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While searching HAR, I've noticed that some listings don't contain an address. This seems rather counter-productive, especially since the location is usually the most important attribute in selling a property. Are the agents trying to force people to call their office to get more information? I would think that this would turn people off to the property; I usually assume that missing information is an attempt to hide something undesirable.

My other pet peeve has to do with the photographs that are used to represent the property. Time and time again, I see homes that are represented by poorly-lit and/or blurry photos. I would think that this is really working to the seller's disadvantage, since the property is not being represented in a manner that highlights it's good points. Not that every property needs to be professionally photographed, but how hard can it be to turn on the lights or open the blinds prior to taking a photo? I also hate it when the subject matter of the photographs is redundant or stupid, rather than informative. All listings should contain photos of the kitchen and bathroom, in my opinion. I really hate it when I see redundant pictures of the front facade, pictures of the street sign, or pictures of the current owners' pets and children, instead of pictures that answer questions, like "Has the kitchen been updated?"

I guess my main point here is that more listing agents need to think in the manner of a home buyer, and they should provide as much information in the listing as they can. The buyer is going to eventuallly find out all of the facts about the property anyway, so it seems like it would save everyone a lot of time if the listing contained as much information as possible. Some agents need to ask themselves more questions like "Is this blurry picture of the hot water heater going to help sell this house?" The answer will most likely be "NO!"

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Time and time again, I see homes that are represented by poorly-lit and/or blurry photos. I would think that this is really working to the seller's disadvantage, since the property is not being represented in a manner that highlights it's good points.
  1. I can't agree more.
  2. I'm for hire.

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While searching HAR, I've noticed that some listings don't contain an address. This seems rather counter-productive, especially since the location is usually the most important attribute in selling a property. Are the agents trying to force people to call their office to get more information? I would think that this would turn people off to the property; I usually assume that missing information is an attempt to hide something undesirable.

My other pet peeve has to do with the photographs that are used to represent the property. Time and time again, I see homes that are represented by poorly-lit and/or blurry photos. I would think that this is really working to the seller's disadvantage, since the property is not being represented in a manner that highlights it's good points. Not that every property needs to be professionally photographed, but how hard can it be to turn on the lights or open the blinds prior to taking a photo? I also hate it when the subject matter of the photographs is redundant or stupid, rather than informative. All listings should contain photos of the kitchen and bathroom, in my opinion. I really hate it when I see redundant pictures of the front facade, pictures of the street sign, or pictures of the current owners' pets and children, instead of pictures that answer questions, like "Has the kitchen been updated?"

I guess my main point here is that more listing agents need to think in the manner of a home buyer, and they should provide as much information in the listing as they can. The buyer is going to eventuallly find out all of the facts about the property anyway, so it seems like it would save everyone a lot of time if the listing contained as much information as possible. Some agents need to ask themselves more questions like "Is this blurry picture of the hot water heater going to help sell this house?" The answer will most likely be "NO!"

I have a ZIP Realty account, which can be set up for free. One thing I have noticed, if you see a property on har.com that does not have an address, if you enter the MLS number from har.com into the ZIP realty account, it will pull up the property address.

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Dan,

I'm an agent myself mainly for personal real estate deals and helping friends purchase homes. However having disclosed that I can't agree with you more, hence why 10% of the agents earn 90% of the dollars out there.

I once purchased a foreclosure that had one picture of the front and one picture of grass in the back but did not show any of the structure of the back. So fence and grass. It was on the market for a long time and I just happened to be driving in the general area one day and decided to do a drive by. I stopped and then called in a showing with CSS and opened the door. Turns out that darn house was completely redone inside. Beautiful molding, new kitchen and bathroom, built in book shelf and entertainment center, new flooring, etc.... Great house that only needed a new garage door, some appliances, and to be relisted which I did. I haggled the bank down on it too but to this day I

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When getting a condo or townhome, if the actual dwelling is so-so, they ALWAYS seem to focus on the common areas, especially the pool area if it is nicely landscaped, or other ammenties that are not really related to the home you are purchasing.

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Even worse is when they put it on the MLS with no pictures and finally do put some a couple days later. By then, it's often too late for a good first impression.

flipper

Don't even pull my cord on this one. So many times I may end up missing a good MCM b/c they list the style as "traditional" and don't put a photo up right away. Like many agents I check the new listings report daily, but if there isn't a picture, you pass over it.

