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While I am proud of the new development around Almeda and the 3rd ward area, but is it taking too much of Houston 3rd ward away? My dad, aunts, and uncles grew up in third ward and there house was just two blocks from being destroyed by 288. They don't like all the lofts and residential buildings there putting up all over third ward. They really hate it when there tearing down old building that were just eyesores to the rest of Houston but had historical significance to the people living in that area. They like, and I do to, how my Grandmothers house value has shoot through the roof because she now lives in The Museum District. But was it at the expense of Third Ward? Pretty much what is left of third ward is east of 288. But the lofts have made there way east across the freeway where TSU and UH are located. The residents have put signs in their yards saying "Third Ward is our Home" opposing the new development of Third Ward. If Texas Southern does not get its act straight the state might let UH take it over, now that might be a stretch but if that happens Third Ward will be lost forever. I love Houston, and I also love the history of Third ward. We once went down almost every Saturday to get our hair cuts. The conversations you would hear between the old and young men always made me laugh when they got louder and started yelling their points across. Now to see that barber shop is gone makes my feel upset because my son wont get his hair cut their like I did and my dad did and his dad. To go around 3rd Ward when my dad shows me his old hangouts and friends houses and their not their just gets him upset too. Houston needs to know how to preserve not just Third Ward but all of Houston's Historic Wards. If anybody has pics of the different wards in Houston they will be nice to look at so feel free to post them up.

Edited by Deut28Thirteen
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The best thing for TSU is an idependent TSU. I am pulling for them to make it.

That being said, Ms. Slade needs to serve some serious jail time for her transgressions. I would love to see the black community get so pissed about this that they'd take to the streets in protest against those who were in charge at TSU.

I don't even think the students protested. I know I would have.

So far, all we have seen is Rep. Garnett Coleman fight Gov. Perry. I am no Perry fan, but Coleman only sees issues in two colors, and I don't have to tell you which two they are.

Edited by MidtownCoog
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Were these places destroyed as a result of development or did they simply fade away.

many faded away. there are numerous empty lots there ripe for the pickin. many who became successful left due to the problems in the area and wanted to raise their families where they "felt" it would be better. these properties were bought cheaply years ago and are now rentals. the area can be saved but the residents who own must do something to save their properties. as taxes increase in the area, those people that remain will have to be wealthier in order to pay them.

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many faded away. there are numerous empty lots there ripe for the pickin. many who became successful left due to the problems in the area and wanted to raise their families where they "felt" it would be better. these properties were bought cheaply years ago and are now rentals. the area can be saved but the residents who own must do something to save their properties. as taxes increase in the area, those people that remain will have to be wealthier in order to pay them.

Thats what I figured. Many fail to grasp the concept that a neighborhood is not a static thing. People come and go and so does the neighborhood. I hear the same arguments coming from the Montrose and Heights areas to. My old neighborhood in Clear Lake has changed immensely from when I lived in it as a little kid (partly due to the shoddy construction of the housing) and Greenwich Village in New York is definetly not the same as it was 20 years ago. Neighborhoods are dynamic things that are bound to change over time, especially in the inner city.

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While I am proud of the new development around Almeda and the 3rd ward area, but is it taking too much of Houston 3rd ward away? My dad, aunts, and uncles grew up in third ward and there house was just two blocks from being destroyed by 288. They don't like all the lofts and residential buildings there putting up all over third ward. They really hate it when there tearing down old building that were just eyesores to the rest of Houston but had historical significance to the people living in that area. They like, and I do to, how my Grandmothers house value has shoot through the roof because she now lives in The Museum District. But was it at the expense of Third Ward? Pretty much what is left of third ward is east of 288. But the lofts have made there way east across the freeway where TSU and UH are located. The residents have put signs in their yards saying "Third Ward is our Home" opposing the new development of Third Ward. If Texas Southern does not get its act straight the state might let UH take it over, now that might be a stretch but if that happens Third Ward will be lost forever. I love Houston, and I also love the history of Third ward. We once went down almost every Saturday to get our hair cuts. The conversations you would hear between the old and young men always made me laugh when they got louder and started yelling their points across. Now to see that barber shop is gone makes my feel upset because my son wont get his hair cut their like I did and my dad did and his dad. To go around 3rd Ward when my dad shows me his old hangouts and friends houses and their not their just gets him upset too. Houston needs to know how to preserve not just Third Ward but all of Houston's Historic Wards. If anybody has pics of the different wards in Houston they will be nice to look at so feel free to post them up.

