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Latter Day Luxuries


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I know most of you remember "Full Service" gas stations where they'd check your tires and oil and clean your windshield while they were filling your tank - free (not the 38 cent a gallon gas)! But, some of you may remember getting eggs, butter, and milk delivered to your door from Westmoreland Dairy and their "all Jersey cows". They'd even bring ice cream!!

I remember Dad calling up the dealership and a salesman would come pick us all up for a new car test ride. In this case it was a new '56 Packard Clipper. The dealerships would send a car of your choice and a salesman. If you liked the car, you'd go back to the dealership and get the paperwork signed and drive your new car home that afternoon.

I dunno, maybe all of these were replaced by free WIFI Hotspots.

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If you have a relationship with a sales person, you can get similar service. Depends on the salesman though really.

I'd love to have the milk, eggs and such delivered. And I have stopped in to full service gas station down the street from me a couple times when I was hurting really bad, it was REALLY hot outside and I was in a suit or I was just feeling lazy. The gas was, on avg, prolly 50 cents more per gallon and you'd get attitude from the attendant (if he actually came out) and he won't check your tires, wash your windshield or check your fluids unless you ask. Tip is expected. And if you ask him to check your fluids, expect him to say you need something.

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All the dairies used to deliver. We lived in Lake Jackson where Westmoreland didn't deliver so we used either Carnation or Sanitary Farm Dairies which used to have the plant on West Gray. I remember the first time I saw a tanker truck that said 'milk' and I thought 'No, milk trucks look like this.'

Delivery to your stoop was actually a step down in service. My Dad's family operated one of a half dozen or so small family dairies serving the Heights in the 20s. The older children were awakened at 2am to help with the deliveries (there was a second round of deliveries in the afternoon) using a Model T pickup. Milk was taken in to the kitchen and placed directly in the ice box. Doors were not only unlocked, sometimes the only door on a house was a screen door.

My Grandfather kept his cows (Jerseys) on leased land on what was then called Yale Rd., an extension of Yale Street that is now Veterans-Memorial.

My Dad always preferred Carnation milk because of their cream-top bottles. He was raised on the milk of Jerseys which was very rich in butterfat and he didn't like homogenized milk so he'd always drink the pure cream off the top of the cream top bottles.

Edited by brucesw
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Amazing link to the milk delivery trucks, thanks. I remember milking the cows in the late afternoon and shipping it out the next morning up on the Arkansas farm. We had Holsteins. I remember Grand Dad cleaning the milking machines, but there were a few cows you had to hand-milk.

As far as personal service goes, I guess technology has its price on de-humanizing our society.

BTW that's the same Borden (Gail) that laid out the streets in Houston, was one of the first news printers, invented condensed milk, mayor of Galveston, etc....

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1. Grocery sacker taking your paper bagged groceries to your car. Seldom see any more.

2. Doctors visiting your home if someone was sick.

3. 5 hamburgers for one dollar

4. Free calendars at local pharmacies

5. Pretty elevator girl in depratment stores that ask which floor you want to go to or announce depts to occupants ie; "Haberdashery going down"

6. Teacher or principal of your childs elementary coming over to chit chat about school events (not your bad behavior)

7. Minister or father also visits your parents to speak of church activities.

8. Cant forget curb service at Drive-In restaurants by pretty carhops.

Wow, I could go on! Good old days for sure :P

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If you asked, the Carnation or Foremost milk truck guy would give you a paper hat or pen if thet had extras

1. Thats right and I recall Baird Bread paper hats being given but not sure where? They were flat and had the red/blue zig zag design.

mrsbairds.jpg

2. An actual person coming to your doorstep to collect for your newspaper subscription.

3. Girl Scout cookies being sold at your door (shocked if you could do these days)

4. Telephone booths with folding doors (except in these cases)

telephone-booth-stuffing.jpg

5. Actually having the whole family sitting all together at once for dinner each night? No distractions ie, cable TV, video games, pathetic, rude cell phones.

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Great thread. I remember most of the things you guys are talking about.

