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Olympics in Houston


pm91

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Houston is easily good enough to host an Olympics.

The problem is that the competing cities were better, and the IOC isn't looking for "good enough."

I'm not sure how you overcome that obstacle.

1.Improve and expand the bus and rail service

2.Let people see Houston as a place for not only business, but also for leisure

3.Clean and beatify the city (air,homeless,trash,trees/flowers etc.)

This could help, build a couple of iconic skyscrapers of course one would have to be a super tall. Its just an idea so please dont rip it to pieces.

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The only thing stopping Houston is its ugliness. That is what the IOC said.

Yes, but also I think they want to have the Olympics in "tier 1" type cities such as London, Paris, etc. That comes from the perception that the Atlanta Olympics were somewhat a failure and that Atlanta wasn't a global enough place to host. Houston certainly could support the mix of facilities to host, however.

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Improve and expand the bus and rail service

Houston has almost no public transportation. The busses are for residents. That system would fail under the strain of hundreds of thousands of visitors that would be here over the course of several weeks.

The rail system consists of The Superbowl Train. It has served it's purpose already - it shuttled Superbowl visitors back and forth between the Superbowl and the downtown hotels and restaurants.

If Houston were to even come close to having a chance, real-world mass transit would have to be in place and fully functioning - able to handle the load without delays - usable to the thousands of visitors from around the world. Not just short lines to and from downtown or the Galleria.

They could start with two lines going to and from the airports - where all the visitors would be coming from.

Clean and beatify the city (air,homeless,trash,trees/flowers etc.)

The litter here is shocking. People seem to think nothing of throwing trash out of their cars.

The other stuff seems to be ok - or at least being worked on. Many freeway areas are now being re-worked into landscaped areas as opposed to acres of paved embankments. 59 between Shepherd and downtown looks a million times better than it used to. Same for parts of 288 near downtown. That kind of improvement does wonders for a city's look and feel. For the residents as well as the visitors.

It may happen, but it's going to be a while. As someone else mentioned already, I think Atlanta really hurt the chances for future, non-international cities to be considered.

Edited by Dalton Russell
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Atlanta certainly set a bad precedent. But my understanding is that they want the Summer Olympics actually in the *summer*, which is mighty unpleasant here, both for the competitors and the spectators (even Sydney, in the southern hemisphere with reversed seasons, only got a delay until late Sept - their early spring). If we could defer to say, October, it could be very nice - but not June thru Sept.

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Houston has almost no public transportation. The busses are for residents. That system would fail under the strain of hundreds of thousands of visitors that would be here over the course of several weeks.

The rail system consists of The Superbowl Train. It has served it's purpose already - it shuttled Superbowl visitors back and forth between the Superbowl and the downtown hotels and restaurants.

If Houston were to even come close to having a chance, real-world mass transit would have to be in place and fully functioning - able to handle the load without delays - usable to the thousands of visitors from around the world. Not just short lines to and from downtown or the Galleria.

They could start with two lines going to and from the airports - where all the visitors would be coming from.

LOL. the first two sentences had me ROTFL. so you're suggesting that that we build public transportation for visitors only? A public transportation system is built to support residents of the city primarily, at least those that i'm familar with.

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so you're suggesting that that we build public transportation for visitors only?

Obviously not.

I'm suggesting that the lack of an existing, substancial, mass transit system (rail) that could handle an influx of hundreds of thousands of visitors is one of the reasons this city is often overlooked.

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Houston should forget the Olympics. Summers are too hot and humid. All southern cities are too hot and humid to be attactive to the OIC. One of these days, mass transit will occur in Houston in spite of itself, and then many more things will be possible. One of the pitfalls of having so many different cultures in a city, is that in third world countries most individuals don't care about their environment and they bring that mentality to Houston. Schools must teach the youngest of them all about the importance of keeping their city clean. It has to begin early, then believe it or not, the kids will police the parents. I have seen it happen. Just my thoughts on the subject.

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Obviously not.

I'm suggesting that the lack of an existing, substancial, mass transit system (rail) that could handle an influx of hundreds of thousands of visitors is one of the reasons this city is often overlooked.

so a substantial mass transportation system consists of rail, not buses. :huh:

Edited by musicman
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Houston has almost no public transportation. The busses are for residents. That system would fail under the strain of hundreds of thousands of visitors that would be here over the course of several weeks.

We seemed to get along surprisingly well in September and October of 2005.