It's the way of all neighborhooods ... it is happening in Bellaire, West U ... everywhere. People are buying up old homes (sometimes 2 at a time) to build MacMansions.

Someone mentioned it correctly. Get the land and a home before the developers. Probably the only real way to have an impact.

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I am all for preserving historic structures, however I am against halting re-development because a group of people are trying to hold on to their childhood memories.

If an area becomes run down and neglected, I am all for coming in and re-developing the area.

What are some structures in the 3rd Ward that hold historic signicance?

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What are some structures in the 3rd Ward that hold historic signicance?

what is historic to one isn't to another. but if there are some nice (even restorable) structures, i think they could be restored to their heyday.

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what is historic to one isn't to another. but if there are some nice (even restorable) structures, i think they could be restored to their heyday.

Hopefully some of the old structures will be preserved, but what can't be preserved is the social structure of old 3rd Ward, and I think that's what Deut28 and others lament. 3rd Ward has finally caught up to the City, and we all know what that means.

I'm as guilty as anyone of wanting to have historic movie sets around town, but I realize that reality for most old nabes, once land values ripen, is a prop or two here and there against a modern backdrop.

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The real problem in the Third Ward is what is being replaced and what isn't being replaced.

Unfortunately, developers tend to not take too big of a risk so they are heading into relatively stable parts of the Third Ward like Riverside and Washington Terraces. They are replacing beautiful 1930s homes with tin shacks. They are replacing front lawns and trees with gated shared driveways. They are replacing porches that greet the street with looming garages.

What they aren't replacing are the empty shotgun houses, vacant lots, and boarded up commercial spaces that are closer to I-45.

That is the real shame.

It's the same thing in River Oaks. It's amazing to see perfectly viable houses come down because someone wants a stucco palace with his and hers water closets and 5 car garages.

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I am all for preserving historic structures, however I am against halting re-development because a group of people are trying to hold on to their childhood memories.

If an area becomes run down and neglected, I am all for coming in and re-developing the area.

What are some structures in the 3rd Ward that hold historic signicance?

Musicman sayed it right. A lot of these places are signicance to only the Black population in Houston Wells here are a couple frome 3rd 4th and 5th wards some still here and some not:Freedmans Town, Antian Baptist, Trinity Medthodist, Kelly Court, Cuney Homes, Gregory Institute, Houston Colored Junior Collage (later TSU-1947), St John Baptist, Riverside Hospital, Washington Terrace, I guss UofH and there a lot more. Here is are a link to what the Museum of Fine Arts Houston where they did a project on Thrid Ward

http://eyeonthirdward.mfah.org/reflections.asp

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What they aren't replacing are the empty shotgun houses, vacant lots, and boarded up commercial spaces that are closer to I-45.

That is the real shame.

i will have to disagree. go off Hutchins and bastrop from 45south and you'd be amazed at some of the new construction.

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Musicman sayed it right. A lot of these places are signicance to only the Black population in Houston Wells here are a couple frome 3rd 4th and 5th wards some still here and some not:Freedmans Town, Antian Baptist, Trinity Medthodist, Kelly Court, Cuney Homes, Gregory Institute, Houston Colored Junior Collage (later TSU-1947), St John Baptist, Riverside Hospital, Washington Terrace, I guss UofH and there a lot more. Here is are a link to what the Museum of Fine Arts Houston where they did a project on Thrid Ward

http://eyeonthirdward.mfah.org/reflections.asp

I disagree ... I think a lot of people (black and white) take historical significance of neighborhoods seriously. The problem is that most developers don't --unless it is included as a 'feature' of the developer.