I also remember cloth diaper pick up and delivery. I lived in the country, and the diaper service would still come to our farm. What's funny/disgustiong was mom washing those nasty things in the toilet...LOl. Thank God for disposables.

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Great thread. I remember most of the things you guys are talking about.

I also remember cloth diaper pick up and delivery. I lived in the country, and the diaper service would still come to our farm. What's funny/disgustiong was mom washing those nasty things in the toilet...LOl. Thank God for disposables.

Remember them hanging on clotheslines all over.

Imagine what hell women also had to go through when washing ALL clothes. Check out the old washing machines where the clothes had to be hand fed into the rolling bar as you had to turn it to squeeze out water, etc. Pure back-breaking Hell. Actually there is so much women had to physically do before modern day appliances couldnt name them all. Whole other topic for sure.

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Mom says she still remembers her big brother having to crank up the motor of his Model T with that winding bar and the car would start up. You know just like they had to crank up the old Victrola's.

Now I know why people in the old photos looked so husky and strong, women too!

The down side was short life expectancy, yikes! :mellow:

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1. Grocery sacker taking your paper bagged groceries to your car. Seldom see any more.

Wow, I could go on! Good old days for sure :P

They still do that at food town in Pasadena, both of them. I work retail and more and more people expect you to carry there crap out. :(

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My mother remembered picking up wood chips when she was six (1933) in Texarkana to start the Monday fire under the outdoor cast iron washpot in which the sheets were boiled. I saw the same washpot in 1972, but it had flowers planted in it. :P

During WWII we were living a tiny rent house in Houston's East End and had no washing machine (no one had a dryer back then). My mother did the laundry in the back yard with 3 tubs and a washboard. A few times a year, she would light a wood fire under the wash pot and boil all the linens to get them extra white. Our laundry was dried on the clothesline. Getting it dry before it rained or was pooped on by birds was always a concern. At the end of the war. a washateria opened nearby and she took the laundry there to wash it, but it was her preference to dry it on the clothesline at home, weather permitting.

Nowadays, proponents of the green movement are urging us to go back to hanging laundry outside to dry. I must admit, no fabric softener can ever give linens the wonderful fresh smell they get from being dried in the sunshine.

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They still do that at food town in Pasadena, both of them. I work retail and more and more people expect you to carry there crap out. :(

No matter where you work in retail, the increasing lack of any kind of customer service is appalling, as is the attitude of many employees. Until quite recently, I worked retail, too.

Sackers at most grocery stores - even the Gulfgate HEB - will generally ask women if they need help with a carryout. In the more upscale neighborhoods, one still has a choice of paper or plastic bags and my sources tell me that the carryout tips run $1 - $2 per bag.

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1. Grocery sacker taking your paper bagged groceries to your car. Seldom see any more.

2. Doctors visiting your home if someone was sick.

3. 5 hamburgers for one dollar

4. Free calendars at local pharmacies

5. Pretty elevator girl in depratment stores that ask which floor you want to go to or announce depts to occupants ie; "Haberdashery going down"

6. Teacher or principal of your childs elementary coming over to chit chat about school events (not your bad behavior)

7. Minister or father also visits your parents to speak of church activities.

8. Cant forget curb service at Drive-In restaurants by pretty carhops.

Wow, I could go on! Good old days for sure :P

I guess one of things that make small town living so nice, we still have our groceries taken to our cars and if we leave our address, they will deliver free of charge. We still have carhops on skates at some local restaurants. Our pharmacies give us free calendars as does our banks and we always see the local teachers and ministers (fathers) at courthouse events for chats. We don't have elevator girls though. Also, we don't get 5 hamburgers for a dollar. One reason the grocery stores bring the groceries to your car, they don't want to have to round up the carts left all over the lots.

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Although I don't remember there being to many "elevator girls", I do remember elevator operators in the downtown stores. I always wondered who would want that job. Going up and down in a 4X6 box all day. It's a pretty useless job but definitely shows how important customer service was back in the old days.

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Although I don't remember there being to many "elevator girls", I do remember elevator operators in the downtown stores. I always wondered who would want that job. Going up and down in a 4X6 box all day. It's a pretty useless job but definitely shows how important customer service was back in the old days.

