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Not sure when it started back up but it's definitely up and running again.  Hard to tell since this is a long exposure but you can clearly see it lit up here (shameless plug):   Williams Tower by Br

Vlog with drone footage at end    

Plug away. At least you don't make us click on the link to view the image like some people make us click their twitters. You know who you are.

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I don't get it, why would having access to the sky loby be a security risk? I'm pretty sure that if they wanted to fly and airplane into Williams Tower they can do it from outside of the sky lobby.

Yes, because we all know that flying airplanes into buildings is the only tactic that terrorists have ever used or will ever use, so that's the only thing we should defend against...

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Not to change the subject, but I'm curious how the idea of having the Williams/Transco Tower uptown came about in the first place, and how the architect came out with such a still-modern design over 30 years ago. Was the idea back then that Williams was going to attract more skyscrapers in the Uptown area, or the exact opposite?

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I don't get it, why would having access to the sky loby be a security risk? I'm pretty sure that if they wanted to fly and airplane into Williams Tower they can do it from outside of the sky lobby.

You have to think about other possibilities.

Remember, the IRA bombed the BT Tower in London by carrying a bomb up to the observation deck.

Security experts are paid to think of the possibilities, not just react to recent tragedies.

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You have to think about other possibilities.

Remember, the IRA bombed the BT Tower in London by carrying a bomb up to the observation deck.

Security experts are paid to think of the possibilities, not just react to recent tragedies.

Al Qeida and the IRA have different agendas. Al Qeida is not interested in bombing an observation deck, they are interested in attacking things that will get them the most television coverage worldwide, such as plane hijackings and the toppling of buildings and the mass murder of thousands of people. The so called security experts are pretty much a joke.

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Yes, because we all know that flying airplanes into buildings is the only tactic that terrorists have ever used or will ever use, so that's the only thing we should defend against...

While that is true, a bomb (at least one meant to take out the entire building) would be much more devastating in a lobby than in a skydeck. Just as an example, one of the reasons that the North tower was able to stand for almost 50 minutes longer than the South tower is because the South tower was hit much lower. Thus a greater load was put on the weakened supports. Not to mention the size of any device would be quite limited due to the fact you would have to get it all the way up. There is not much of a chance to stop someone willing to kill themselves if they just burst into the building. Also you could drive a truck or something of the sort into the bottom of the building or garage beneath it (1993 WTC bombing). You couldn't bring that up to an observation deck. Worst case scenario (besides a bomb) for an observation deck is if all the people there are taken hostage, or someone with a sniper rifle is able to secure it and then target people on the street. Even then the person would be easily picked off once they come to a window to start shooting.

The one advantage I see of closing observation decks is that you could restrict the number of random unknown people coming into the building.

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Last I heard (about February) it was still closed.

It is a shame that it is still closed. I used to love going up to the sky lobby to check out that view.

The only problem was that it was limited to the west only. There was a lot to see out there, but you were prevented from seeing the best views back towards downtown.

Hopefully security will improve and 'paranoia' will calm down and it will reopen to the public.

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Al Qeida and the IRA have different agendas. Al Qeida is not interested in bombing an observation deck, they are interested in attacking things that will get them the most television coverage worldwide, such as plane hijackings and the toppling of buildings and the mass murder of thousands of people. The so called security experts are pretty much a joke.

At no point did I say that the IRA and Al Qaida have similar agendas, so I'm not sure why you made that statement. They do (or rather did), however, have similar goals: Terror. And similar methods: Bombing.

Al Qaida has demonstrated that it is not merely interested in high-collateral targets such as you mention. Al Qaida agents have carried out thousands of attacks in Afghanistan and elsewhere that only had a few casualties. Again, their goal is terror, and if that can be achieved by the killing of one person, then one person is enough.