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Musicman sayed it right. A lot of these places are signicance to only the Black population in Houston
i don't know if i said only the black population cares but rather only certain people. i had no connection to where i am now (pecan park) but after knowing the original owner's son (he was my parents neighbor since 1970 and died recently) and getting to meet the original owner (she was 98 when i bought it from her) i do feel a connection to the area. i know her daughter (who has the dog grooming place on studewood) was amazed when she saw the pics of how i updated the inside. she mentioned to me how her and her brothers used to play ping pong on the dining room table i bought from them. which i thought was a cool anecdote.

you have to have a little vision to see what an old structure can turn in to. unforunately, most don't have it and see something "new" as better. i saw a supposed restorer, take out the shiplap on the interior of the house because it would be easier to wire. of course it was never replaced. :( that's not the kind of restored structure i'd like

Edited by musicman
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"Musicman sayed it right. A lot of these places are signicance to only the Black population in Houston" what I ment by this is most people living in 3rd ward are black and they believe that 3rd ward is a place full of history while people living out side the wards see the buildings as eyesoures and think they should be taken down.

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"Musicman sayed it right. A lot of these places are signicance to only the Black population in Houston" what I ment by this is most people living in 3rd ward are black and they believe that 3rd ward is a place full of history while people living out side the wards see the buildings as eyesoures and think they should be taken down.

i think there are some whites and hispanics on your side. i know i hate it when people say "we need to bulldoze 3rd ward". while there are many places in houston that are rough, these same places are peoples' homes.

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There are some amazing houses in parts of 3rd Ward. Though some of them are in bad shape, they would make nice homes if brought back. Many of the bungalows are brick, and they have interesting architectural details that are still intact. Though they are of the same era, these houses were of better construction quality than many Heights bungalows.

I'd also like to see someone do something creative with some of the shotgun houses. There are some really interesting remodels of shotguns in New Orleans. While living there, I saw people combine two houses to make one living space with a courtyard in the middle, or they would completely re-configure the interior to a "loft-like" configuration with cathedral ceilings and mezzanine levels. One can also raise a shotgun and create more lving space or a garage underneath (raising a shotgun might afford the occupants some good views of the downtown skyline). Shotguns are definitely a more versatile house-type than most people give them credit for!

Edited by Dan the Man
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One thing I've noticed is that people are starting to change the name of the area. 15-20 years ago, the area was known as Third Ward. Now, people are coming in and referring to parts of it as "Museum District", "Medical Center area", "Neartown" and even "Midtown".

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One thing I've noticed is that people are starting to change the name of the area. 15-20 years ago, the area was known as Third Ward. Now, people are coming in and referring to parts of it as "Museum District", "Medical Center area", "Neartown" and even "Midtown".

Also try 'Almeda Annex' for areas just east of 288 ... LOL ... what a crock.

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One thing I've noticed is that people are starting to change the name of the area. 15-20 years ago, the area was known as Third Ward. Now, people are coming in and referring to parts of it as "Museum District", "Medical Center area", "Neartown" and even "Midtown".

that's just because 3rd ward has a bad connotation to most. i know a couple of montrose residents who say they live in museum dist.

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I am all for preserving historic structures, however I am against halting re-development because a group of people are trying to hold on to their childhood memories.

If an area becomes run down and neglected, I am all for coming in and re-developing the area.

What are some structures in the 3rd Ward that hold historic signicance?

I would have to agree completely. I've never understood the fight for 3rd ward; when at the same time, those fighting to save it are doing nothing to preserve it.