I must have been about 6-7 yrs old but do remember the pretty girls/elevator's at maybe Foley's and Penney's/Grant's downtown. They sometimes would politely ask What dept are you wanting? TOYS! I always whispered to mom. As you exited, they would say like "Enjoy shopping with us and I hope you come back". :P

Nowadays they would probably stay on their cell phone while ignoring you and slam the door on you as you exit.

What about the airports and airlines?

Most flights leaving Houston offered free cocktails and free meals. Thats really something long gone. Not even peanuts on most airlines. Your charged for everything. Fly the un-friendly skies? :lol:

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S and H Green Stamps!

Everytime you went to like Weingarten's or Piggly Wiggly, they would either give them to you or you bought them. I was about 6 yrs old when I started filling out my books so I could redeem for cash I think? For a kid it was like winning the lottery!$$$ :)

Clip from Wiki: When the customer had collected sufficient stamps and stuck them into Green Shield collectors books (a task often given to amuse children), :lol: the shopper could then claim valuable merchandise from a catalogue or local Green Shield shop.

See how they would advertise on the buildings below? I just do not see this kind of stuff any more.

green_stamps.jpg

western_5pw_1981.JPG

Edited by Vertigo58
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I'm going to bend this thread a wee bit. Silveratfox mentioned going to the "washeteria". I remember reading some time ago that "washeteria" was a Houston word, little used except for here. Other places use laundromat. The only other term I remembered from that list was the use of "bubbler" for drinking fountain in Wisconsin. I was going to Wisconsin the day after I read the article and it stuck with me.

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I'm going to bend this thread a wee bit. Silveratfox mentioned going to the "washeteria". I remember reading some time ago that "washeteria" was a Houston word, little used except for here. Other places use laundromat.

To go with the thread bend, a little article about laundromats/washaterias:

http://www.austinchronicle.com/mrpants/laundry.html

I didn't know that "laundromat" was a proprietary eponym/genericized trademark of Westinghouse.

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During WWII we were living a tiny rent house in Houston's East End and had no washing machine (no one had a dryer back then). My mother did the laundry in the back yard with 3 tubs and a washboard. A few times a year, she would light a wood fire under the wash pot and boil all the linens to get them extra white. Our laundry was dried on the clothesline. Getting it dry before it rained or was pooped on by birds was always a concern. At the end of the war. a washateria opened nearby and she took the laundry there to wash it, but it was her preference to dry it on the clothesline at home, weather permitting.

Nowadays, proponents of the green movement are urging us to go back to hanging laundry outside to dry. I must admit, no fabric softener can ever give linens the wonderful fresh smell they get from being dried in the sunshine.

I remember the big galvanized steel tubs - made great wading pools for us kids - but I'm not sure I ever saw my mother use them for anything other than a rinse or adding starch. I have a vague memory of one of those early washaterias where you paid someone else to wash your clothes because you weren't allowed to touch the machines. My clearest memories are of my mother's first washing machine, an upright model with electrically propelled agitator tub but hand operated clothes wringer and a built in scrub board, as I recall. I wonder how many HAIFers don't have any idea what a clothes wringer was? Yeah, clothes drying on the line and us kids running in and out of them playing cowboys and Indians, etc. And the dried clothes being sprinkled with water from a bowl before ironing because there was no such thing as a steam iron or spray bottle.

When the first coin operated washateria opened Mother was thrilled. She never had a problem with sitting there waiting on the clothes but still brought some of them home to dry on the line. She didn't even ask Dad to buy her a washer and dryer for home for a long time. And then there was drip-dry.

And the detergent your Mother used was ..... Dreft?, Rinso Blue? I think mine used Tide for ages but I'm not sure. And of course, Mrs. Wright's (?) Blueing to get the clothes white. There's an old thread here on HAIF about that.

I had a cousin, raised in Canada, just a few years older than me but already dead, who knew my Great-grandmother in the Upper Michigan Peninsula. He remembered her boiling the dishes, etc. after every meal. Kept a big cauldron on the stove for it.

