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Samsoner

what has Pearland's flood history been like?

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I live very close to 518 and Main, and yesterday I saw Mykawa Road partially flooded, the small side streets off of North Main towards 288 flooded, and the ditches alongside 518 were half full.

I'm not scared or trippin' but I am concerned.

Thanks!

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I live very close to 518 and Main, and yesterday I saw Mykawa Road partially flooded, the small side streets off of North Main towards 288 flooded, and the ditches alongside 518 were half full.

I'm not scared or trippin' but I am concerned.

Thanks!

The older part of Pearland was built prior to there being detention requirements, and I wouldn't be surprised if stormwater sewers were in need of upgrades to accomodate new streets and impermiable surfaces feeding them.

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I live very close to 518 and Main, and yesterday I saw Mykawa Road partially flooded, the small side streets off of North Main towards 288 flooded, and the ditches alongside 518 were half full.

I'm not scared or trippin' but I am concerned.

Thanks!

like any area, some parts of pearland do flood

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I've heard that area around Mykawa and 518 is very prone to flooding. I believe one of the older neighborhoods there has flooding problems due to their low elevation compared to the surrounding neighborhoods.

After a few good rains, you'll probably learn which local roads are prone to the worst flooding and which are usually OK.

Ask some locals down there what roads to avoid during a flood.

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I live on the west side in SCR and didn't have any flood problems in the neighborhood or on Shadow Creek Parkway. I didn't travel down 518, so can't say about that, but there is a lot of construction on that side which will hopefully alleviate flood concerns. The big problem that I ran into during TS Erin was that 288 was flooded at 610 and my alternate route, FM 521, was also flooded in some parts. Ended up taking 35 South to the Beltway and didn't have any problems.

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During Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 all of the homes between Pearland and Alvin had water inside of them, most up to their roof tops. Mustang Bayou, Chocolate Bayou and Dickinson Bayou all came out of their banks and sort of merged together as one giant sheet flow. This was years before developers built all the subdivisions you know see. Another tropical event like that would be worse.

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During Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 all of the homes between Pearland and Alvin had water inside of them, most up to their roof tops. Mustang Bayou, Chocolate Bayou and Dickinson Bayou all came out of their banks and sort of merged together as one giant sheet flow. This was years before developers built all the subdivisions you know see. Another tropical event like that would be worse.

You left out the part where TS Claudette dropped 43 inches of rain in 24 hours, still the US single day rainfall record. Few communities could handle that amount of rain without flooding. Not saying that Pearland isn't flood prone, but Claudette, like Allison, was a historic rain event.

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During Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 all of the homes between Pearland and Alvin had water inside of them, most up to their roof tops. Mustang Bayou, Chocolate Bayou and Dickinson Bayou all came out of their banks and sort of merged together as one giant sheet flow. This was years before developers built all the subdivisions you know see. Another tropical event like that would be worse.

Another tropical storm like that would be very bad, but to say that it would be worse may be a stretch. Most of the development in that area since then has had to conform with flood control requirements. Not only must developers offset the impacts of land made impermiable and detain stormwater locally, but if they're building in an area within a flood plain, they have to mitigate that as well--meaning that they have to build up land under homes, taking additional soil from detention ponds and/or cutting streets deeper into the ground. This is a big part of the reason that nearly all of the new subdivisions in the Houston area start off barren and treeless.

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The big problem that I ran into during TS Erin was that 288 was flooded at 610

Please share where exactly in 288 ? At the intersection of 610 and 288, so that you could not get in to EITHER DIRECTION (West / East) of 610 ? Or it is before/after 288-610 intersection ?

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Please share where exactly in 288 ? At the intersection of 610 and 288, so that you could not get in to EITHER DIRECTION (West / East) of 610 ? Or it is before/after 288-610 intersection ?

it is south central houston (at the intersection of the 2). 610 itself was fine, 288 which is under the grade, flooded.

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