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I now live in Riverside Terrace, but my family roots are in the 3rd Ward. We owned property all through the area north of Elgin St. As family members died or moved out , My parents bought several of those homes . Through the years it was hard finding renters who would not trash and tear up the homes or use the vacant land for dumping. Now those 7 homes and 5 vacant lots we have on Napoleon, McIlhenny,Dennis and Anita are valued at nearly $800,000.00 by HCAD. Thinking back as to how my parent's on their salaries from the Post Office and HISD made such a very wise investment just because they wanted to keep it in the family is amazing. To my fellow 3rd Wardians I would advice you to stop trying to halt redevelopment and join in by buying some of those old homes and lands and help revitalize the area. Be a part of the future , while doing your part to save memories of the past. Nothing stays the same.

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I would have to agree completely. I've never understood the fight for 3rd ward; when at the same time, those fighting to save it are doing nothing to preserve it.

How can some one not understand the fight? My Grandmothers house is worth over 300,000 not a lot of people in Third Ward can afford to buy an lot and preserve the history by themselfs, other than the ones who are puting up all those condos and lofts, thats why there puting signs in there yard and asking the city to help. Even MFA Houston sees the history of third ward. Click on the link to see the photos and read the history then maybe you will understand. I like the development but let the ones who are developing preserve the history since there the people who can afford it with the help of the community. The best pic is the on by Kristyl Richard "We Have a Future"

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Spikey2 Deut28Thirteen and others. I applaud your commitment to saving the Houston's Historic Third Ward. Urban renewal aka gentrification has been dismantling historic African American communities throughout the US. DC's upscale Georgetown area aka as Foggy Bottom was once home to an African American community as was Boston's South End community, both now gentrified. And as you probably already know Harlem is quickly undergoing urban renewal (gentrification). There are many other examples, too numerous to list here. Urban renewal is so closely aligned with dismantling historic African American communities that in some quarters, it is referred to as "Negro removal"

My grandfather always used to refer to urban removal as "Negro removal". Although I heard others in the African American community use this term as well, I never saw this term in print until I encountered the book, Places of Their Own: African American Suburbanization in the Twentieth Century, by Andrew Wiese (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004). On page 107, Wiese writes that the abuses or urban removal as "Negro removal have been well documented in cities, but not as well documented in suburbs even though it also occurred in the suburbs. In support of his claim, he cites 3 authors, 2 who have written about the process in cities and 1 who has documented the process in the suburbs. The 2 authors who have documented this process in cities include Mathew Edel, "Planning, Market or Warfare: Recent Land Use Conflict in American Cities," in Readings in Urban Economics, ed. Mathew Edel and Jerome Rothenberg (New York, 1972); also Marc A. Weiss, "The Origins and Legacy of Urban Renewal," in Federal Housing Policy and Programs, Past and Present, ed. J. Paul Mitchell (New Brunswick, N.J., 1985), 253-76.

B)

At any rate, it is good to see that folks who have some affiliation or connection with The Third Ward and concerned, talking about and some taking action to preserve the neighborhood.

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How can some one not understand the fight? My Grandmothers house is worth over 300,000 not a lot of people in Third Ward can afford to buy an lot and preserve the history by themselfs, other than the ones who are puting up all those condos and lofts, thats why there puting signs in there yard and asking the city to help. Even MFA Houston sees the history of third ward. Click on the link to see the photos and read the history then maybe you will understand. I like the development but let the ones who are developing preserve the history since there the people who can afford it with the help of the community. The best pic is the on by Kristyl Richard "We Have a Future"

Yes, but Houston lacks zoning. If that parcel of land were zoned to be single family residential only, a developer would not be able to come in and put up townhomes on that parcel, and the likelihood of "preserving" the look and feel of the 3rd ward would increase.

But we dont have zoning, and there is very little that can be done to preserve the look and feel of entire sections of town.

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Yes, but Houston lacks zoning. If that parcel of land were zoned to be single family residential only, a developer would not be able to come in and put up townhomes on that parcel, and the likelihood of "preserving" the look and feel of the 3rd ward would increase.