I always put photos of my own up immediately and then replace them with ones done professionally. I sometimes add to the 10 or 12 professional photos with a couple of my own since you can put up to 16 pictures. To me that is so incredibly important, even if the house is plain or whatever. I have/had some listings that were not model homes by any stretch, but you need to make the best presentation possible. The ones that don't put any interior pictures or even worse, the WRONG interior photos just slay me. There is one on Glenview right now in Glenbrook that has a great interior with lots of poured terrazzo, but the agency has photos of the interior of a completely different house altogether.

Some people do try, but with the right photography even subtle differences can make a world of improvement on the presentation.

Here are some side by side examples on ones I did vs. other agent's photography of the same house, that to me at least, show how much better a house can look with the right pics.

Glenbrook colonial

7642 Glen Prairie

Glenbrook tudor

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Don't even pull my cord on this one. So many times I may end up missing a good MCM b/c they list the style as "traditional" and don't put a photo up right away. Like many agents I check the new listings report daily, but if there isn't a picture, you pass over it.

I always put photos of my own up immediately and then replace them with ones done professionally. I sometimes add to the 10 or 12 professional photos with a couple of my own since you can put up to 16 pictures. To me that is so incredibly important, even if the house is plain or whatever. I have/had some listings that were not model homes by any stretch, but you need to make the best presentation possible. The ones that don't put any interior pictures or even worse, the WRONG interior photos just slay me. There is one on Glenview right now in Glenbrook that has a great interior with lots of poured terrazzo, but the agency has photos of the interior of a completely different house altogether.

Some people do try, but with the right photography even subtle differences can make a world of improvement on the presentation.

Here are some side by side examples on ones I did vs. other agent's photography of the same house, that to me at least, show how much better a house can look with the right pics.

Glenbrook colonial

7642 Glen Prairie

Glenbrook tudor

wow. those pictures make a world of difference. I'm always blown away at how some Realtors take the ugliest and blurry pictures. Pictures like yours make buyers take a second look at the home.

What type of camera, lighting, exposure do you use. Or do you hire pros?

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What about the pics you click on and they don't get any bigger. Large clear pics are not that much to ask for that 3% you are getting. I want to see the backyard, I consider it one of the most important parts of the home. I want to know what year the a/c and heater are, are the water pipes copper, plastic or galvenized, what are the HOA fees, how long has the previous owner been there and what work has been done on the house. Copies of the disclosures should be available in the home. It seems to me a real estate agent is just a middle man, someone to show the house so you don't have to say anything about it. If you want to sell your home take the time to write up some history on it and find an agent who is willing to make the information available instead of just saying I dont know.

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Perhaps someone more in touch with the business can answer this one:

How come the ultracheap housing isn't listed? There are hard-core slum areas of Houston where houses go for very little.

But "very little" is a relative term. People will advertise a used refrigerator for $40, but not a $20k shotgun shack. Seems like an untapped market to me.

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Perhaps someone more in touch with the business can answer this one:

How come the ultracheap housing isn't listed? There are hard-core slum areas of Houston where houses go for very little.

But "very little" is a relative term. People will advertise a used refrigerator for $40, but not a $20k shotgun shack. Seems like an untapped market to me.

I'm not an expert on this by any measure, but I suspect it's because the commission isn't there. The agents would rather concentrate on the houses that are going to make them the most money.

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I'm not an expert on this by any measure, but I suspect it's because the commission isn't there. The agents would rather concentrate on the houses that are going to make them the most money.

Yeah, usually when a property that is that inexpensive comes onto the market, commission is insufficient to entice a Realtor, so the seller either has to pay them a flat fee that is much higher as a percentage of the value of the property than is typical. Advertising exposure also carries a similar problem because it costs just as much to advertise a $20k home in any given venue as it does to advertise a $200k home.

The end result is that most homes at this value trade under the radar of anybody. On a related note, slumlording is a really good way to make money. ;)

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The only advertising homes need this days is an MLS listing on the internet with pics. Think how much harder agents had to work in the old days and how much more control they had. They would just not bother to show or tell you about the ones they wouldn't get a good commision on.

You don't need an agent to find you a house anymore, you just need them to unlock the door. When you call the agent that the house is listed with they don't know or want to give you any information up front. I think they are way overpaid for what they do these days.

Yeah, usually when a property that is that inexpensive comes onto the market, commission is insufficient to entice a Realtor, so the seller either has to pay them a flat fee that is much higher as a percentage of the value of the property than is typical. Advertising exposure also carries a similar problem because it costs just as much to advertise a $20k home in any given venue as it does to advertise a $200k home.

The end result is that most homes at this value trade under the radar of anybody. On a related note, slumlording is a really good way to make money. ;)

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