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Chronicle has a good article on him in today's paper.

http://chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/4876742.html

Just some quotes I found interesting:

Hines raised the bar by showing that quality and financial success can be mutually attainable.

He was one of the first developers to hire world-famous architects, believing tenants would flock to top-quality buildings, even in a down market.

And architects appreciated his vision.

"Many developers just want to tell the architect what they want," said Gyo Obata, a founding partner of HOK, the company that designed the Galleria. ''I think he's one of the few developers that really listens to the architect."

That's not to say he's not a demanding client.

Hines said he rejected Philip Johnson's first four designs for Post Oak Central, an office complex on Post Oak, because "they didn't make sense economically and real estatewise."

"We like problem areas because other people will normally try to avoid those and we'll try to figure it out," Hines said.

I wonder what the best "probelm area" is prime for taking on right now?

Hines' legacy includes setting a standard of quality. He's obsessive over small details, such as the weight of a door, the feel of a handle or the look of a sign.

Breath of fresh air.

He's pleased with the way Houston has developed but thinks more housing would be good for downtown. "I think dead cities at night are dangerous and cause all kinds of problems and lead to rapid deterioration," he said.

Does anyone know if he's had any recent projects here or if he's currently got one going on?

Edited by lockmat
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Gerald Hines looks weird without the 'D' Gerald D Hines, lol

anyway, he's a very respectful figure or at least imo he is. the very first firm i used to work for, we did work for him all the time. actually, he was one of our biggest clients. you can check the Kendall-Heaton website and see if he's doing anything with them. i'll ask some of my friends there and see if they are currenlty doing anything with him and pm u the info.

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According to his website, he currently has nothing "under development" in Houston. Three projects are listed as "under construction": Shell Woodcreek Campus expansion; Sysco Corporate Offices; and Vertias DGC North Building Addition. (of course, there may be many they are working on under the radar at the moment, such as the oft-rumored downtown project.)

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For those familiar, what's one word or a phrase that captures his arhitectual style?

That is an interesting question, but I don't think you can really capture Hines' style except to say that he had it (style!), at least in Houston.

His development company hired the architects that designed and built his landmarks in the city, and those architects were generally world class.

The company now has an impressive resume around the world, but I think its "style" remains the spectacular accomplishments in Houston.

Other places may be more hit or miss. In Dallas the main Hines project was the Galleria which was mostly an 80's update of the Houston original - still nice, but not spectacular. Although, meanwhile there are many other great successes in Europe and Asia.

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He's pleased with the way Houston has developed but thinks more housing would be good for downtown. "I think dead cities at night are dangerous and cause all kinds of problems and lead to rapid deterioration," he said.

Anyone think this might be a tease as to how the new 47 story downtown building will be designed?

Edited by shasta
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For those familiar, what's one word or a phrase that captures his arhitectual style?

Currently I would say the company's style in Houston would be their Main Street garage. I'm not sure how much he's involved with the company any longer even though he owns the majority of it. You would probably have to direct that question to his son.

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HARVARD DESIGN SCHOOL AWARDS FIRST EVER

VISIONARY LEADERSHIP IN REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT AWARD

TO GERALD D. HINES

(BOSTON) – The Harvard Design School announced today that it has awarded its first ever Visionary Leadership in Real Estate Award to Gerald D. Hines, founder and chairman of the international real estate firm that bears his name. The award was established to honor the lifetime accomplishments of extraordinary leaders in the real estate industry and their contributions to real estate education at Harvard University and the built environment at large.

Mr. Hines was nominated for the award by Richard Peiser, who is the Michael D. Spear Professor in Real Estate Development at Harvard. The International Advisory Board of the Real Estate Academic Initiative (REAI) enthusiastically approved the nomination of Mr. Hines for this honor. The REAI supports interdisciplinary research at Harvard in the field of real estate and urban development, and helps build the community of faculty, students and alumni who are active in the real estate industry. The five primary schools that participate in the initiative are the Business School, Design School, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard Law School and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which includes the undergraduate college.

To celebrate the award, a student reception at Harvard’s Knafel Building was held. In attendance were real estate organizations from both Harvard and MIT. Students were able to visit one-on-one with Mr. Hines, and received a copy of his biography “Hines: A Legacy of Quality in the Built Environment.” Following the reception was a fireside-chat forum in the Sackler Auditorium, which was open to the public. Professor Peiser prompted Mr. Hines to discuss his career, leadership in bringing great architecture into commercial development, leadership in sustainable development, and also building one of the most successful international real estate organizations in the world. Mr. Hines’ son, Jeff Hines, who is President and CEO of the firm, joined his father on stage and shared memories about his early days working in the Hines organization, taking over the leadership with his father still being a very strong presence, and the addition of fund investment to development in the company’s focus.