But we dont have zoning, and there is very little that can be done to preserve the look and feel of entire sections of town.

deed restrictions will also preserve the parcels as is. but it takes lots of work. if the property is restricted, the developer can't do anything that is against the restrictions.

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At any rate, it is good to see that folks who have some affiliation or connection with The Third Ward and concerned, talking about and some taking action to preserve the neighborhood.

I understand. It's just a matter of time before the bulldozers come our way. :blink:

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deed restrictions will also preserve the parcels as is. but it takes lots of work. if the property is restricted, the developer can't do anything that is against the restrictions.

True, but deed restrictions only protect one parcel at a time... and cannot preserve an entire area i.e. Third Ward.

Zoning would take care of the entire area in one slam of the gavel so to speak.

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True, but deed restrictions only protect one parcel at a time... and cannot preserve an entire area i.e. Third Ward.

Zoning would take care of the entire area in one slam of the gavel so to speak.

deed restrictions protect all properties in the same platted neighborhood. with the powers that developers have at city hall, there's no way zoning will pass here.

Edited by musicman
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How can some one not understand the fight? My Grandmothers house is worth over 300,000 not a lot of people in Third Ward can afford to buy an lot and preserve the history by themselfs, other than the ones who are puting up all those condos and lofts, thats why there puting signs in there yard and asking the city to help. Even MFA Houston sees the history of third ward. Click on the link to see the photos and read the history then maybe you will understand. I like the development but let the ones who are developing preserve the history since there the people who can afford it with the help of the community. The best pic is the on by Kristyl Richard "We Have a Future"

Who owned the house before your grandmother? Who is to say that a neighborhood belongs to one group or class of individuals? How do you define that group? And how come yours is so special that it should in your mind be exempt from the processes of demographic change, when it was yours that caused a change earlier in that neighborhood's history? And how come the future residents are so looked down upon when they're only taking a role that your grandmother once had?

I'm sure that the MFA recognizes that the 3rd Ward has history; they'd probably recognize that ALL neighborhoods have history if you prompted them with the question. None more than any other.

Urban renewal is so closely aligned with dismantling historic African American communities that in some quarters, it is referred to as "Negro removal"

My grandfather always used to refer to urban removal as "Negro removal". Although I heard others in the African American community use this term as well, I never saw this term in print until I encountered the book, Places of Their Own: African American Suburbanization in the Twentieth Century, by Andrew Wiese (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004). On page 107, Wiese writes that the abuses or urban removal as "Negro removal have been well documented in cities, but not as well documented in suburbs even though it also occurred in the suburbs. In support of his claim, he cites 3 authors, 2 who have written about the process in cities and 1 who has documented the process in the suburbs. The 2 authors who have documented this process in cities include Mathew Edel, "Planning, Market or Warfare: Recent Land Use Conflict in American Cities," in Readings in Urban Economics, ed. Mathew Edel and Jerome Rothenberg (New York, 1972); also Marc A. Weiss, "The Origins and Legacy of Urban Renewal," in Federal Housing Policy and Programs, Past and Present, ed. J. Paul Mitchell (New Brunswick, N.J., 1985), 253-76.

B)

At any rate, it is good to see that folks who have some affiliation or connection with The Third Ward and concerned, talking about and some taking action to preserve the neighborhood.

You and others may call it "negro removal". I call it integration...and it's about damned time.

Edited by TheNiche
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how come yours is so special that it should in your mind be exempt from the processes of demographic change, when it was yours that caused a change earlier in that neighborhood's history?

So who 'caused' white flight? Are you saying blacks did?

I call it integration...and it's about damned time.

As long as it works both ways ... I'm fine with it.

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Who owned the house before your grandmother? Who is to say that a neighborhood belongs to one group or class of individuals? How do you define that group? And how come yours is so special that it should in your mind be exempt from the processes of demographic change, when it was yours that caused a change earlier in that neighborhood's history? And how come the future residents are so looked down upon when they're only taking a role that your grandmother once had?

