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Conducting some research on the East End neighborhood Forest Hill. Can anyone tell me what Forest Hill is experiencing now? (Homeowners vs Renters, crime, flooding, traffic, home values) Is it going through a revitalization? Is it really that bad that it's next to a cemetery? Diversity mix? I appreciate the feedback.

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Conducting some research on the East End neighborhood Forest Hill. Can anyone tell me what Forest Hill is experiencing now? (Homeowners vs Renters, crime, flooding, traffic, home values) Is it going through a revitalization? Is it really that bad that it's next to a cemetery? Diversity mix? I appreciate the feedback.

Don't know much about the stats, but I would think this to be a somewhat ideal situation, to be next to the cemeteries (south & west) and the park. At least you know development won't encroach on your space too much. Don't believe flooding is an issue on that side, know Idylwood had issues in the last few yrs. along the banks of their neighborhood. That 'hood is layed out so nicely, wide streets, curb appeal.

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Conducting some research on the East End neighborhood Forest Hill. Can anyone tell me what Forest Hill is experiencing now? (Homeowners vs Renters, crime, flooding, traffic, home values) Is it going through a revitalization? Is it really that bad that it's next to a cemetery? Diversity mix? I appreciate the feedback.

LTAWACS should know, I think that person/s live in that nabe. :)

It is mostly middle class 3rd/4th generation Hispanic some white collar. Most homes are well kept up. Its up there with Idylwood. I have an aunt that owns at least 3 homes there but only rents to professionals. What I don't like is it is just a hop skip from that bridge that connects to Harrisburg and thats not good. I am surprised it wasn't gated off years ago or at least in to the Forest Hill subdivision. For those with children, unfortunately I would not even think of sending my child to these schools the have been so under served by the power that be for ages. The fact that the cemetery is right there is a real positive. The dead wont bother you, it's the "living" that will. The other thing that I would not like if I lived here is having to cross Wayside to access 45 (fastest way to and fro) Wayside becomes gridlock so its best to go over to Sunnyland :blush: or whatever to get around Wayside backup. Just buy a nice little pad in Sunnyland or the hood behind Dinner Bell cafeteria. You 'll be glad you did...minus the guilt.

Edited by Vertigo58
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It is mostly middle class 3rd/4th generation Hispanic some white collar. Most homes are well kept up. Its up there with Idylwood.

WTF? Most of the homes in Forest Hill are dilapidated roach infested dumps stuffed in WAY too close to the street and WAY too close together. There are some nice, well maintained houses in there, and a few blocks on a few streets are bordering on decent, but overall it can't touch Idylwood with a 10 foot pole. Iylwood is SUPER nice. 95% of the homes in there are VERY well kept. My money would be on Idylwood....WAY WAY better 'hood for not too much more money.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I lived in the house for about a year. It was an amazing place. When we bought it the home had been occupied by a hermit and a horder. He had an entire room full of national geographics and the whole place smelled like cat.

The house was amazing. I wish I had pictures, I actually found this board looking for a picture to show a friend. The basement was just a concrete floor with wood paneling that would leak whenever it rained. Our laundry room and pool table were down there and I stayed in the basement during the summer after my freshman year. There was a door to the crawl space. It was just a creepy basement. The foundation was on piers and floated about 4 feet above the ground level. The first floor had a huge kitchen, dining room, library and what we called the trophy room. The trophy room had linoleum over wood floors that could not be removed. It had plaster walls and the ceiling throughout the place were 10-12 feet. The 2 downstairs bedrooms were not part of the original plan. They were once the front half of the downstairs and were a ballroom. It wasn't until WWI and WWII when they started boarding people that the house took the shape it has now. The front door was a tiffany crystal door. It opened into the foyer that led to a grand stair case that led to an open second floor. The 6 bedrooms upstairs were along all the outside walls. The center was a huge opening. The back two rooms that were seperated by one bathroom and the back staircase were very small as were the middle. The middle two rooms had doors to the balconies on the side of the second floors. They also had fireplaces that were shared on both sides of the walls with the front rooms. The upstairs balcony was off limits, as were all the balconies for insurance reasons, yet we only had to unscrew on screw and we were there.