Infrastructure and facilities are our strong points. The Olympic committee mentioned that distinctly. It was the intangible aspects that killed our chances. And frankly, I'd rather that we not even bother to go after Olympics. Not only does it place a large financial burden on our residents, but where's the long-term benefit? Look at Atlanta...how was it made a better city?

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so a substantial mass transportation system consists of rail, not buses. :huh:

1. What do you think a substantial mass transportation system consist of?

2. Do you think the City's transportation system would be better off with rail lines that served both of Houston's airports, allowing passengers to take a train ride downtown?

Edited by 713 To 214
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1. What do you think a substantial mass transportation system consist of?

2. Do you think the City's transportation system would be better off with rail lines that served both of Houston's airports, allowing passengers to take a train ride downtown?

a transit system is a combination of things, not just rail.

at this point, the ridership numbers wrt the money spent would be way off kilter i.e. it would benefit few. Currently there is an express bus to both hobby and IAH. i've only used the IAH one and it worked fine.

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at this point, the ridership numbers wrt the money spent would be way off kilter i.e. it would benefit few. Currently there is an express bus to both hobby and IAH. i've only used the IAH one and it worked fine.

The Houston Airport System served more than 44.8 million passengers in 2004. It is the 4th-largest multi-airport system in the U.S. and the 6th-largest in the world. Bush Intercontinental is the world's 12th-busiest airport.

Source: Houston Airport System

I find your statement really hard to believe.

Edited by 713 To 214
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We seemed to get along surprisingly well in September and October of 2005.

Not even remotely similar to the stresses the Olympics places on a city's infrastructure and resources.

Here's an article on how a city is affected by being the global stage for several weeks and the amount of work that goes into it.

Atlanta Olympics article

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I'd rather see the city go after more Superbowls than the Olympics. But whatever happens, the city has to do something with I-45. Most people coming from the airports end up on 45, and well, if that is there first impression of the city, it won't be a good one. That is one butt ugly stretch of freeway. I'd like to see the portion of 45 between Bush Intercontinental and 610 tunneled, just put it underground, then un-tunnel it (I don't know the correct terminology) near downtown, so people come out of the tunnel, and the bam, the giant Houston skyline is right there, I think that would be cool. But I know that would never happen, it would probably cost 3.7 trillion dollars. So maybe do it at least like the Southwest freeway near Shephard, that's nice.

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The Houston Airport System served more than 44.8 million passengers in 2004. It is the 4th-largest multi-airport system in the U.S. and the 6th-largest in the world. Bush Intercontinental is the world's 12th-busiest airport.

Source: Houston Airport System

I find your statement really hard to believe.

Yeah, I don't like musicman's statement either. I'd prefer it if it were changed to "it'd benefit a whole lot of people, but not very much." And I'd like to suggest a corollary that goes "Screw visitors--it'd be a burden to millions of taxpayers that actually live here."

We'd probably be better off subsidizing rental cars for our visitors, if it really is so important that they think highly of us. Me personally, I don't care what they think.

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The Houston Airport System served more than 44.8 million passengers in 2004. It is the 4th-largest multi-airport system in the U.S. and the 6th-largest in the world. Bush Intercontinental is the world's 12th-busiest airport.

Source: Houston Airport System

I find your statement really hard to believe.

i agree with your statement...the airport system serves millions of passengers. you've made a leap to assume they'd ride public transportation. so in dallas all the passengers that arrive at the airport ride public transportation? will you claim MOST of the passengers ride public transportation?

Edited by musicman
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i agree with your statement...the airport system serves millions of passengers. you've made a leap to assume they'd ride public transportation. so in dallas all the passengers that arrive at the airport ride public transportation? will you claim MOST of the passengers ride public transportation?

Let's play the numbers. . .shall we? If only 10% of the passenger traffic coming through the HAS took public transportation, then that would be 4.48 million people annually using the trains/buses (based upon 2004 numbers). Do you think that 10% is an unreasonable number to take advantage of public transportation? If so, why? Please provide sources or some type of reference information this time. Thanks in advance.

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ok the weather thing about it being too hot and humid isnt a factor. athens when they had it i remeber it being 96 and humid there like the whole time. and beijing, thier weather surprisingly enough is similar to ours. i have grandparents that live and work there for over a year now and they say summer is prettty much the same there as it is here and winter is a little bit colder than here. weather isnt a factor for the summer olympics..

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Let's play the numbers. . .shall we? If only 10% of the passenger traffic coming through the HAS took public transportation, then that would be 4.48 million people annually using the trains/buses (based upon 2004 numbers). Do you think that 10% is an unreasonable number to take advantage of public transportation? If so, why? Please provide sources or some type of reference information this time. Thanks in advance.