No one stated that the Williams Tower sky lobby was closed permanently because of Al Qaida. It was closed on September 11th as a precaution just like pretty much every other skyscraper in the world. Some skyscrapers have re-opened their observation decks. The owners of the Williams Tower decided against it. Perhaps it was because they took the opportunity to evaluate their ability to screen people versus the cost of doing so, and decided it just wasn't worth it. Maybe their insurance premiums wouldn't make it feasable. For you to call someone a "joke" doesn't fly. You have no knowledge of their methods or what was considered. You're just lashing out because you make assumption that lack either knowledge, imagination, or both. I suggest that in the future you think before you click the "Reply" button.

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At no point did I say that the IRA and Al Qaida have similar agendas, so I'm not sure why you made that statement. They do (or rather did), however, have similar goals: Terror. And similar methods: Bombing.

Al Qaida has demonstrated that it is not merely interested in high-collateral targets such as you mention. Al Qaida agents have carried out thousands of attacks in Afghanistan and elsewhere that only had a few casualties. Again, their goal is terror, and if that can be achieved by the killing of one person, then one person is enough.

No one stated that the Williams Tower sky lobby was closed permanently because of Al Qaida. It was closed on September 11th as a precaution just like pretty much every other skyscraper in the world. Some skyscrapers have re-opened their observation decks. The owners of the Williams Tower decided against it. Perhaps it was because they took the opportunity to evaluate their ability to screen people versus the cost of doing so, and decided it just wasn't worth it. Maybe their insurance premiums wouldn't make it feasable. For you to call someone a "joke" doesn't fly. You have no knowledge of their methods or what was considered. You're just lashing out because you make assumption that lack either knowledge, imagination, or both. I suggest that in the future you think before you click the "Reply" button.

Spending yrs in the military strategic planning arena......yes i do have inside knowlege of planning, and i stand by what i said...they are a joke!!!!!! So your suggestion to me to think is silly. Afghanistan attacks are on soft targets, its the only thing they can manage to do...small targets on a small scale......run back into hiding.....anything else and the US military will slay them to no end for it would require them to stick thier heads out of hiding a little longer. If soft targets were the goal here, theres more of them other than building observatories, and they rank on the same scale...minimal at best. Closure of the observation decks were and are a "knee jerk, symbolism over substance" reaction to the horror of 9-11. Al Qeida attacked us, not the IRA. The methods are different.

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Spending yrs in the military strategic planning arena......yes i do have inside knowlege of planning, and i stand by what i said...they are a joke!!!!!! So your suggestion to me to think is silly. Afghanistan attacks are on soft targets, its the only thing they can manage to do...small targets on a small scale......run back into hiding.....anything else and the US military will slay them to no end for it would require them to stick thier heads out of hiding a little longer. If soft targets were the goal here, theres more of them other than building observatories, and they rank on the same scale...minimal at best. Closure of the observation decks were and are a "knee jerk, symbolism over substance" reaction to the horror of 9-11. Al Qeida attacked us, not the IRA. The methods are different.

You state that you stand by your "joke" statement, but still haven't explained what their reasoning is and why it is a joke. So, answer the question. You imply that you know what went into the decision-making process. Please enlighten the rest of us.

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Thier reasoning is "typical knee jerk reaction".

You still haven't explained how you know their reaction is a knee-jerk reaction. Were you in the meeting when the decision was made? Did you read a transcript of the minutes? Do you know someone who was in the meeting? No, you're just making stuff up to be critical of people you don't know and have never met.

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You still haven't explained how you know their reaction is a knee-jerk reaction. Were you in the meeting when the decision was made? Did you read a transcript of the minutes? Do you know someone who was in the meeting? No, you're just making stuff up to be critical of people you don't know and have never met.

Closure of the observatories protects no one. It is smoke and mirrors...do something completely stupid and beneficial to know one in order to look good in front of cameras. Showing that you are doing something proactive to combat the terror threat....a show that has no teeth. Problem with that stupid move is, people will start to question it over time. They will question it because it makes no sense. Theres no need to sit in on any meetings, been there and done that on a level that you and most others will never know. Closing the observations decks was about as silly and knee jerk as stationing military troops at the nations airports. Symbolism over substance.

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Closing the observations decks was about as silly and knee jerk as stationing military troops at the nations airports. Symbolism over substance.