It was an amazing view and one would only wonder what that view looked like 100 years ago looking at the bayou. There was a back house that only the second floor was livable. There was also a 4 car garage that had been added after the fact. I loved living there. The wood floors were original and made ornate decorations throughout. The library had the most amazing floors and timber beamed ceilings with 98 foot hard wood paneling. There was also a tiffany glass dome at the center of the ceiling on the second floor that lit up in the day and the night with the help of a light.

we had a haunted house in 1995 with Zeta Tau Alpha because we were on probation and could not throw a party but we could throw a philanthropy event. so we had a sorority over for a month and had a party. All proceeds for 3 years went to the AHA. We raised almost 4k the last year, 1997, when I built the haunted house. The place was amazing and i dearly miss it. If anyonehas any questions please feel free to email me at ianpblake@gmail.com

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Yeah, thnx for that personal account, I just know someone important built that house...would love to know who. Wow, a ballroom. (My great-grandmother's bungalow only had a "parlor", with glass doors, behind large drapes). So many of these giant homes were bulldozed, nice to know it's still there. The owner seems to be taking care of it, somewhat. I can remember where several Victorian mansions lile this one once stood.

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  • 3 weeks later...
WTF? Most of the homes in Forest Hill are dilapidated roach infested dumps stuffed in WAY too close to the street and WAY too close together. There are some nice, well maintained houses in there, and a few blocks on a few streets are bordering on decent, but overall it can't touch Idylwood with a 10 foot pole. Iylwood is SUPER nice. 95% of the homes in there are VERY well kept. My money would be on Idylwood....WAY WAY better 'hood for not too much more money.

Eh, it's not that bad... I think Forest Hill's biggest negative is the mishmash of architectural styles & construction quality in the housing stock. Some of the houses are complete tear-downs, while others are very nice. Yeah, it's not Idylwood, but you can get a much larger yard in Forest Hill. Plus, you don't have to worry about flooding from the bayou.

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  • 6 months later...

I too lived in the house from 2002 until it was sold in 2003. Early in the post it was mentioned that the Civic Association forced the Fraternity out of Forrest Hill. While I'm sure there was pressure due to the use of the house, there were actually many factors that led to the group relocating to the UH Main Campus under their own will. I can attest that the last few groups of gentlemen that lived in the house did everything they possibly could to keep up the dilapidated house. Unfortunately 10 college-aged amateur contractors with limited resources could not win the battle over the old house.

As for the long standing "history" of the house: The story I was always told is the President of the Union Pacific Railroad had it built in 1910 as a venue to entertain. I have no way of validating this theory, only that it was widely accepted among those that lived in the house when it served as our Fraternity's residence.

Ian is spot on with his description of the interior of the house. The downstairs originally served as a open ballroom with industrial kitchen. It is still evident by the original wood floor inlays that lead right up to a demising wall and carry through to the other side. The most striking feature of the house was the 10ft wide Tiffany glass dome that separated the foyer from the attic. It was made up of 6-8 panels and unfortunately, several were stolen as the house sat vacant during the transition of ownership.

I actually have quite a collection of pictures of the exterior and interior I would be glad to share. I'll be sure to post them soon.

-Travis (not the frat guy in his underwear outside)

Edited by tscott1633
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  • 3 weeks later...

There is something in the architectural guide to Houston about those two, the big colonial and the Spanish one, but I can't lay my hands on my copy. Can somebody look those up?...

I went to Milby in the early 1950

There was a boy name Jarone Johnson that lived in this house with his Mother & Father Mr Johnson was A Doctor At the time Jarone went to Austin Hi in the early 1950

said it was his grand father House " Can we trust a boy name Jarone "

RACEHORSE East end to the end Milby class 1954

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  • 2 months later...

I didn't know the Union Pacific was in Houston in 1910. It had to have been someone with money though. Does Forest Hill date back to then?

But, would HCAD offices over on 290 have hard copy records on that house?

I think the railroad owner story makes a lot of sense, with Harrisburg located so close by. But I haven't found any solid proof of it. That house dates to around the same time frame, very early 1900's. And with the Country Club moving to that area around the same time, I can see why that house was built there. I've tried researching different railroad magnates on the Handbook of Texas On-line source to no avail. The HCAD offices on 290 would be the next logical step.

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  • 2 months later...

This book is from year 1913, pdf. file, pg./ pic. 72, picture of houses in Forest Hill... http://www.archive.o...assetting00mont

see Index - pg. 153 (no.72 for F. Hill) for description of photos.

The wooded scenes were right after the entrance of Forest Hill from Harrisburg Blvd, around 72, 73rd sts. You apparently went thru the wooded scenery, and over the bayou to get there. There were only a few houses, originally.