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I guess one of things that make small town living so nice, we still have our groceries taken to our cars and if we leave our address, they will deliver free of charge. We still have carhops on skates at some local restaurants. Our pharmacies give us free calendars as does our banks and we always see the local teachers and ministers (fathers) at courthouse events for chats. We don't have elevator girls though. Also, we don't get 5 hamburgers for a dollar. One reason the grocery stores bring the groceries to your car, they don't want to have to round up the carts left all over the lots.

They nearly always ask if you want help with your groceries at the HEB I go to but I seldom see people take them up on it.

I recently stopped at Patek's in Shiner to pick up some Shiner dogs and saw a guy wheeling a basket with just one plastic bag in it out to the car for a lady and I thought 'Boy is she lazy.' But I came to find out they took the groceries to the car for everyone (I declined).

Last time I saw groceries being taken to the car regularly was at the Randall's I used to shop at 20 years ago by the teenaged sackers. It was The Flamingo Kid in SW Houston.

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I'm going to bend this thread a wee bit. Silveratfox mentioned going to the "washeteria". I remember reading some time ago that "washeteria" was a Houston word, little used except for here. Other places use laundromat.

Oh how embarrassingly true! I am a native Houstonian who lived in New York City for 13 years and once made the mistake of blurting out the word "washeteria" I was laughed at and mocked for days and called a hick! Never EVER again did I use the word washeteria. The word for me from that point on was "laundrymat"

Edited by EspersonBuildings
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275px-Launderette_sign_large.jpg

I remember this name too in the sixties anyway.

Did anyone ever notice that when newer (launderette's) were being built around Houston in the late 60's that the sign was placed upside down? It took me 40 years :blush: to realize that this was to make you think of clothes spinning around in the dryer or in the wash machine! Serious. I remember there was one built in our neighborhood and I wondered how the construction guys could make such a dumb mistake, but it wasn't an error. I tried to find a pic on google but no luck, guess I will have to snap one myself and place here.

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Thanks Vertigo! Yea, I remember that very well! And until NOW, never understood it. I think as a kid, of course, I asked and what I remember being told was it was done to atract attention.

It's one of those things that really screws with a kid's head. Kind of like the PlaysKool thing................. Hard enough being a kid learning to spell without confusing craph like this! :o

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Thanks Vertigo! Yea, I remember that very well! And until NOW, never understood it. I think as a kid, of course, I asked and what I remember being told was it was done to atract attention.

It's one of those things that really screws with a kid's head. Kind of like the PlaysKool thing................. Hard enough being a kid learning to spell without confusing craph like this! :o

I saw one just the other day! Sign still upside down and as an extra, there is a song The Pretenders made a while back called "Watching the Clothes Go Round". Yep, rock song about passing time in a Laundramat. Describes "the delicates" whipping around, etc. Pretty cool fast song actually.

One more luxury to add:

Gas stations used to give away Hot Wheels model cars for a tank fill up. I imagine around 1969-71? My brothers and I had quite a bunch of them. Of course we made them smash into each other and eventually burned em or something insane like that. (Blame it on Godzilla films).

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As for the milk, it was in a glass container with the paper cap or stopper in the top........................

I remember dropping those since they weighed a ton it seemed like to a 6-7 year old kid. Helluva mess too, big chards of glass and milk every where, not to mention a big whipping! Ouch! still smarts. Yes, they had a like metal snap top, so wierd it now seems. :ph34r::lol:

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As for the milk, it was in a glass container with the paper cap or stopper in the top........................

Yes, and it was probably "whole milk" too, with several inches of cream floating on top of the milk! My mother poured it off and used it in her coffee.

In the 1940's, Richter's Dairy delivered glass containers of milk, cream and cottage cheese to our back door 2 or 3 times a week. The milkman wore a white uniform and military officer style cap with a black bill. Those milk bottles had not only the paper stopper with a little tab to lift it, but also a heavy paper cap secured with a thin, soldered wire. My parents saved the paper caps and the wires "because they might come in handy some time"... Actually, my mother put some sort of bluish-green powdered "roach poison" in the caps and shoved them into kitchen cabinets and behind furniture.