Even if 4.48 million riders were generated by the Houston Airport System, that would only amount to about 12,600 riders per day, and it would require a significant expansion of our rail system both to the north and the southeast to obtain even that.

Why bother with such a massive investment when express bus routes are quite possibly faster and can provide direct service to a greater number of locations in our region, all while requiring basically no up-front capital costs? It just doesn't make sense.

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Let's play the numbers. . .shall we? If only 10% of the passenger traffic coming through the HAS took public transportation, then that would be 4.48 million people annually using the trains/buses (based upon 2004 numbers). Do you think that 10% is an unreasonable number to take advantage of public transportation? If so, why? Please provide sources or some type of reference information this time. Thanks in advance.

so you want me to provide references for YOUR proposal? :blink:

at 12300/day, this is less passengers than are expected on the north line (13.9k) which METRO has changed to BRT because the lower ridership won't likely gain LRT funding. extending this to IAH will certainly make any proposal too costly and not likely to gain funding.

Edited by musicman
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Let's play the numbers. . .shall we? If only 10% of the passenger traffic coming through the HAS took public transportation, then that would be 4.48 million people annually using the trains/buses (based upon 2004 numbers). Do you think that 10% is an unreasonable number to take advantage of public transportation? If so, why? Please provide sources or some type of reference information this time. Thanks in advance.

Keep working those numbers. As you surely know, at Hobby and even more so at Bush Intercontinental, a substantial portion of that 44.8 million is NOT origin and destination traffic, meaning they are just catching a connecting flight. Those people are not going to care about mass transit into downtown Houston, no matter how nice or convenient it is. I don't have the numbers at hand, but someone can probably find them.

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houston has attempted to get the olympics twice. why doesnt it get very far in the race? i think the oylmpics would do great here. any idea why the commitee thinks it wouldnt?

Probably because we don't have any mountains nearby and it hardly ever snows.

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ugly, flat, dirty? who knows

The ugly truth about Houston

By DANIEL B. BARNUM

"After all the tours and visits to the proposed venues and other sites, on the last night of the Selection Team's final visit, we were sitting in a club together, chatting about Houston and what they had seen. I turned to the team member beside me and gently asked, `Well, what are Houston's chances to make the cut?' He looked directly at me, and without a pause, said, `Not a chance!' To my surprise and shock, he said, `Look, you have a great offer, among the best, and you have really great venues, a good financial plan; all that stuff's great. But, you don't have a chance because Houston is so ugly! The freeways are ugly, the major streets are ugly, the billboards are ugly, and we can't bring the world to all this ugliness!' "

This statement was made by a member of the Houston Olympic 2012 Host Committee. In spite of a wonderful plan, great venues and a well thought out presentation, we missed out on a chance for the Olympics in 2012 because Houston is ugly!

Now, in less than six months, the Super Bowl community will be descending on Houston, and we are finally waking up to the fact that much of our city is, in fact, ugly. ("See ugly? Leaders see the blight/Freeway landscaping part of Super Bowl plan," July 20, Page One). Why does it take a Super Bowl to wake us from our slumber? Can't we see the ugliness around us every day? Are we forever condemned to being this way?

....

In the details of the building and rebuilding of the highways, streets and sidewalks around Houston, the details are mostly awful. Look at the I-10/West Belt interchange -- it's ugly. Drive out Westheimer from Chimney Rock to Highway 6, or take I-45 north to the North Belt and just try not to be offended by the ugliness that lines these roadways. Is this the Houston we want to show the world?

.....

Edited by webdude
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While it is true that many of the 44.8 million passengers are just making connections, Houston is a large O & D city.

Additionally, we are forgetting how many airport and airline employees might want to use the rail to get to work. Continental and Southwest have thousands of pilots, gate agents, flight attendants, mechanics, etc... who would probably love to not have to pay to park at the airport. Then you throw in the janitors, the food/retail workers, FAA folks, freight folks, etc... and you are looking at two huge employment centers.

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While it is true that many of the 44.8 million passengers are just making connections, Houston is a large O & D city.

Additionally, we are forgetting how many airport and airline employees might want to use the rail to get to work. Continental and Southwest have thousands of pilots, gate agents, flight attendants, mechanics, etc... who would probably love to not have to pay to park at the airport. Then you throw in the janitors, the food/retail workers, FAA folks, freight folks, etc... and you are looking at two huge employment centers.