--says the owners were M.C. Cooke & M.C. Lane. Cooke built the mission style on Pasadena st. for himself.

--Directories say Lane was a lawyer, (full name in directory is M. Cornell Lane), residence Buena Vista Av., Forest Hill (where is Buena Vista?), could not find that st.? , could they have mean't Alta Vista? The house sits on Pasadena. St.

--The name Radetzki is associated w/ the mansion in Cite article, Issue 69, Wayside(what a great one, BTW). Pg.2, picture further down in article.

http://citemag.org/w...oush_Cite69.pdf

--Directories say Gus Radezski was propr. (proprietor, I'm guessing) of Forestdale Nurseries. Directory address is Pasadena St.

--Forest Hill - developed in 1910.

Edited by NenaE
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I looked at those photos again in the 1913 book, enlarged. I mis-interpreted them.

Sorry guys, Gus Radetzki did own the mansion (as stated in the Cite article). Didn't really think Ben Koush would be wrong. The lawyer's home is seen in the first photo, next to the mission-style one. There must be a second house next to the mansion in the bottom photo, who's owner was L. Dunn. Wow, never would have thought that...an owner of a nursery business, not a lawyer, with a house like that.

here's how it reads in the Index:

72- Beautiful Forest Hill; Homes of W.A. Cooke and M.C. Lane, first picture; last picture, Gus Radetzki and Lindsay Dunn."

73-Bungalow Headquarters Forestdale Nurseries".

P.S. there's some great photos of other neighborhoods and first apts. in this one, check it out.

Edited by NenaE
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Gus Radetzki is listed in the 1908-09 Directory as General Superintendent for the H.&T.C., H.E.& WT and H Rys. (Railways)

office/ Grand Central Station, residence 1718 Polk ave.

That's probably the link to the "railroad - mansion owner" story mentioned in earlier posts to this topic.

Edited by NenaE
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Thanks for sharing your research, Nenae. However, the photos pose another question - it appears that Mr Lane's house was reduced from a two-story house to a one-story house at some point. I wonder why? Hurricane damage? Fire?

Yeah, from my own experiences, it seems research always digs up even more questions. The Buena Vista address, for instance. One idea is that maybe in the beginning there were only two main streets (dirt or shell roads), Alta Vista and Buena Vista (later to be renamed Pasadena?). Or maybe it was a side road, later renamed. But that's pure speculation on my part. Maps from the time don't back up this theory, at all. That one's still bothering me. I don't understand why the Forest Hill Ave. that runs thru the middle of the neighborhood does not flow straight through from the old entrance road, also named Forest Hill Blvd. It's chopped up. Strange.

It's interesting how remote that area was, in the beginning. Too bad the original plan didn't pan out. But it's still very nice, the land and trees are beautiful.

The directory from 1913 shows:

Lane, M. Cornell (Attorney), r. Buena Vista ave. Forest Hill add. 2

Dunn, Lindsey H., investments, 1020 Union Nat'l Bank bldg. r. Forest Hill 3

Radetzki, Gus (Forestdale Nurseries), r. Forest Hill add. 7

Radetzki Mary F. (wid Gus), h. Gus Radezski (a later directory shows her name only, with an abbreviation for taking in "boarders". Early years show several relatives, and their occupations. One, Miss Adelaide - maybe a daughter,(from 1919 directory) worked as a steno. (stenographer) for chief surgeon SP Lines hs 2 (house 2) Pasadena Av Forest Hill

(Southern Pacific - railroad link again)

maybe they mean't address, not addition or section name. I'd like to see the original plans. Did Hare & Hare lay it out?

Key definitions:

r = residence

add. = addition

ad. = address

wid = widow

Also, the attorney's house could have been moved, that went on a lot back then.

Edited by NenaE
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I'd like to see the original plans. Did Hare & Hare lay it out?

I'd also like to see the original plans for the neighborhood. I remember reading somewhere (I think it was in that Cite article) that the subdivision originally included the land that became Forest Park Lawndale. The developers sold it to the cemetery when they had difficulty selling the lots to homeowners.

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I'd also like to see the original plans for the neighborhood. I remember reading somewhere (I think it was in that Cite article) that the subdivision originally included the land that became Forest Park Lawndale. The developers sold it to the cemetery when they had difficulty selling the lots to homeowners.