I'm sure that the MFA recognizes that the 3rd Ward has history; they'd probably recognize that ALL neighborhoods have history if you prompted them with the question. None more than any other.

You and others may call it "nego removal". I call it integration...and it's about damned time.

Thought Exercise: Caucasians begin moving to the Third Ward in large numbers, but do nothing to physically alter the neighborhood.

Are the residents whom are currently complaining still upset?

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Millenica, would you be in favor of "red-lining" The Tre[y]? I thought it was illegal. That'd sure stop those developers though.

No, I am not in favor of redlining nor am I suggesting it. Redlining is technically illegal although I am aware that it was used to create, maintain, and marginalize African American communities in the past. My point is only that once historic African American communities are discovered (and often they are discovered because they are close to desirable areas), they are rapidly gentrified and African Americans end up being displaced completely and scattered into the far flung suburbs. That's what happened in DC's Georgetown, Boston's South End, and is currently taking place in Chicago, Harlem, in the Bay View Hunters Point area of San Francisco, Treme (pronounced "Trah-May"; (historically sometimes called Trem

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I lived in one of those far out suburbs. Ridgemont (tightest elementary school back in da day) and other close neighborhoods was once a master planed community in southwest Houston for the upper class of Houston, and now its is mostly a minority community of blacks and hispanics because the cost of living in the inner city is just too much. Its not integration if the people in third ward cant stay because the cost of living is too much cause the new people are moving in.

Edited by Deut28Thirteen
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I don't live in Houston and so don't know much about your zoning policies or lack thereof, but I think that good urban planning could avoid the worst of what could happen to the Historic Third Ward. B)

It's hard to urban plan so that one property has lower taxes/value than its neighbor, which is about the only way I can see that urban planning can prevent gentrification. Besides, there are studies out there that show that gentrification doesn't result in high displacement rates, but actually benefits a lot of the original homeowners by, raising their property values, attracting improved services and infrastructure and by eliminating many other negative aspects of their environment, like crime. And in Houston, property taxes are limited to 10% increases annually, unless the structure on the property has been improved somehow, and once a person hits 65, taxes are all but eliminated.

Third Ward's State Rep. Garnet Coleman is trying another tactic, that of taking money from the Midtown TIRZ (Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone), which one would think was meant to improve Midtown, and is buying up land in 3rd Ward to keep it for lower income rentals in the future. I find this repugnant but I've heard little criticism of his actions, which shows that people aren't color blind, just color scared.

And while no one with a beating heart likes to see people forced to move, I hope we don't end up with unfair rent control laws like NY, L.A and other areas have.

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Besides, there are studies out there that show that gentrification doesn't result in high displacement rates, but actually benefits a lot of the original homeowners by, raising their property values, attracting improved services and infrastructure and by eliminating many other negative aspects of their environment, like crime.

It would be helpful if you could provide the citations of the studies that show that gentrification doesn't result in high displacement rates. I don't doubt that there are benefits to homeowners. I agree that residents benefit when property values are increased, improved infrastructure and services attracted to the area, and crime rates lowered (I can't believe that crime is ever eliminated). While all of these are desirable benefits to the neighborhood, people only benefit from them if they can afford to stay in the neighborhood.

Based on my personal experience I haven't found that be the case in practice (it certainly wasn't the case in Boston's South End or in West Philadelphia which has been gentrified by folks affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania that provides low interest loans to University folks who want to purchase houses in a specific neighborhood. I know because this is how I purchased the house I currently own in the West Philadelphia neighborhood). Very few of the original residents of Boston's South End live in the gentrified neighborhood because they simply couldn't the afford the taxes on their properties. The same is true in West Philadelphia. So I really would appreciate having the citations, so I can be convinced otherwise and see in which specific locations long term residents haven't been displaced.