As a close to the event, Mr. Hines was presented a crystal sculpture by Joe O’Connor, the first chairman of the REAI and a personal friend. Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Mohsen Mostafavi, presented Mr. Hines with a proclamation on behalf of the University which read: “In recognition of his exceptional contributions to higher education in real estate, his innovations in office buildings and mixed-use development, his commitment to design excellence, his inspiration to generations of real estate professionals, both in his own company and in other organizations, and his unique impact on the built environment throughout the world.”

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I'm old enough to remember Gerald Hines working with Philip Johnson and I.M. Pei. Hines and Johnson reputedly had a working relationship that consisted of Hines reining in Johnson's wildest ideas and Johnson wheedling and cajoling Hines into giving him more of a free hand. Good stuff resulted. I wish the current Hines Interests would be more daring in their designs for Houston. 

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Saw this in my facebook feed today. Hines put together a "coloring book" of sorts featuring their projects, available in PDF format.

 

https://www.hines.com/coloringbook?fbclid=IwAR2pZz7DXZIhteFapnIa0HHj6_EPsHuXLkQpWk98r6MFJ7-2_tMOJXNJEPI

 

Naturally, Houston is well represented.

Edited by ChannelTwoNews
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On 4/9/2020 at 6:44 PM, ChannelTwoNews said:

Saw this in my facebook feed today. Hines put together a "coloring book" of sorts featuring their projects, available in PDF format.

 

https://www.hines.com/coloringbook?fbclid=IwAR2pZz7DXZIhteFapnIa0HHj6_EPsHuXLkQpWk98r6MFJ7-2_tMOJXNJEPI

 

Naturally, Houston is well represented.

Too much shade/tones to be a proper coloring book. You might have better luck photo shopping the photos they used. - Choosing Beggar

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https://realtynewsreport.com/happy-birthday-to-the-worlds-most-important-developer/Image default

Happy Birthday to ‘The World’s Most Important Developer’

 

HOUSTON – (Realty News Report) – Gerald D. Hines turned 95 last week.

Mr. Hines, founded his real estate company in Houston in 1957. Today, his skyscrapers decorate skylines around the world. His hotels and residences provide places to rest and dream. His public plazas and retail centers give us places to enjoy life.

A couple of years ago, Houstonian Rusty Bienvenue, executive director of the American Institute of Architects, called Hines the world’s “most important” developer. “We’re fortunate that he calls Houston home and has done some of his best projects here,” Bienvenue said. “Most architects study his Pennzoil Place and the Galleria in architecture school. He understands a commercial building is not just a container. If you make it beautiful, it will draw in a higher rent value.”

Case in point: the Pennzoil Place in downtown Houston. Hines broke the boring mold of architectural sameness. Pennzoil Place consists of two trapezoidal towers wrapped in dark glass. Completed in 1975, the Pennzoil Place, designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee, was named Building of the Decade by New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable. Pop artist Andy Warhol traveled to Houston to take Polaroids snapshots of it.

With the Pennzoil building, Mr. Hines proved that corporate tenants would pay more to be located in a building with outstanding architecture. It sent aftershocks around the world and cities became better places because of it.

Hines operates in 205 cities in 24 countries around the world. The company has developed, redeveloped or acquired 1,393 properties totaling 459 million square feet.

Hines-Gerald-headshot--150x150.jpg Gerald Hines

Not bad for an Indiana kid who arrived in Houston with a slide-rule, an engineering degree from Purdue and only a few bucks in his pocket. At first, he lived in the YMCA until he got his feet on the ground.

Mr. Hines built up a portfolio of small buildings around town. About 1970 he tackled two major projects almost simultaneously – The Galleria and the One Shell Plaza office tower. The 50-story One Shell Plaza, now called 910 Louisiana, was far taller than anything he had ever attempted. He passed the double risk-test, receiving acclaim around the world and major commercial success.

Importantly, Houstonians loved the new developments. Ladies and gentlemen, teens and toddlers – everybody wanted to visit the three-level Galleria and its ice skating rink. You heard people brag about working at One Shell Plaza.

The Hines company continues to change Houston. Its 47-story Texas Tower in downtown is about halfway to completion.  Also a new outdoor plaza, designed by HOK, is underway at the 75-story Hines building next door to the city’s theater district.

A few years ago, the late president George H.W. Bush had a word to say about Mr. Hines at an event at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.

President Bush said: “Gerald Hines envisioned Houston as a city of beautiful buildings.”