Here is the "original" plat from the county block books. And it does incorporate the land that will become the cemetery.

http://books.tax.hctx.net/v014/003493.JPG

Notice that the original lot sizes are huge when compared to the 1928 re-plat. Looks like each original lot was split into about 3 new lots. Example below:

http://books.tax.hctx.net/v014/003499.JPG

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Here is the "original" plat from the county block books. And it does incorporate the land that will become the cemetery.

http://books.tax.hct...v014/003493.JPG

Notice that the original lot sizes are huge when compared to the 1928 re-plat. Looks like each original lot was split into about 3 new lots. Example below:

http://books.tax.hct...v014/003499.JPG

Thanks gnu, I've never seen that first block book, before.

Now I'm wondering who the original investors were.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Gus Radetzki is listed in the 1908-09 Directory as General Superintendent for the H.&T.C., H.E.& WT and H Rys. (Railways)

office/ Grand Central Station, residence 1718 Polk ave.

That's probably the link to the "railroad - mansion owner" story mentioned in earlier posts to this topic.

Thanks so much for all this information, it's amazing to me that there is so much "out there".

The railroad link to the Pasadena St. house makes much more sense to me now. The H&TC (to Hearne) and the HEWT (to Lufkin)were later part of the Southern Pacific. I just couldn't place the Union Pacific in Houston as early as 1910. Union Pacific did acquire the Missouri Pacific but that was much later. But I agree, it probably does explain the 'railroad owner' comments.

Now, was it the same Gus who owned the nursery?

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  • 3 years later...

This house is getting a nice coat of white paint, now. Looks good.

It still takes my breath away.

 

Re: 1766 Pasadena

 

This thread died three years ago, but perhaps someone is still interested.  I dated one of the "animal house" boys for years, and not everyone was blind to the beauty and potential of the home.  Lots of great memories there, just never enough money to do what needed to be done.  There was a main staircase, a steep and scary back stair case, stained glass in a cuppola (oddly roofed over) if I recall correctly, the kitchen was falling apart...

 

Back in the early 90s, all underwear running was confined to the actual property, and we didn't dare park on the street. ;)

 

Thank you to everyone who posted about the history of the house.  It's a testement to its beauty that 20 years later, I still enjoy reading about it.

 

eta: We were told the house had been built by a "railroad baron".  Non-factual, but lends to existing research.

Edited by emvs73
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  • 8 months later...

My great-grandfather worked for the Houston East & West Texas railroad, and often was a guest at 1766 Pasadena when he was in Houston from Lufkin - although, I believe back in that day, the address was actually 2 Pasadena Street.  Mr. Gus Radetski built the home.  He was the general superintendent and assistant general manager for the Houston & Texas Central, the Houston East & West Texas (HE & WT), and the Houston & Shreveport line.  I suppose that would qualify him as a Baron.

 

I toured the house several years ago (2004, I believe) when it was for sale by the Fraternity, and happened to snap a few pictures of the interior.  Even after all the years and people, it was still magnificent.  I only hope the current owner is taking good care of it all.

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Edited by RiversideT
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Interesting that a Polish (or Russian?) man had such a high position in the business world back then, especially in Texas. Great stories on here. I hope whoever owns this gives it protected landmark designation or it will go the way similar homes have gone.

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Interesting that a Polish (or Russian?) man had such a high position in the business world back then, especially in Texas. 

 

Not that surprising, in light of the fact that most of central and south Texas was settled by Bavarian, Polish, Czech, and other central European immigrants, with plenty of Mexican heritage as one goes south.  Galveston was one of the larger immigration ports of entry back in the day.  That said, according to the article, Mr. Radetski was at least second generation American.

 

One of my brothers raised his kids in Bellville - I remember wondering if I could buy a vowel when looking over the high school graduation programs.

 

FWIW, "-ski" is usually Polish heritage, "-sky" is typically Russian.

Edited by mollusk
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Not that surprising, in light of the fact that most of central and south Texas was settled by Bavarian, Polish, Czech, and other central European immigrants, with plenty of Mexican heritage as one goes south. Galveston was one of the larger immigration ports of entry back in the day. That said, according to the article, Mr. Radetski was at least second generation American.

One of my brothers raised his kids in Bellville - I remember wondering if I could buy a vowel when looking over the high school graduation programs.

FWIW, "-ski" is usually Polish heritage, "-sky" is typically Russian.

I am aware of the Polish, Czech, and German settlements in Texas; my family comes from Polish and German Texas roots. What is unusual is that a Polish person should have, as I said, "such a high position" as this guy did. Most immigrants at that time were lower on the totem pole, and the big railroad managers were usually Anglo-Saxon or maybe a few Irish.