Edited by silverartfox
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Here is a major day latter day luxury:

American Red Cross would give FREE swimming lessons to young children. All summer long. I think now you have to pay?

All us kids got our badges at local high school gyms. It was Beginner, Intermediate, Swimmer's and most prized "Life Guard". The test were tough but well worth it. As part of the final or test we had to swim around the pool for one hour. I can never forget that. You had to switch the type of swim every 10 minutes ie; stroke, butterfly, crawl.

Anyway that was one freebee that I can never forget. :)

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No matter where you work in retail, the increasing lack of any kind of customer service is appalling, as is the attitude of many employees. Until quite recently, I worked retail, too.

Sackers at most grocery stores - even the Gulfgate HEB - will generally ask women if they need help with a carryout. In the more upscale neighborhoods, one still has a choice of paper or plastic bags and my sources tell me that the carryout tips run $1 - $2 per bag.

$1-$2 per bag? Wow, I was ripped off when I used to be a grocery store "bagger". I would get about 75 cents or a $1 if I was lucky, and this was back in 1995.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Most Target stores had a small bakery as you checked out at the registers.

The cake decorators would be making their creations right in front of you. This was a luxury for mom's to let the kids (like us) watch as they checked out. One less pain for tired parents. I used to love seeing the bakers squeeze the various colored tubes of frosting into roses, etc on top of big wedding cakes. Holidays were best as the cupcakes had little plastic characters to amuse.

Free kiddie entertainment. :P

PS, newer stores have brought back the bakery but it was no comparison to the original tiny bakery.

Edited by Vertigo58
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  • 3 weeks later...

telephone-booth-stuffing.jpg

What was really great about these booths was once you closed the door, it was actually quite peaceful so you could have a decent conversation. I was watching a classic old film last night and remembered the quiteness you experinced while being able to turn around during the conversation and see all the outside commotion.

Even today as you get a call on your cell phone you have to scramble to get behind a wall or whatever. For better hearing.

Just couldn't beat a glass booth. :P

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We were at the Chik-fil-A in Pearland a couple of weeks ago and it was raining hard... an employee with an umbrella walked us out to our car!! I was totally shocked. That was lovely customer service.

No matter where you work in retail, the increasing lack of any kind of customer service is appalling, as is the attitude of many employees. Until quite recently, I worked retail, too.

Sackers at most grocery stores - even the Gulfgate HEB - will generally ask women if they need help with a carryout. In the more upscale neighborhoods, one still has a choice of paper or plastic bags and my sources tell me that the carryout tips run $1 - $2 per bag.

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We were at the Chik-fil-A in Pearland a couple of weeks ago and it was raining hard... an employee with an umbrella walked us out to our car!! I was totally shocked. That was lovely customer service.

I remember doing retail and had this couple I had helped, return to the store and ask for my manager. They proceeded to tell him what a great job I had done and they would be coming back based on this experience(!). They said "If you have the right to complain, you have the obligation to commend". That was over 30 years ago and I've never forgotten that experience.

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HEB and Walmart are starting to slack off on common customer service tasks. On at least 3 recent visits, after checking out the cashier expects you to sack the items, grab the sacked groceries and place in your cart. This is really a management issue as one cashier said she had no one to help her ie; a sacker. The customer has to be the sacker.

Next you will have to step behind the counter and ring yourself up. Put your hand in the drawer and make off like a bandit. Love it. >:)

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i don't think i've ever seen anyone use Walmart and customer service in the same sentence. :D

i will say that HEB in clr lake has hand wipes where you pick up the carts. i do like that.