Actually, I'm kind of glad the military troops are/were stationed at the airports. The 9/11-type attacks had never been done before, no one would have ever thought of airplanes crashing into buildings.

Because, by blocking the main entrances to buildings with those concrete blocks, you eliminate the threat of truck/car bombs. By closing the observation deck, you eliminate the threat of a shoe or vest bomb. You can't have anti-aircraft guns on the buildings, so how do we stop a planes from being used as they were?

Secruity at the airport. You cut it at its source.

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the williams tower is not really known to folks outside of the houston area. houston folks come there to neck, commit suicide or sit atop of the parking garage with a high powered rifle. however, if al 'queda were to hit houston (which is a possibility), they would hit the refineries or the ship channel. plus williams isn't the only tower "locked down" since 9/11 but most office buildings have become inhabited by roaming packs of security officers. i think shutting down tall office towers immediately after 9/11 was a wise idea but after a couple of months, they should have eased up a bit. no matter where i go with my digi-cam, i always have some wary eyed

as for the national guard at the airport in the weeks after 9/11, not a bad idea and most countries do have heavily armed police stationed at airports.

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Not to change the subject, but I'm curious how the idea of having the Williams/Transco Tower uptown came about in the first place, and how the architect came out with such a still-modern design over 30 years ago. Was the idea back then that Williams was going to attract more skyscrapers in the Uptown area, or the exact opposite?

How dare you get back on topic! :D

I'm pretty sure the answer to all of your questions is 'yes'. That is, you're asking the right questions, and I have some answers, almost.

According to my authentic, original 1982 Transco Tower promotional poster, it's "A Project of Gerald D. Hines Interests and Transco Companies Inc." Gerald Hines was very much involved with the design of this building, and it's from his concepts that Johnson & Burgee developed the final design. Do not ask me to name my source; I read this somewhere about 20 years ago, and can't be expected to remember everything. But yeah. It was in a newspaper article from that time. Mr. Hines has always had a keen interest in and appreciation for architecture.

The team (Johnson, Burgee and Hines) wanted to do something audacious. Like George Mitchell, Hines had a vision that Houston would continue to expand and built accordingly; for the former it was The Woodlands, the latter Transco Tower. The inspiration for Transco, I'm told, is the lighthouse. It makes sense. A landmark to which people are drawn from vast distances. The rotating beacon atop Transco/Williams is a sly reference to that concept.

Rather than a literal interpretation of a lighthouse, Hines wanted an icon of urbanity. What better than the forms of Manhattan skyscrapers? Transco definately shows influences of the Empire State Building and especially the New York Daily News building (Raymond Hood):

175px-HughFerris1.jpg

Even the Transco promotional poster recalls the Hugh Ferriss rendering.

So yes. It was built to celebrate its site in a sea of nothingness; and its role as a beacon to which a city would eventually come has been realized. Its destiny has been fulfilled.

Was that too long winded?

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Actually, I'm kind of glad the military troops are/were stationed at the airports. The 9/11-type attacks had never been done before, no one would have ever thought of airplanes crashing into buildings.

Because, by blocking the main entrances to buildings with those concrete blocks, you eliminate the threat of truck/car bombs. By closing the observation deck, you eliminate the threat of a shoe or vest bomb. You can't have anti-aircraft guns on the buildings, so how do we stop a planes from being used as they were?

Secruity at the airport. You cut it at its source.

You are aware those troops didnt have live rounds, right? Symbolism over substance.

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In 1985, Transco commissioned a local press to do a book about the building. The result is the most visually stunning (and collectible) book ever printed on a Houston topic. You can order a copy here:

http://www.herringdesign.com/herringpress.asp

In a foreword by Philip Johnson, he talks about being inspired by Chartres Cathedral - it is the first thing you see of the town when you are approaching, and its looming presence is with you the entire time you are there. He wanted something that would stand alone and be an orientation, a reference point, for all Houstonians. I have read elsewhere that he was inspired by the Nebraska State Capitol, and by other art deco skyscrapers of the 1920's. He liked the idea of the traditional, iconic stone tower, but he thought it was silly to make a building out of stone in an age when you could use glass. Thus he used glass, but dimensioned the windows in such a way as to recall stone.