Also, the bio mentions he was from New Orleans and his father from D.C., so not a Texan. How many Poles (or Russians) were in DC in the mid-1800's, when his father would have been born? Not many. Must have been an unusual family.

I believe the Russian ending can be spelled with an i or y, since the actual letter is Cyrillic. Y is more common, true, but then the z instead of s before the k seems more Russian than Polish. I could be wrong.

Edited by H-Town Man
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Actually, I know a little about the Radetski family.  The father, Gustave H. Radetski, was born in Russia.  I can only surmise that the writer of the older bio either did not know, or he wanted to "americanize" the family by making the senior Radetski born somewhere in the United States.  He did move to Texas, and served as a Second Lieutenant in the 2nd Texas Cavalry in 1862.  In 1863, he was promoted to First Lieutenant, and transferred to the 1st Texas Cavalry before being mustered out in 1865.  His son, Gustave L. Radetski was actually born in Brownsville, while his father was still in the service.  The family did end up in New Orleans.  I'll share with you the text from a news article from the Brownsville Daily Herald of September 6, 1905:  

 

"A Brownsville Boy:  Gus Radetski rode from Brownsville to Fort Clark, when a boy, on a Burro.  

 

A dispatch from Houston says:  Speaking of men who had won position by stering (sp) merit in the railroad world today, Judge J. L. Cox, land agent of the Southern Pacific, and W. L. Lane, chief clerk in Mr. W. G. Van Vleck's office, said that Gus Radetski, chief clerk in Vice President Fay's office, deserves a great deal of praise.  He was born at Brownsville, where he lived with his parents till the outbreak of the war.  He then went to Fort Clark where he joined the army.  He rode there on a burro alone, and he was still only a boy.  The ride was fraught with many dangers and thrilling experiences.  The country was full of Indians, many of whom were hostile to the whites.  Mr. Radetski still has an old-fashioned flint-lock pistol which he took with him on this trip.  He joined the army there as a private, and served through the war.  After the war, he went with his father to New Orleans where the senior Radetski went into the commission business.  While there, Gus fell in love, as young men will sometimes do, with a pretty young girl (Miss Mary Georgiana Taylor).  He left New Orleans to to go to Louisville, where he stayed for several years, then returned and married the pretty girl (1889).  He went into the railroad work in New Orleans in a ticket office, and gradually rose till he became chief clerk, the positions he now fills.  He is in line for promotion to better positions; in fact has been offered more lucrative positions, but prefers to hold the one he now has on account of the agreeableness of it.  

 

Gus Radetski has had many checkered experience, but he has never forgotten his burro ride from Brownsville to Fort Clark.  Judge Cox says he has a very warm place in his hear for burros ever since for obvious reasons."

 

He also was the Director of the Lumbermans National Bank as well as the founder and president of the Forest Hill Nurseries, the largest floral establishment in Houston at the time of his death in 1936.  He was a member of the Country Club, the Houston Club, and the Thalian Club.  He was living at the house on Pasadena Avenue when he passed away.

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Well I'll be, so you just happened to know all about the Radetzki family? Small world. Would you happen to know what kind of family this was that they were here from Russia already in the mid 1800's? Also, were they Jewish? I googled the name and found a Jewish professor from Poland.

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I can't say that I have ever heard that the Radetski family were Jewish.  As none of them are buried in any of the prominent Jewish cemeteries (Beth Israel, Beth Yeshurun, Adath Israel, etc.), I would lean towards thinking they were not Jewish.  

Edited by RiversideT
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I may be reaching here but the fact that they lived so close to Forest Park Cemetery leads me to think that he may be right across Lawndale from his home. 

 

I could not find him on Find A Grave but that only means that no one has posted it.  I don't have any of the genealogy subscriptions to search those sites but there's a good chance information is available on him.

Edited by little frau
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I may be reaching here but the fact that they lived so close to Forest Park Cemetery leads me to think that he may be right across Lawndale from his home. 

 

I could not find him on Find A Grave but that only means that no one has posted it.  I don't have any of the genealogy subscriptions to search those sites but there's a good chance information is available on him.

 

That would be my first guess. Second would be Evergreen, another old one, down the road.

I drove by the house, to take photos, maybe five years ago. The owner had scaffolding up, was repairing the outside. I'm confident it's in good hands.

 

Whoa, RiversideT, those interior shots, nice floor. 