I think the handwipes are common now...even the Kroger on Bellfort has them...you know to wipe off fingerprints from things. :P

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I think the handwipes are common now...even the Kroger on Bellfort has them...you know to wipe off fingerprints from things. :P

i was at a party a few weeks ago and a friend from high school mentioned this kroger....she said she used to call it the black kroger and the one on polk the mexican kroger. LOL

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I remember the big galvanized steel tubs - made great wading pools for us kids - but I'm not sure I ever saw my mother use them for anything other than a rinse or adding starch. I have a vague memory of one of those early washaterias where you paid someone else to wash your clothes because you weren't allowed to touch the machines. My clearest memories are of my mother's first washing machine, an upright model with electrically propelled agitator tub but hand operated clothes wringer and a built in scrub board, as I recall. I wonder how many HAIFers don't have any idea what a clothes wringer was? Yeah, clothes drying on the line and us kids running in and out of them playing cowboys and Indians, etc. And the dried clothes being sprinkled with water from a bowl before ironing because there was no such thing as a steam iron or spray bottle.

My mother lived on a farm in Ok in the 30's-40's-50's. Back in the 30's and maybe

early 40's they had a gasoline powered washing machine. I don't think they had electricity

until the 40's, as they were one of the last in that area to be hooked up.

I'm not sure what brand it was.

You can see a few old machines here..

http://www.oldewash.com/articles/lives.htm

A few gas powered washing machines in action..

MK

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HEB and Walmart are starting to slack off on common customer service tasks. On at least 3 recent visits, after checking out the cashier expects you to sack the items, grab the sacked groceries and place in your cart. This is really a management issue as one cashier said she had no one to help her ie; a sacker. The customer has to be the sacker.

Next you will have to step behind the counter and ring yourself up. Put your hand in the drawer and make off like a bandit. Love it. >:)

I ran into this problem a couple of days ago. I brought my little basket of groceries to the checkout and put it on the counter. The girl told me I had to empty the items onto the belt. I firmly, but politely, informed her that this is her job. When she refused I informed her that I had nothing to do for the rest of the day but stand at the counter and wait for her to complete her task, or if she liked, she could call the manager and I'd have him explain to her the concept of "customer service."

She unloaded the basket.

When I'm paying $4.99/gallon for milk and the store refuses to stock egg nog, you'd better believe I'm not unloading the basket.

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I ran into this problem a couple of days ago. I brought my little basket of groceries to the checkout and put it on the counter. The girl told me I had to empty the items onto the belt. I firmly, but politely, informed her that this is her job. When she refused I informed her that I had nothing to do for the rest of the day but stand at the counter and wait for her to complete her task, or if she liked, she could call the manager and I'd have him explain to her the concept of "customer service."

She unloaded the basket.

When I'm paying $4.99/gallon for milk and the store refuses to stock egg nog, you'd better believe I'm not unloading the basket.

I don;t see how it was the cashiers fault? Most people unload there own stuff. You should've talked to the manager first. I had someone argue "Customer is always right!" with me the other day...Neither company i have worked for have had that policy in the manual. I can't say i like people who belittle the low man on the totem pole very much. Also, for the fact i', paying 2.84 for gas you better believe i'm not pumping my own gas :P

Edited by foxmulder
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My mother lived on a farm in Ok in the 30's-40's-50's. Back in the 30's and maybe

early 40's they had a gasoline powered washing machine. I don't think they had electricity

until the 40's, as they were one of the last in that area to be hooked up.

I'm not sure what brand it was.

You can see a few old machines here..

http://www.oldewash.com/articles/lives.htm

A few gas powered washing machines in action..

MK

Coleman lanterns became famous almost overnight after coming out with an iron that didn't need a fireplace or electricity. It worked just like the lanterns in that you poured in "white gas" from a bottle and then pumped it up for an hour's use. It was cheap and a very small percentage of households had electricity after the turn of the century. BTW we now call this "camping".

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Coleman lanterns became famous almost overnight after coming out with an iron that didn't need a fireplace or electricity. It worked just like the lanterns in that you poured in "white gas" from a bottle and then pumped it up for an hour's use. It was cheap and a very small percentage of households had electricity after the turn of the century. BTW we now call this "camping".

I'm pretty sure they had one of those. They had lots of things that you probably

don't see too much of these days. As an example, they had a cream separator

in the kitchen or wherever. I've never even seen one myself.

But they used it most every day, and she mentioned that it had to be dismantled

and cleaned after every use. Sounds like a pain to me...

And of course, they had to milk all those cows every single day.