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We I speak of 3 rd ward .I speak of the area north of Alabama. The areas south of Alabama such as Riverside, Timbercrest, Sutton Place , Washington Terrace etc. were never a part of 3 rd ward. Only after white flight in the 50's and 60's and the area becoming predominately African American did everyone start calling this areas

3 rd ward. This area was built by whites, for whites, for a short time it was integrated and than became mostly one race, it is now becoming integrated and many of those young people moving into those town homes and condos are African Americans and other minorities moving from town homes in the galleria area,and briar forest area. This seems to be the area everyone is talking about.

"Old 3 rd Ward" is very different.

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It would be helpful if you could provide the citations of the studies that show that gentrification doesn't result in high displacement rates.

USA Today link (Urban Affairs Review study cited)

There was another one that we discussed in the link about Garnet Coleman in my earlier post, but it's gone now.

I will say that most of the reasons that this study mentions for allowing residents to remain in gentrifying areas; subsidies, paying more of a percentage of income towards housing, living with more people per household , are all potentially temporary, meaning that if prices get too high, the thread will finally snap. Rent control, in some cities and prayer will still be there.

But should government be interfering in the market place with things like rent control? I say no. Living where you want to is not a basic human right.

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USA Today link (Urban Affairs Review study cited)

There was another one that we discussed in the link about Garnet Coleman in my earlier post, but it's gone now.

I will say that most of the reasons that this study mentions for allowing residents to remain in gentrifying areas; subsidies, paying more of a percentage of income towards housing, living with more people per household , are all potentially temporary, meaning that if prices get too high, the thread will finally snap. Rent control, in some cities and prayer will still be there.

But should government be interfering in the market place with things like rent control? I say no. Living where you want to is not a basic human right.

Thanks for sending the USA Today link. I'll have to go the library and see if I can find the actual article that USA Today is citing as I prefer to read the original and draw my own conclusions rather than rely on what a newspaper, magazine or individual has concluded from their reading of the original material.

My guess is that you and I probably disagree about some aspects government regulation. But, I am a big supporter of diversity in all aspects of life--including diversity and differences of opinion. B)

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...thats why there puting signs in there yard and asking the city to help.

The city is not going to do anything to help preserve 3rd Ward. Allowing the area to gentrify is in the city's best interest, as it will increase their tax base, and they recognize that fact. If residents want the neighborhood's history to be preserved, they should step in and do something about it themselves. This would be a lot more effective than just complaining that the city isn't helping.

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I lived in one of those far out suburbs. Ridgemont (tightest elementary school back in da day) and other close neighborhoods was once a master planed community in southwest Houston for the upper class of Houston, and now its is mostly a minority community of blacks and hispanics because the cost of living in the inner city is just too much. Its not integration if the people in third ward cant stay because the cost of living is too much cause the new people are moving in.

not sure if i believe your explanation. many blacks (the ones who could afford to) left the 3rd ward because the schools were poor there and wanted to move where public schools were better (at least some i know) and that was ft bend county. Now, that the 3rd ward is being discovered by developers, land values are going up. many minorities that are fairly well off prefer a new home vs one in an area considered poor.

Edited by musicman
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USA Today link (Urban Affairs Review study cited)

There was another one that we discussed in the link about Garnet Coleman in my earlier post, but it's gone now.

I will say that most of the reasons that this study mentions for allowing residents to remain in gentrifying areas; subsidies, paying more of a percentage of income towards housing, living with more people per household , are all potentially temporary, meaning that if prices get too high, the thread will finally snap. Rent control, in some cities and prayer will still be there.

But should government be interfering in the market place with things like rent control? I say no. Living where you want to is not a basic human right.

excellent article danax. the information should be eyeopening for those who can put aside the race aspect.

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Does the City of Houston do more to keep the histoy of the Heights even though the wards were here 1st. It was created as a new area for the upper class of the city and now its has a very diverse population now. I dont think I started this topic as Blacks vs Whites or who got up rotted from the third ward 1st but to let people know that third ward and the other wards history is worth keeping. Even in this forum it say the heights is the only place to see the city as it was a 100 years ago. Does houston think the heights history is more important than that of Third Ward?

