Dr. Hampton

Robinson, Jr. started buying large tracts of land near the community

of DeWalt Texas. He was very well familiar with the area, as his

father was a cattleman and lifelong resident of Missouri City. His

mother was from the DeWalt family and had grown up in the old family

plantation house that was located just south of the DeWalt Cemetery.

Most of the land Dr. Robinson purchased was owned by descendants of

the Dew family, who was once headed by Dr. Hugh Dew, a physician.

However, Dr. Dew's main interest was not medicine, it was building

the Dew Brothers Company. During the course of many years in the early

1900's, he accumulated massive amounts of property in Fort Bend County

and used it for sugar cane, cotton, and cattle. Over the years the

land was divided and was passed on to his family. Two of the these

descendants that Dr. Robinson bought property from were Ruth Lalley

and Jesse Dew Agnew. His goal when buying the land was to acquire

".... enough acreage in the area for its future development by others

as a first class residential subdivision, with among other things,

recreational facilities, customary sized residential lots and

commercial reserves." When he purchased the property it was being used

primarily for ranching. After acquiring it, he continued the ranching

operation and also made many improvements. The first big one on his

newly proclaimed Robinson Farm was a Palm Springs, California inspired

mansion located on what is now Hampton Drive. This desert style house,

with its flat roof and expansive layout, was designed by modern

architect William F. Cody and completed in 1958. It took about 1.5

years to construct, with materials such as the stone exterior being

sourced as far away as Santa Maria, California. At the time it was

built, it was meant to serve only as a summer or weekend home. Other

improvements to the Robinson Farm included a massive tree planting.

About 1500 live oaks hand were hand dug from Pleak, Texas and planted

in 1961 and 1962. These oaks can be still found today following the

path of Hampton Drive. Dr. Robinson also constructed a small one story

house and a horse stable by the lake on what is now Thunderbird

Street. For many years the house was occupied by his brother, Joe

Robinson. As early as 1959, Dr. Robinson started meeting with

developers about the idea of developing a golf course on this

selective property. The first group was the Houston Golf Association,

along with their consultant - a former pro golfer and coach named

Henry Ransom. The second was a group of developers/investors led by

golfing legend Ben Hogan. Hogan and the investors even took a hayride

tour of the property during the mid 1960's, but the deal failed. It

made it all of the way to the final closing, but fine print was never

worked out and the agreement wasn't reached. The third party involved

James "Mac" MacNaughton and R.W. Carey, also known as Mac-Carey

Properties. After negotiating with Dr. Robinson, they finalized the

purchase of about 750 acres which was to become the new subdivision

of Quail Valley. In May 1969 they also bought out several other

smaller landowners including a Houston dentist named Mack Daughtery,

who had a 40 acre horse ranch and house at what is now Cartwright and

Oak Hill Drive. However, the family did not sell their home site and

barn, and the neighborhood was built around it. Mac-Carey also

purchased about 69 acres from Walter and Lillie Dew Brinkman. For

years the couple operated a large chicken egg farm along Oyster Creek,

close to what is now Quail Valley Middle School . At its peak, the

Brinkman Egg Farm was home to over 30,000 egg-laying chickens. Within

a few months of these transactions, Quail Valley became the first

master-planned community in Fort Bend County when the plat for the El

Dorado section of Quail Valley was approved by Missouri City on

October 16th, 1969.

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  • 8 months later...

Is there a way to buy just one issue without having to subscribe?

I haven't gotten mine yet, looking forward to it. Ben, do you have it, or do you just know what's going to be in it?

MissJanel, you used to be able to buy single copies at Brazos Bookstore; call 'em and ask. On the other hand, individual memberships to RDA are not very expensive and are IMHO, very much worth it for the access to lectures, home tours, and Cite.

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Thanks. I will check with Brazos when I am back in Houston in January.

I haven't gotten mine yet, looking forward to it. Ben, do you have it, or do you just know what's going to be in it?

MissJanel, you used to be able to buy single copies at Brazos Bookstore; call 'em and ask. On the other hand, individual memberships to RDA are not very expensive and are IMHO, very much worth it for the access to lectures, home tours, and Cite.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 years later...

Hello Houston Mod,

I realize I'm a bit late replying to this topic, but I'm 99.9% positive the house Cody designed

for the Robinsons in Missouri City(Quail Valley) is identical in design to the much acclaimed

"Jorgensen-Mavis" house on the Thunderbird Country Club golf course in Rancho Mirage.

Has anyone else noticed the striking similarities in these two Cody commissions?

Codyfan

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  • 6 months later...

Hello Houston Mod,

I realize I'm a bit late replying to this topic, but I'm 99.9% positive the house Cody designed

for the Robinsons in Missouri City(Quail Valley) is identical in design to the much acclaimed

"Jorgensen-Mavis" house on the Thunderbird Country Club golf course in Rancho Mirage.

Has anyone else noticed the striking similarities in these two Cody commissions?

Codyfan

That is correct. The home is on the 9th green near the Thunderbird Country Club. The address is 40-253 Club View Dr. If you have Google Earth you can compare the sky view to the Robinson home in Quail Valley. They look to be identical, from the exterior, at least.

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