I think you became numb to it after a while. There is nothing like a big wet

burred tail swatting you in the face on a wet freezing morning. :/

There are many others stories. She wrote of a lot of them in a family history

and genealogical book she wrote a while back.

They had their own smokehouse, and ate various types of pork throughout the

year. At first you would be eating all the good stuff, hams, etc, but at the end

of the year before the next pork smokehouse refill, you would be getting down

to the dried out stuff.

They didn't eat much beef at all, unless my grandfather swapped for some

every once in a while. Another sort of strange thing.. They grew champion

turkeys, but actually ate few of them themselves. I forgot the reason why.

They ate a lot of chicken though I think.

The reason they were among the last to get power was due to a personal/political

problem with the guy that ran the program.

In his previous job, he worked at the school board, which my grandfather was

also on. For some reason, he either fired the guy, or caused him to lose his

job. I forgot the reason, and would need a refresh from the book.

Anyway, guess what that guys next job was?

You guessed it. He ran the new power program. :(

It was no real surprise when my grandfather was one of the very last to get

power to that farm. :/ As a matter of fact, I don't think they got power

until that guy left, and someone else took over.

I never met that grandfather as he passed away about 2-3 years before

I was born. But I've got lots of stories about him. He was real good at

grafting pecan trees. Had quite a demand for it back then, and I think

he did pretty well. In the 20's, 30's, they did pretty well vs some others

in that area I think. In that period, they had the money to buy a

wind generator, new car, etc. The wind generator was used to charge

batteries, and I assume the system was DC. Mainly just for lights,

radio, etc. They also had a well which was a good ways from the house,

and they devised a way to pump that water using no power.

I forgot the name of the pumping system..

He raised state champion turkeys.

They said he had no qualms about taking the back seat out of the

family car, and throwing a calf or two in the back to haul it off somewhere. :/

Life was for sure different on a farm in the early 20th century vs

what most city dwellers are used to.

MK

Edited by nm5k
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Take a look at Car commercials of the past. They were far better than today IMO. Normally had a pretty/beautiful girl showing off the car. Camera panned across the interior as voice-over decribed great new features.

These days all they do is say the name of the new auto and your lucky if you see it going about 200 miles an hour along the beach. As if you can do that here in Houston? :wacko: You would get plenty of citations and be a killing machine. Be sure to pay attention to next TV commercial. They seldom show interior, etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFXEps2KMJg

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During WWII we were living a tiny rent house in Houston's East End and had no washing machine (no one had a dryer back then). My mother did the laundry in the back yard with 3 tubs and a washboard. A few times a year, she would light a wood fire under the wash pot and boil all the linens to get them extra white. Our laundry was dried on the clothesline. Getting it dry before it rained or was pooped on by birds was always a concern. At the end of the war. a washateria opened nearby and she took the laundry there to wash it, but it was her preference to dry it on the clothesline at home, weather permitting.

Nowadays, proponents of the green movement are urging us to go back to hanging laundry outside to dry. I must admit, no fabric softener can ever give linens the wonderful fresh smell they get from being dried in the sunshine.

My mom used to hang dry our clothes sometimes. I thought the clothes came out smelling funny.

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Those of you fro the Bryan College Station area will remember Leon Sevcik's Texaco. It was and is one of the last full service station you'll find that still checks your tires, and oil, the whole deal just like the good ole days.

leon.jpg

R.I.P. Leon my dear friend, I'll burn no daylight until we meet again (because I know you will be watching me!).

Leon has passed but his son Patrick still provides the same service that his dad did for almost 40 years. It's a Shell station now, but still full service and an honest place you can still take your vehicle to. There are a dozen employees there that have worked there for 20 years or more. It's really a throw back in time.

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Free Karate class lessons at some or all YMCA's.

There was a YMCA on Broadway (I think) on East End of DT. We attended classes for that summer. Far as I know they were free, unheard of these days right? Most of the kids were about 10-12 yrs of age, this was around 1972-73. The current Karate film craze helped fuel the interest in becoming your own Bruce Lee.

A true later day luxury-self defense! :D

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