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Rice University Campus Developments


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The crane is up along Main St.  Once the Medistar/Greystar cranes go up as well it should make for some pretty good TMC skyline shots.  Not sure you can really capture all of the activity from a single vantage point, though

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http://www.houstonchronicle.com/entertainment/arts-theater/article/Rice-University-prepares-to-open-Moody-Center-for-9134531.php#photo-10736982

 

The Moody will host its first classes in January and open to the public in February.

 

Architect Michael Maltzan's two-story structure combines a substantial jumble of intersecting rectangles clad in charcoal-gray brick and a glass-walled first floor. That's a wild departure from Rice's many classically-inspired buildings.

 

Maltzan said the Moody's contemporary spirit reflects its programs. He admires the "very specific and historic context" of the Rice campus, where many buildings are covered in the same, rose-hued St. Joe brick, but said he wanted to make a building "related to its own time."

 

A magnesium oxide coating on the Moody's dark brick alters its color poetically as atmospheric conditions change - a nice echo, in solid form, of the changing light within James Turrell's monumental "Twilight Epiphany" skyspace nearby. The brick appears to be dark blue on clear days, silvery when the sky is overcast, and nearly black at night, setting off the lights visible through all that glass.

 

That transparency was key, opening a window to the activity inside and "welcoming everyone in," Weaver said.

Cut-outs in two of the building's corners hold steel sculptures inspired by Rice's lush tree canopy that will be iconic features. Weaver also reads the branching designs as starbursts of "radiating ideas."

 

The building's interior, designed around a central "open studio lab," is a microcosm of the campus's quadrangle-based clusters of academic buildings. Walking across quads is an essential part of the Rice experience, Maltzan said. "It's where some of the best collaboration happens."

 

The building's front door faces Stockton Street, so it's easy for the public to find. Classrooms and labs are concentrated at the back and upstairs, although Weaver also wants the lounges to be active. Even a flight of padded stairs will double as amphitheater-style seating for impromptu talks.

 

Covered arcades merge the Moody's indoor and outdoor activities. Weaver plans to project films on the west facade and activate the north side's triangular green lawn with events that could include student design competitions and outdoor sculpture exhibitions.

"It's fun to think about, figure it all out," she said.

 

Maltzan's design was nearly done when Weaver was hired last year, but she tweaked some details and squeezed in a small upstairs cafe - "so it's not an in-and-out building but a place where people will want to hang out."

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gorgeous_blue_glitter_text.gif

^^^ what a wonderful asset this cool arts facility is going to be for RICE U.

i can only just imagine the LED lighting effects that they may have in store for this great beauty.....

Edited by monarch
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It was reported today Rice is one of a handful of teams selected to make presentations to join the Big 12. Its extremely likely they don't get in, but kind of shocking to hear they're in the running considering they were never mentioned before.

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I suppose that having the brick on the upper floors and not the ground floor upends notions of "stability" and "permanence," thereby radically critiquing a culture that seeks to crush dissent (both internal and external) through use of material force and power. The gray brick and lack of detail, in contrast to the bright reddish hues and ornament on other campus buildings, challenges the appropriation of other and historical cultures by the dominant culture, providing students with a place of relief and oxygen amid a campus laden with the imposing incoherent forms of late capitalism.

 

Or something similar.

 

 

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I agree. They want a team that can sell tickets. Rice is lucky if 10,000 people attend one of their games. I will say with the new football complex Rice might be able to attract better players. Only problem Rice will insist they're players be able to read and write which puts them at a huge disadvantage with major schools in big conferences.

 

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7 hours ago, Houston19514 said:

/\  agreed Rice is unlikely to get in, but they were indeed mentioned before.  (Well, maybe not by our local "journalists", but I know I saw them on the list somewhere.)

Oh ok, I must have missed that. Thanks.

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5 hours ago, EllenOlenska said:

The school announced Monday that it will break ground in September on a new music and opera building designed by Allan Greenberg Architect LLC. 

http://www.chron.com/entertainment/arts-theater/article/Rice-to-break-ground-on-new-performing-arts-hall-10806079.php

This is ugly.  It reminds me of the Tower of London -- and it was a prison.

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15 hours ago, Subdude said:

Not neoclassic.  More neo-Romanesque would be my guess.

True. My bad, I was just trying to lump all the pre-war architectural styles into one umbrella term. Craftsmanship, detailing and ornamentation were truly amazing before the war. Almost every single building was built like a masterpiece back then. Even art-deco's simple lines and curves are something that I would love more of. I doubt that the styles will ever make a return, though.

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6 hours ago, Luminare said:

oh yeah lets not let a cool firm like Diller Scofidio & Renfro design this...I got a better idea guys. Lets get that one McMansion architect down the block.

Rice was definitely looking for a firm that could replicate the style of its older buildings. Allan Greenberg was the way to go. He is one of the leading figures in New Classical architecture, and his firm's previous works truly are beautiful.

http://www.allangreenberg.com/projects/dupont-hall/

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't want beef with anybody, but you could've at least looked this guy up before deriding him as a "McMansion architect'. How disgusting.

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I took this photo earlier in the month and never got around to posting it, but nobody else has provided updates so it's still a good 6 weeks more current than anything else out there.  This is the new parking garage and office building, mostly finished.  Not the greatest photo but I was just walking by, and this was the best view I could get from the side I was on:

 

GFtZQLG.jpg

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Rice University Campus Developments

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