Anyone know ridership numbers at the MARTA station at ATL? Found them. MARTA claims an average weekday ridership at the airport station of 17,000. Not bad. But assuming that Houston has similar O&D traffic (and that should be a fair assumption), Houston would have to build rail to two airports (one of which is substantially further from the center of town than is ATL) to have access to similar numbers of passengers.

Don't misunderstand. I would love to have rail to both airports. Loving the idea, however, does not necessarily make it financially feasible. Right now, I think the numbers who take the "express" buses to the airports are very very low. Of course, that's not really a good test because (a) they are not actually"express" by any stretch of the imagination, (B) they seem to do everything they can to keep them a secret, and © the illogical, but well-known, rail bias. In any case, before spending a gajillion dollars getting rail to the airports, I would really like to see them make a serious effort to implement and market a true express bus servicew

Edited by Houston19514
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While it is true that many of the 44.8 million passengers are just making connections, Houston is a large O & D city.

Additionally, we are forgetting how many airport and airline employees might want to use the rail to get to work. Continental and Southwest have thousands of pilots, gate agents, flight attendants, mechanics, etc... who would probably love to not have to pay to park at the airport. Then you throw in the janitors, the food/retail workers, FAA folks, freight folks, etc... and you are looking at two huge employment centers.

but their location won't make transit an option for most. and even once you get to the airport, facilities are spread out so a stop at the terminal will only be an option for a portion of the employees you mentioned.

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Sometimes when a place is your home, it is easy to forget how it appears to others from out of town. When I left Houston and moved to southern California I realized that everything looked so neat and manicured. Not that there wasn't rundown areas, but even the worse apartment complexes had their grass trimmed and edged and the shrubbery trimmed. I returned to Houston to visit and noticed that even the large expensive homes let their grass run away with itself. It doesn't cost very much to hire gardeners and landscape people. The city needs to do this and individuals need to do this. And, it's like when you have a nice clean house, the whole place is more appealing. Like always, this is just my opinion.

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Moni, do you suppose that the fact that San Diego, Los Angeles, and Demming, New Mexico all receive from 9 to 14 inches of annual rainfall....compared to Houston's 52 inches....might have anything to do with untrimmed grass? I realize that you do not live here anymore, and you may not recall what sub-tropical moisture does to plants, but let me tell you. The reason the rain forests have so much growth is that they get so much rain. Same applies to Houston. I mowed my lawn 4 days ago, and it already looks shaggy.

Now, do you think that I am going to mow my grass every 4 days, or pay someone $30 every 4 days, just because those that live in a desert think it is not neatly trimmed? Hardly. I like my semi-tropical weather. I like my fast growing lawn and shrubs. But, I am not going to rush out to mow it more than once a week. This, by the way, is MY opinion.

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Moni, do you suppose that the fact that San Diego, Los Angeles, and Demming, New Mexico all receive from 9 to 14 inches of annual rainfall....compared to Houston's 52 inches....might have anything to do with untrimmed grass? I realize that you do not live here anymore, and you may not recall what sub-tropical moisture does to plants, but let me tell you. The reason the rain forests have so much growth is that they get so much rain. Same applies to Houston. I mowed my lawn 4 days ago, and it already looks shaggy.

Now, do you think that I am going to mow my grass every 4 days, or pay someone $30 every 4 days, just because those that live in a desert think it is not neatly trimmed? Hardly. I like my semi-tropical weather. I like my fast growing lawn and shrubs. But, I am not going to rush out to mow it more than once a week. This, by the way, is MY opinion.

No kidding. My wife gets upset because the lawn looks like hell four days after I cut it and wants me to do it again. I told her it can be 18 inches tall, but NO WAY IN HELL am I going to cut more than once a week, on principle alone.

By the way, Red, VERY well put.

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Of course you all are right. I understand the rain and also the flooding problem. When I lived in Houston, we kept our yard nice as did all our neighbors because it was a priority. Edging the lawn and the areas along the sidewalks, just makes a place look nice. Cutting grass once a week should be enough but letting it ramble over driveways and sidewalks just looks tacky.

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Obviously not.

I'm suggesting that the lack of an existing, substancial, mass transit system (rail) that could handle an influx of hundreds of thousands of visitors is one of the reasons this city is often overlooked.

I agree with you 100%. This is probably the real reason Houston will never get an Olympics game. Until they do, Houston can keep dreaming.