The building was made 64 stories tall to match the highest stock price reached by Transco (too bad they didn't hit 90 or something). The Waterwall is 64 feet tall. The building's slender profile was made possible due to sacrifices on the part of the CEO, Jack Bowen, in terms of rent and convenience, for the sake of creating a work of art. Philip Johnson has called him one of the few "true patrons" of art in the corporate world.

The developer Gerald Hines, whose favorite client was Johnson (they had done Pennzoil Place, and would do Bank of America together), wanted to have his company's offices in "the finest skyscraper that anyone could build in America." The building was thus the product of three personalities, all dedicated to the idea of art transcending any practical rationale. The result is one of the half-dozen truly unique, truly classic skyscrapers in the United States.

As to the lobby... I went up there several times as a courier a couple years ago. I think anyone who went into the building would stand a decent chance of getting in an elevator and going up there without being stopped. There is a little room up there with glass walls, always vacant, that has a three-foot model of the building sitting on a table and some windows with westward views. The elevators are neat - each is panelled in an exotic marble, with a small plate telling the location where the marble was quarried. There are usually a couple of art exhibits going on in the lobby.

Edited by H-Town Man
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is it a large poster? is it scan-able? :)

It's about 3' tall, and has been framed since '83, so probably scanning isn't an option.

If only I knew someone with a digital camera who knew how to post pictures on the 'net and wasn't scared of creepy ol' Montrose hippies, I'd share it with y'all (hint, hint :D ).

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  • 2 weeks later...
The guy who built it owned the Galleria, and he wanted a signature tower for the area.

Thye"guy who built it' was Gerald Hines! Mr hines has become one of the worlds largest and most respected real estate developers in modern history. He continues to put more back into a community than he takes away. The architectural firm that designed Transco Williams] Tower, "Johnson & Burgee Architests" of New York helped make Hines Interest what it is. Transco was one the first facilities that the Hines development-construction team masterminded in setting the pace for Hines Interest yesterday, today and for many decades to come.

We need more groups as "Hines Interest" in what they bring to the skyline across our globe. In my 45 years in the construction & development arena I have never found another firm equal to them. I was fortunate to have spent over half of my career with them from the very early eighties to the late ninties and very proud of it. Not a better more honest, sincere & dedicated real estate developer anywhere.

:D

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Back in the 80s when I was a student at Rice, a buddy of mine and I decided to go up as high as we could in Transco..........

We rode up to the top floor and found a stairwell that led even higher...... we climbed and climbed up until we found ourselves right there next to the motor that drove the spotlight around! And the pyramid roof of the very top was right over our heads. We could not have climbed any higher.

It was odd because the spotlight itself, whose beam we had seen night after night shining its great arc across the wide, flat expanses of our restless, beloved city, apparently emanated from a smallish beacon only about the size of a TV set.

Has anyone else ventured so high in Transco? This all predates 9/11, of course............

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Gene, I couldn't agree more. Where are the new crop of Hineses from Houston? Seems like all the big developers are from out of town. Houston used to have such a pioneering spirit but its gone now.

Compaq

Oshmans

Randalls

Foleys

Astroworld

What happened?

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Back in the 80s when I was a student at Rice, a buddy of mine and I decided to go up as high as we could in Transco..........

We rode up to the top floor and found a stairwell that led even higher...... we climbed and climbed up until we found ourselves right there next to the motor that drove the spotlight around! And the pyramid roof of the very top was right over our heads. We could not have climbed any higher.

It was odd because the spotlight itself, whose beam we had seen night after night shining its great arc across the wide, flat expanses of our restless, beloved city, apparently emanated from a smallish beacon only about the size of a TV set.

Has anyone else ventured so high in Transco? This all predates 9/11, of course............

OMG!!! I'm lost for words! You are one lucky person, I'm sure the only people that have ever done that before are the ones that maintain the beacon.