And indeed, Gerald D. Hines has built more than a few.


Aug 18,. 2020 Realty News Report Copyright 2020

by Realty News ReportAugust 18, 2020

 

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On 8/22/2020 at 3:42 AM, ernie5823 said:

It is a 1962 Pontiac. My father had a 1964 Catalina in a very attractive turquois blue. Starting in 1963 full size Pontiacs had the headlights arranged vertically. This was the configuration through the 1967 model year. Cadillac did the same with its 1965 through 1968 models.

Edited by Specwriter
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11 hours ago, august948 said:

 

We need to start telling people H-Town means Hines-Town...;)

 

 

Not to be overlooked is Kenneth Schnitzer, who did the green tower (Allied Bank/Wells Fargo), the Texas Heritage Plaza, and some or all of the Allen Center buildings. Also did Greenway Plaza and the Summit, but was doomed to forever play second fiddle to Hines, who picked Post Oak Boulevard to build his edge city (Post Oak Central, Galleria, Transco Tower).

 

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https://www.bisnow.com/houston/news/property-management/hines-unveils-new-multifamily-property-management-firm-willowick-residential-106304?utm_source=outbound_pub_4&utm_campaign=outbound_issue_42752&utm_content=outbound_link_1&utm_medium=email

Hines Unveils New Multifamily Property Management Firm Willowick Residential

 

Hines has launched its own multifamily property management firm called Willowick Residential, which will work in partnership with the firm’s growing multifamily portfolio.

The new company, named after founder Gerald Hines’ first multifamily residential building in the River Oaks area of Houston, was launched earlier this year and, as of October, manages nine of Hines’ multifamily properties in the U.S. So far, the new venture has 35 employees.

Five of the properties are in Houston: Venue Museum District, Tinsley on the Park near Midtown, The Rosemary in Humble, Stone Loch in Tomball and Alys Crossing in Cypress. The other properties are two multifamily complexes in Dallas and two in Chicago.

Hines Senior Vice President of Multifamily Operations Lisa Newton told Bisnow the timing of the launch was predominantly about the scale needed to properly launch an in-house management platform.

“Between existing assets in operations, upcoming development and acquisition activity, 2020 was the right time,” Newton said.

The company, which has historically been known for office product, launched the new division earlier this year but chose to delay the announcement in light of the coronavirus pandemic, according to Newton. The branding and timing also serve to honor founder Gerald Hines, who died Aug. 23.

“While Willowick Residential was launched earlier in the year before the pandemic, COVID-19 did play a factor in waiting to [publicize] the news until now to ensure we were properly addressing growing health and wellness concerns,” Newton added.

In the long run, the goal is to make Willowick Residential the sole property management firm overseeing all Hines multifamily properties in the U.S., Newton said. However, that will depend on what is most beneficial for each multifamily asset, within its specific market.

Hines’ multifamily portfolio consists of 63 projects across 38 U.S. cities, including luxury towers, urban mid-rises and traditional garden-style apartments.

“Rooted in the expertise of our regional offices, our growing and successful multifamily division has expanded for-rent apartment development activity throughout the United States,” Hines President and CEO Jeff Hines said in a statement. 

“Willowick Residential seeks to deliver a superior level of resident service, above-industry retention rates, cost-effective building management and superior engineering and maintenance of the physical asset.”

Contact Christie Moffat at christie.moffat@bisnow.com
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Former home of Gerald Hines in River Oaks hits market for $34.5M

https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2021/03/10/gerald-hines-former-home-river-oaks-for-sale.html

Quote

 

The Mediterranean-style mansion that late Houston real estate mogul Gerald Hines called home for decades is officially on the market with an asking price of $34.5 million.

The 17,405-square-foot, three-story mansion at 2920 Lazy Lane sits on a 4.5-acre property in the Homewoods neighborhood of River Oaks. The primary home has four to five bedrooms and 11 bathrooms. There's also an adjoining guest apartment and a separate caretaker’s residence.

Hines, who died in August at the age of 95, was, of course, known for his keen interest in real estate. For his own home, Hines turned to close friend and renowned architect Philip Johnson for advice. Johnson recommended New York-based Robert A.M. Stern Architects to design an Italian-style villa that recalled Hines’ vacations in Tuscany. Stern Architects is known for designing estates for wealthy homebuyers around the world.

When the home was completed in 1992, Hines nicknamed it Adagio, Italian for “at a slow tempo.” The home features a number of design elements reminiscent of its Mediterranean muses, including terra cotta roof tiles, white columns, grand hallways with arched doorways and domed ceilings.

 

2MiZ2mG.jpg

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