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We do not have another chance for years to come and I imagine more houstonians adapting to mass transit as we grow. I mean if we hosted the super bowl again this year think what out of towner's would think. H-TOWN changed alot with New freeways toll roads, and more light rail and brt stops. I believe we will have an extensive system(mass transit) by the time if we even our considered a finalist for Olympics. if ATL can do it we know Houston could do it.

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We do not have another chance for years to come and I imagine more houstonians adapting to mass transit as we grow. I mean if we hosted the super bowl again this year think what out of towner's would think. H-TOWN changed alot with New freeways toll roads, and more light rail and brt stops. I believe we will have an extensive system(mass transit) by the time if we even our considered a finalist for Olympics. if ATL can do it we know Houston could do it.

During the Superbowl, many out of towners were willing to pay thousands of dollars to rent out apartments, condos, etc, near Reliant center because they knew traveling to the stadium would be a mess during the superbowl. My friend lives in an apartment complex near Reliant and told me during the superbowl week, Janet Jackson's posse lived in his complex. Jermaine Dupree was also living there. F few residents rented out their apartments for like 8-9k during the weekend.

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I think the Olympics increased Atlanta's visibility some, and the Hartsfield atrium is AMAZING! Hartsfield is a hassle, but it's easily one of the most (if not THE most) beautiful airports around. At least they have the Olympics to thank for that as well as the Braves' new stadium.

I don't know how many of you went to Atlanta during the Olympics, but I can tell you that the entire region was dressed up. Atlanta was dressed up the most, of course, but other areas got in on the act. Alabama had metric road signs/kilometer markers, for example.

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Since the anti-River Oaks Center preservation crowd apparently feels that any and all visitors would never want to see classic modern architecture, but will hardly be able to get off the plane fast enough to stare with wonder and awe at the new Barnes & Noble, maybe all mass transit lines should radiate from there....

/sarcasm off/

I agree about Atlanta and Hartsfield Airport, but yikes, it was big!! 15-minute walk to the rental cars, which I didn't even need because MARTA was so efficient.

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1.Improve and expand the bus and rail service

2.Let people see Houston as a place for not only business, but also for leisure

3.Clean and beatify the city (air,homeless,trash,trees/flowers etc.)

This could help, build a couple of iconic skyscrapers of course one would have to be a super tall. Its just an idea so please dont rip it to pieces.

We could spend billions of dollars building turning Houston into the garden spot of the south and building the finest Olympic facilities in history, but we will still never get the Olympics.

Houston summers are far too hot and humid for three weeks of outdoor sports activity. Our healthiest teenage football players are dropping dead during summer football practices for goodness sakes. Can you imagine how many marathon runners would be dropping in the streets trying to run 26 miles around this town in the middle of a Houston summer?

And even without that problem, and despite all the bucks spent on beautifying the town, the Olympics could still be washed away by a tropical storm or Hurricane. It could happen. The Olympics just aren't going to happen here.

I've believed for a long time that some clear-eyed people in Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Dallas and other cities should get together and promote "The Texas Olympics".

The entire state could pitch in and work together to build an Olympic stadium with all kinds of facilities and an Olympic village somewhere several hundred miles inland, away from the coast where the heat and humidity aren't so oppressive.

We could also spread the events out at different venues around the state. Open up the Astrodome and Reliant Park for indoor events like gymnastics. Put basketball in Toyota Center. Have some track and field events at Kyle Field in College Station or Memorial Stadium in Austin. Texas and A&M both have very good facilities for swimming and diving events.

I honestly think it could happen if some truly determined and visionary people push it hard enough. The trick will be to let every town and every person in the state feel like they have a stake in it, and not let one town try to claim the Olympics as their own. I hope they get started soon because I'm getting on and I don't think I'll live to see it.

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I think the Olympics increased Atlanta's visibility some, and the Hartsfield atrium is AMAZING! Hartsfield is a hassle, but it's easily one of the most (if not THE most) beautiful airports around. At least they have the Olympics to thank for that as well as the Braves' new stadium.

I don't know how many of you went to Atlanta during the Olympics, but I can tell you that the entire region was dressed up. Atlanta was dressed up the most, of course, but other areas got in on the act. Alabama had metric road signs/kilometer markers, for example.

As much as I love Atlanta, I honestly don't think they deserved the Olympics...at least not then. They bought it really (look up IOC, Turner, and CNN).

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Pretend you're seeing Houston for the first time. Your first impression of Houston is not just UGLY but SCARY. The second thought is AVOID THIS PLACE and NEVER COME BACK.