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I wonder how ugly this city might have turned out during its golden age of the booming late 70s and early 80s, had it not been for such minds as those of Hines, Johnson/B. (etc.). They seemed to have such a precise image of glamour and perfection, expecially for a city bustling out of nothing. It may be a shame they didn't have political ties, or even just there own people in office, image what they could have gotten done then. (Light rail, as seen in the Post Oak Blvd. Images from how ever many years back with the big steel arches).

Its also a shame we didn't have vision-ists like this as city leaders, or atleast those who cut threw red tape.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
Williams Tower - formerly known as Transco Tower

Height: 901 feet

64 stories

Circa: 1983

Architects: Johnson Burgee and Morris Aubry

Facts

- Then Transco Tower became Williams Tower when Transco Energy was bought out by Williams Energy Corp. in 1999

- Tallest building outside of any CBD

- Rotating beacon at night on roof every 15 seconds

- Williams Tower functions as two 32-floor towers stacked on top of each other, complete with separate lobbies, elevators, and garages.

- South of the building is a 3-acre park with a large fountain called the "Waterwall" (aka Transco Fountain), designed by the building's architects with Richard Fitzgerald & Partners. The fountain is a stunning work of hydraulic engineering.

- The top of the building features a beacon that sweeps the night sky over the Galleria area.

- Construction took only 16 months, a remarkably short time for a tower of such height.

2 Pics by Patrick Benders

ac9kg.gif

ac9yq.gif

WilliamsTower-001.jpg

Next four Pics by Mancuso

25470724.jpg

25470727.jpg

25470409.jpg

Former

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  • 2 weeks later...
Back in the 80s when I was a student at Rice, a buddy of mine and I decided to go up as high as we could in Transco..........

We rode up to the top floor and found a stairwell that led even higher...... we climbed and climbed up until we found ourselves right there next to the motor that drove the spotlight around! And the pyramid roof of the very top was right over our heads. We could not have climbed any higher.

It was odd because the spotlight itself, whose beam we had seen night after night shining its great arc across the wide, flat expanses of our restless, beloved city, apparently emanated from a smallish beacon only about the size of a TV set.

Has anyone else ventured so high in Transco? This all predates 9/11, of course............

In 1999 I was fortunate enough to also climb to the very tip top. It is just exactly as you described and all I can say is EXCITING!

Definitely a day I won't soon forget.

Zbrat

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  • 3 weeks later...
The transco is one of my favourites. Please clarify my statement: Is it true that the light on top was inspired by the light on top of the light towers? The light always indicates to me (on 59S) that I am getting closer to home.

No it was not. Mr. Hines in 1982 decided he wanted something different than any other building of this nature. He found a group with Disney World help him design a light as what was installed as the building was completed. :)

The transco is one of my favourites. Please clarify my statement: Is it true that the light on top was inspired by the light on top of the light towers? The light always indicates to me (on 59S) that I am getting closer to home.

No it was not. Mr. Hines in 1982 decided he wanted something different than any other building of this nature. He found a group with Disney World help him design a light as whast was installed as the building was completed. :)

Was that brick structure in front of the water wall always there? It looks terrible.

Yes it was part of the original design and construction that was completed in August of 1983. It apparently has not been kept cleaned as it use to be when I was in Houston with Hines. :)

Edited by Gene Moss
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  • 2 months later...
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I'll let you guys in on a little secret. P. Johnson played a joke on Houston, when viewed from the air, the Williams Tower with the plaza and waterwall form a very distinct phallic symbol. Burdette Keeland said this was done on purpose.

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Although mine aren't as good as some posted, I thought I would put in a couple of photo's I've taken recently.

DSC_0172.jpg

Edit: Sorry, I had another cool pic of Williams but don't have it loaded to my Photobucket acount. I'll post it later.

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Although mine aren't as good as some posted, I thought I would put in a couple of photo's I've taken recently.

DSC_0172.jpg

Edit: Sorry, I had another cool pic of Williams but don't have it loaded to my Photobucket acount. I'll post it later.

Don't sell yourself short. That is an amazing photo. I've never seen that angle before. It almost doesn't look like Houston. Amazing photo skills. Can't wait for the other one.