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The city is not going to do anything to help preserve 3rd Ward. Allowing the area to gentrify is in the city's best interest, as it will increase their tax base, and they recognize that fact. If residents want the neighborhood's history to be preserved, they should step in and do something about it themselves. This would be a lot more effective than just complaining that the city isn't helping.

Back in December 2006, I read a NYTimes Article about an arts project that was underway in the Third Ward under the direction of Robert Lowe. At the time I read the article, I knew very little about the Third Ward except for what I gleaned from the article. I've pasted the link to the article that appeared in the NYTimes and another link to an article that first appeared in High Performance. Is anyone familiar with this project? Does anyone know what effect it is having on the Third Ward?

NYTimes article

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/17/arts/design/17kimm.html?

ex=1324011600&en=cb028cf20506be7b&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

High Performance article

http://www.communityarts.net/readingroom/a...in_the_hous.php

Back in December 2006, I read a NYTimes Article about an arts project that was underway in the Third Ward under the direction of Robert Lowe. At the time I read the article, I knew very little about the Third Ward except for what I gleaned from the article. I've pasted the link to the article that appeared in the NYTimes and another link to an article that first appeared in High Performance. Is anyone familiar with this project? Does anyone know what effect it is having on the Third Ward?

NYTimes article

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/17/arts/design/17kimm.html?

ex=1324011600&en=cb028cf20506be7b&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

High Performance article

http://www.communityarts.net/readingroom/a...in_the_hous.php

Apologies. The man's name is Rick Lowe.

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Does the City of Houston do more to keep the histoy of the Heights even though the wards were here 1st. It was created as a new area for the upper class of the city and now its has a very diverse population now. I dont think I started this topic as Blacks vs Whites or who got up rotted from the third ward 1st but to let people know that third ward and the other wards history is worth keeping. Even in this forum it say the heights is the only place to see the city as it was a 100 years ago. Does houston think the heights history is more important than that of Third Ward?

the city hasn't done much if anything to preserve heights history. the residents have. many in the heights say the same thing is happening there (developers coming in) that is happening in the third ward and other older areas.

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Back in December 2006, I read a NYTimes Article about an arts project that was underway in the Third Ward under the direction of Robert Lowe. At the time I read the article, I knew very little about the Third Ward except for what I gleaned from the article. I've pasted the link to the article that appeared in the NYTimes and another link to an article that first appeared in High Performance. Is anyone familiar with this project? Does anyone know what effect it is having on the Third Ward?

NYTimes article

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/17/arts/design/17kimm.html?

ex=1324011600&en=cb028cf20506be7b&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

High Performance article

http://www.communityarts.net/readingroom/a...in_the_hous.php

Apologies. The man's name is Rick Lowe.

your NYT link appears to be dead however the High performance link is. the Project Row houses are well known. I believe there is a haif link here.

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your NYT link appears to be dead however the High performance link is. the Project Row houses are well known. I believe there is a haif link here.

Don't know why the NYTimes link isn't working as I am able to load it into my browser.

I've pasted it here again. You may have to cut and paste into the browser rather than simply click on it. Alternately, you could google it and see if you can retrieve it that way. Below I have copied when comes up when I google the NYTimes article

<h2 class="r">Project Row Houses - Rick Lowe - - Art - Report - New York Times</h2>In Houston, Art Is Where the Home Is. Michael Stravato for The New York Times ... And the Third Ward could be his canvas. He was inspired by John Biggers, ...

www.nytimes.com/2006/12/17/arts/design/17kimm.html?ex=1324011600&en=cb028cf20506be7b&ei=5088&... - May 30, 2007 - Similar pages - Note this

I would paste in the text of the article but it is several pages long and accompanied by a multimedia slide show.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/17/arts/design/

17kimm.html?ex=1324011600&en=cb028cf20506be7b&ei=

5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

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