Edited by NenaE
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I'm attaching a couple more photos - one of the back of the house, and one of the detached garage.  Most of the time, we just get to see the front of the house from the street, but on the side, you will notice the porte cochere.  I believe the fraternity had built a deck up since they did not have a carriage to pull through there.   :)  As I remember, the garage was in total need of repair, but I believe it is still there even now.  It's fun to think about the carriage (or old automobile) being readied and brought from the carriage house up to the porte cochere to pick whomever up and take them into the city.

 

By the way, little frau, there is a Findagrave.com listing for Mr. Gustave L. "Gus" Radetski - here is the link:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=97332851

 

As you can see, he is buried in Forest Park, along with his wife and at least a couple of his children.  I know his son Reese Radetski was alive until 1984, but I don't remember where he is buried.

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Edited by RiversideT
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Ah, I see the reason I was unable to find him, I was using the Radetski spelling instead of Radetzki as it is listed on Find A Grave.

 

Interesting too, when following the family links on FAG, the daughter Georgiana Radetzki married Claudius Sears and both are buried in Glenwood.

 

Checking probate records on the county clerk site, there is listed Fay Peters Radetzki who died in 1955 and executor of her estate was Gustave Reese Radetzki.  His address is shown as 606 Southern Pacific Bldg.  The SP Building address was 713 Franklin so I feel that the 606 must have been offices on the 6th floor.  There are no probate records for Gus Reese Radetzki in Harris County.  On Find A Grave the listing for Fay states that she was the wife of G.R. Radetzki.  Fay is buried in Forest Park.

 

A daughter of Gus died in 1975 and is in Forest Park also.  That daughter was Adelaide and the executrix of her estate was Janice Radetzki Cage.

 

Now, what is even more interesting is that in September of 1969 in Riverside Terrace, G.R. Radetzki is listed as Grantor of Lot 23 in Block 36 to the State of Texas as Grantee.

 

With a little more research, I'm sure the address of that house could be found.

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That lot sits under 288 just South of where MacGregor Way comes off of Hermann Deive, East of Almeda. Here's the block book link http://books.tax.hctx.net/v061/AE1997_61-1_0106.jpg. You can see the area on Google Earth rolled back to 1953. It's due East of the Mosaic.

That's interesting. One more mysterious link for the two areas, and people from the Country Club area neighborhoods of Forest Hill & Idylwood. Im talking about the street... N. MacGregor Way. 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 year later...

1766 Pasadena Avenue

 

I was told by the last owning relative that the house and accompanying 100 acres were a gift to the retiring President of Northern and Southern Pacific railroad in 1911. The Houston attorney was born in San Jacinto, Texas and was named Robert Lovett. He imagined the development as the new River Oaks with the Wortham Golf Course adjacent. He married into the Abercrombie family and moved on... see Wikipedia for more on him...

The flood plain areas were developed into the cemetery and Soldier's Rest sits at the peak and bend of Brays Bayou. The site is final home to many of our bravest from the 1920's.

The Great Depression redesigned the 1 acre tracts to smaller homesteads and created garden yards that are 175-200 ft depth for growing victory gardens popular in the wars.

I toured the home from basement to attic and the bevel leaded glass dome over the mahogany staircase sits under the skylight. If I ever get the funding, I will restore it... It deserves it... Truly majestic...

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  • 6 years later...
On 4/11/2009 at 10:03 PM, Dan the Man said:

Eh, it's not that bad... I think Forest Hill's biggest negative is the mishmash of architectural styles & construction quality in the housing stock. Some of the houses are complete tear-downs, while others are very nice. Yeah, it's not Idylwood, but you can get a much larger yard in Forest Hill. Plus, you don't have to worry about flooding from the bayou.

How is the neighborhood now, in 2022? I love the wide and elevated streets but I am concerned about safety. Can anyone tell me if it’s a quiet neighborhood?

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the lots are still large.

Forest Hill Blvd has a bridge over Brays Bayou, which offers great accessibility for people living in the neighborhood to get over to Harrisburg area, but it also offers great access for everyone else too. I think some of that will go away when the 75th street bridge is finished being rebuilt.

I was in the market earlier this year and I spent a few weekend mornings driving through this neighborhood to get a feel for it. if I had found the right house, I'd have had no problem moving into the neighborhood.

don't take my word for it though, if you have the capability, drive through the neighborhood, drive around some of the surrounding areas, do so at random times.

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