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Actually, this tower is pretty awesome. It reflects power, greatness and America's Energy Capital so well. There isn't anything more intended; stop with the negative junk. We have the tallest building in the world outside a CBD. Houston, you are one big Mother..... I am so fortunte I get to be a part of it. H-town B)

Edited by houstonfella
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  • 3 months later...

My Ex-Wife called it the "RAID" building, reminding her of the old, (1970's) "Raid Pest Spray" commercial showing an animated, tall can sweeping out a "dose of poison gas" from his "cap", no disrespect intended, it has always been one of my favorites as well, and is one of the few things I can smile about when I think of our marriage gone wrong...
[quote name='DaTrain' date='Saturday, January 15th, 2005 @ 6:54pm' post='12158']

Williams Tower - formerly known as Transco Tower

Height: 901 feet

64 stories

Circa: 1983

Architects: Johnson Burgee and Morris Aubry

Facts

- Then Transco Tower became Williams Tower when Transco Energy was bought out by Williams Energy Corp. in 1999

- Tallest building outside of any CBD

- Rotating beacon at night on roof every 15 seconds

- Williams Tower functions as two 32-floor towers stacked on top of each other, complete with separate lobbies, elevators, and garages.

- South of the building is a 3-acre park with a large fountain called the "Waterwall" (aka Transco Fountain), designed by the building's architects with Richard Fitzgerald & Partners. The fountain is a stunning work of hydraulic engineering.

- The top of the building features a beacon that sweeps the night sky over the Galleria area.

- Construction took only 16 months, a remarkably short time for a tower of such height.

2 Pics by Patrick Benders

ac9kg.gif

ac9yq.gif

WilliamsTower-001.jpg

Next four Pics by Mancuso

25470724.jpg

25470727.jpg

25470409.jpg

Former "TRANSCO" inscription

25580486.jpg

Waterwall

WaterWall-001.jpg

From Soul of America

WaterWall_at_theG.jpg

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I really love this building, but I'd like to point out that it's no longer the tallest building outside of a primary CBD. That, I believe, is the Manara Telekom Tower in Kuala Lumpur. And, I'm pretty certain that numerous buildings in Dubai will soon take the honors. However, Transco is the tallest building in the U.S. outside of a CBD.

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I really love this building, but I'd like to point out that it's no longer the tallest building outside of a primary CBD. That, I believe, is the Manara Telekom Tower in Kuala Lumpur. And, I'm pretty certain that numerous buildings in Dubai will soon take the honors. However, Transco is the tallest building in the U.S. outside of a CBD.

Interesting, but from what I've been able to find, it appears that the Manara Telekom Tower is in the central business district.

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  • 4 months later...

I contacted Hines management office asking for persmisson to access the observation deck. They allowed me access to watch a sunset.

After that adventure, I'd say that you could probably just walk in the building and take the express elevator to floor 56? and then take the next eleverator to level 64 unless hines has that floor keygaurded as that is there office.

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  • 9 months later...

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/5646728.html

A subsidiary of Hines Real Estate Investment Trust is buying the 65-story Williams Tower in the Galleria area for $271.5 million, according to a document filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The sale includes an adjacent parking garage, a 47.8 percent undivided interest in a 2.8-acre park and waterwall and a 2.3-acre land parcel across the street from the tower on Post Oak Boulevard.

The balance of the undivided interest in the park and waterwall is owned by an affiliate of Hines Interests Limited Partnership.

Houston-based Hines built the 1.5-million-square-foot Transco Tower in 1982. It was eventually renamed and is approximately 91 percent leased.

http://houston.bizjournals.com/houston/sto...tml?t=printable

Hines REIT Properties LP has a contract to acquire the 64-story landmark -- the tallest building in the Galleria area -- in a deal expected to close on May 1. Houston-based Hines originally developed the 1.5 million-square-foot building in 1982, but no longer holds an ownership stake in the structure.

Hines' headquarters is located in the building at 2800 Post Oak Blvd. Hines and its affiliates lease about 135,000 square feet in the building, and Hines is responsible for leasing and managing the skyscraper.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Hines Reit Purchases Williams Tower

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