It's a harsh assessment but Houston is an ugly place--physically, politically. Houston is not a place people return to without a huge pre-existing reason...like family or work. No one voluntarily chooses this city. The weather is the very least of its problems. Miami, Atlanta, Hong Kong etc., have similar weather...people LOVE those places. Even with mass transit in place, the ugliness remains.

There's just too few user-friendly areas in Houston.

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Pretend you're seeing Houston for the first time. Your first impression of Houston is not just UGLY but SCARY. The second thought is AVOID THIS PLACE and NEVER COME BACK. It's a harsh assessment but Houston is an ugly place--physically, politically.

I've lived here most of my sixty plus years and I absolutely agree. I can remember when Houston was a fun place to live and work, but then it started growing and expanding. Today, if you can't afford to live close-in where all the action is, Houston is just not a liveable city for you, and I'm including myself in that assessment. I would love to live somewhere other than the suburbs, but people live where they can afford to live, and that means my wife and I have to live 30 miles from downtown Houston.

Urban sprawl and the absence of a credible public transportation system are killing this city's urban life. I said "credible" transportation system. The one we have doesn't meet that definition.

Our local joke -- the METRO Park and Rides -- are no help whatsoever to people who don't work in downtown Houston. They only benefit people who work downtown 9 to 5. Work downtown outside those hours and you're SOL as far as METRO is concerned.

There was a time when I loved Houston and loved living here, but I haven't felt that way for a long time. I absolutely detest this city now. Our jobs are the only reason we continue living here. It's the only place we can make a decent living doing what we do, but that's going to change, very soon.

When I retire in three years, we will be able to live anywhere we want to live. My wife and I are going to get the hell out of this town and this part of the state, and the happiest day of our lives will be the day we see the Houston City Limits sign in our rear view mirror for the last time.

Edited by FilioScotia
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Urban sprawl and the absence of a credible public transportation system are killing this city's urban life. I said "credible" transportation system. The one we have doesn't meet that definition.

A reality that many here are unwilling to accept. . .from the energy companies that run this town. . .to City Hall. . .to the common man/woman on the street who is totally oblivious to how good others living in cities with dense urban environments, and "credible" public transportation, have it.

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I've lived here most of my sixty plus years and I absolutely agree. I can remember when Houston was a fun place to live and work, but then it started growing and expanding. Today, if you can't afford to live close-in where all the action is, Houston is just not a liveable city for you, and I'm including myself in that assessment. I would love to live somewhere other than the suburbs, but people live where they can afford to live, and that means my wife and I have to live 30 miles from downtown Houston.

I can understand what you mean about how it's not too much fun living 30 miles from downtown, and I know that the inner loop is more expensive than the suburbs, but it sure is cheap living near downtown compared to other major cities. Imagine how much a condo in downtown Manhattan, or San Francisico, or Chicago would cost compared to here?

My sister lives in an apartment in Manhattan with no windows, she has 2 roommates, and the bedrooms are the size of my walk in closet. The entire apartment couldn't be much more than 1000 square feet, no air conditioning, one bathroom, and a mini sized fridge. Her share of the rent is 3 times higher than my share of the rent here in the museum district. And I have a pool, free parking, a gym, and access to public transportation. While the transportation is not that extensive, at least takes me where I really need to go. Maybe I'm just lucky. I know not everybody in Houston has all of that.

Other cities might have a better urban life, more transportation, and less sprawl, but I have found that my little part of Houston is just as livable, and more affordable than other more glamorous cities.

Edited by Jax
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Houston summers are far too hot and humid for three weeks of outdoor sports activity. Our healthiest teenage football players are dropping dead during summer football practices for goodness sakes. Can you imagine how many marathon runners would be dropping in the streets trying to run 26 miles around this town in the middle of a Houston summer?

I think the weather is the weakest argument against a Houston Olympics.

Barcelona, and Athens are just as hot and humid as Houston.

Barcelona average July/August temperature: 77/84

Houston average July/August temperature: 82/83

And if you don't know the difference between an Olympic-class athlete and some high school football player, then you need to get out of the sun.

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I think the weather is the weakest argument against a Houston Olympics.

Barcelona, and Athens are just as hot and humid as Houston.

Barcelona average July/August temperature: 77/84

Houston average July/August temperature: 82/83

And if you don't know the difference between an Olympic-class athlete and some high school football player, then you need to get out of the sun.

I about pissed my pants laughing on this rebuttle, that was too funny.

The bottom line with the IOC is $$$$$$$$$. Always has and always will be. Whoever slips the most money under the table will get the gig. That's it plain and simple.

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