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  1. Does anyone know what is planned for the large tract at the former site of Houston Community College on Richmond at Dunlavy? Who is the developer?
  2. Does anyone have anything on this apparently they bought a block of land in Downtown for 55 million Nevermind* found little more information Skanska has purchased four land parcels, including one full city block, totaling about 14,200 square meters in downtown Houston, USA. The seller is a private citizen. The total investment amounts to USD 55 M, about SEK 520 M.Located adjacent to Discovery Green, these four sites are in Houston’s Central Business District and Skanska plans to develop a mix of office, multi-family and retail for the local community.
  3. I heard from someone in the real estate community that this property traded hands. Does anyone know what the new owners plans are? I believe the restaurant depot store has already shut down.
  4. https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/2520-Houston-Ave-Houston-TX/18515967/ 30 condo units with ~17,000 sq feet of retail/office space
  5. The Board of Directors of the American Institute of Architects, Houston passed the following Position Statement at its regular meeting on April 10, 2007. The statement will be presented to the Mayor and City Council tomorrow, April 17, by AIA Houston member Peter Boudreaux, AIA, of Curry Boudreaux Architects. AIA Houston POSITION STATEMENT April 10, 2007 RE: The Center Serving Persons with Mental Retardation Site Lease / Potential Sale The American Institute of Architects, Houston does not support the sale and demolition of the buildings of the Center Serving Persons with Mental Retardation located at 3550 West Dallas. The Center and the City of Houston are in disagreement over the validity of the site lease, where the Center's architecturally significant facilities are located. Invalidation of the lease may result not only in the destruction of the homes of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities but also the demolition of these historically important works of Houston architecture, which anchor a visible site in heart of the city. The current buildings and prominent site comprise first-class urban design and environmentally propitious use of open land, both concepts AIA Houston supports in general. The Center buildings are important examples of the architectural trend called the New Brutalism. They occupy a significant place in the history of Houston architecture, particularly in the wake of the recent demolition of the Houston Independent School District Headquarters on Richmond Avenue. The New Brutalism was a modernist architectural movement inspired by the work of Le Corbusier that flourished internationally from the 1950s to the 1970s. New Brutalist buildings usually are formed with striking repetitive angular geometries and are often constructed of rough, unadorned poured concrete. Howard Barnstone and Eugene Aubry designed the Center for the Retarded (1966), as it was originally called. The Cullen Residence Hall (1978) is the work of S.I. Morris & Associates. These architects are significant in Houston's history and these particular buildings are especially important because they represent a high standard of design in service to a community that has been traditionally under served. The buildings are in good condition and will serve their function for a significantly long future. Together Barnstone & Aubry designed several brilliant Houston buildings such as Rothko Chapel (1971); Guinan Hall, Univ. of St. Thomas (1971); Media Center, Rice University (1970); and 3811 Del Monte (1969). Both architects individually are also well-known for their work. S.I. Morris headed a string of firms (including Morris*Aubry), the successor of which is Morris Architects. The full body of Morris work touches almost all of segments of Houston architecture from the Astrodome (1965) to award-winning skyscrapers, to public buildings such as the Central Library (1975) to small houses. Transactional costs for the Center Serving Persons with Mental Retardation to build a new facility will take away from monies and services that this special needs population urgently requires. The Center for the Retarded, a non-profit organization, invested $7 million (1960's dollars) in the buildings, which probably cannot be recouped (in today's dollars). The $26 million estimated sale price of the land would fund only a portion of the needs for a new facility of comparable size and quality. The cost of comparable new facilities would mirror the inflation rate of the land and construction cost. Loss of this site and its buildings would entail a substantial net loss to the Center and adversely affect its ability to maintain its present level of service. Therefore, because of the outstanding architectural significance of this campus, the Board of Directors of AIA Houston recommends that the City of Houston renew its lease with the Center Serving Persons with Mental Retardation so that the Center may remain in its current location and continue to provide essential services to the citizens of Harris County. Hanover Square
  6. I was just wondering, how far apart are these two developments and do you all thing these two sites could change the perception of Houston as a urban walkable city? Which development do you think has the greatest potential for development? Some say that the KBR site should become a park, but I believe that there could be a much better use for the site. KBR Site Regent Square
  7. Covenant House Texas expanding services https://www.tmc.edu/news/2019/08/covenant-house-texas-expanding-services/
  8. Anybody know anything about this
  9. Ten Oaks is a new project by the Wolff Companies. It will be at the northwest intersection of IH-10 and Barker Cypress: From the website:
  10. Anyone know what's going on next to the Federal Reserve on Allen Pkway?
  11. (Posts moved from Louisiana and Elgin thread) dbigtex56 Well, I don't see anything at all....but here are a couple of pics of the site, I think.http://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/gallery/1201192026/gallery_15_10_2313787.jpghttp://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/gallery/1201192026/gallery_15_10_1200602.jpghttp://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/gallery/1201192026/gallery_15_10_1942120.jpg Here is a small project we've talked about across the street, but I couldn't find the thread. http://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/gallery/1201192026/gallery_15_10_184824.jpg
  12. A lot of rumors about the Montrose HPD (900 block Westheimer) storefront closing, not surprising since HPD Chief Acevedo wasn’t a fan of store front idea. But a neighbor mentioned a developer had bought the entire strip ( Guess Theo’s Will be moving also.)center and a few adjacent lots north on Grant and on Crockett street including a beautifully restored 1920’s home. All for multi use multi-storied building ——included will be the Freed library’s move from Montrose Blvd. Apparently the developer did something charming around 6 th street and Yale in the Heights. Now I wonder if this developer will underwrite the HPD storefront in that development or if someone else will offer rent free space inside Montrose for the storefront to move into. Montrose Collective: https://www.888westheimer.com/
  13. On a just-barely-related note: Many people know that Service Corporation International, the world's largest funeral home company, is headquartered in Houston. What most people don't know is that there is a cafeteria in the basement of their building. Even fewer people know its nickname is "The Coffin Cafe."
  14. The one along Holly Hall crosses freight tracks owned by UP or Houston Belt & Terminal, but the frequency of trains is very low and almost never during the daytime. At night, small trains drop off and pick up cars at the Grocers Supply Co. distribution center on Holcombe, which is where the line currently ends, but that is the only user of the tracks of which I'm aware.
  15. EXCLUSIVE REPORTS From the August 12, 2005 print edition Car dealership gives way to urban infill Jennifer Dawson Houston Business Journal A high-end development mixing retail, residential and possibly office space will soon be parked on an inner-city tract that has been occupied by auto dealerships for the past three decades. Trademark Property Co. is negotiating a long-term ground lease on six acres on Westheimer just west of Mid Lane, which is currently home to a Central Ford dealership. Trademark is the Fort Worth-based developer behind the $100 million Market Street project in The Woodlands. That successful 34-acre development includes 400,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space and 100,000 square feet of office space. Read More...
  16. I noticed a few public notice signs at the apartments at Washington and Waugh announcing an application to redevelop. Anyone have any idea what's up with that?
  17. Name of Development: The Mill Developer: Triten Real Estate Partners Location: 2219 Canal Street General Info: This includes a multi-family building, two freestanding restaurants, and approximately 13,000 SF office building (4 story with restaurant, coffee shop, retail on the ground floor). The multi-family is a 7-Story with 323 Units, equaling approximately 262,000 SF. It includes a restaurant, retail space, fitness area, club, event space, exterior amenity pool deck, fitness lawn, co-working space and parking garage. EDIT: Renderings are of the multi-family portion only. Site plan added for reference. Architects: EDI International Michael Hsu Still in design phase. This is all of the information I have at the moment.
  18. gene posted this in the BLVD Place thread in January... http://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/i...st&p=225944 Now we have this... http://houston.bizjournals.com/houston/sto...html?ana=e_ph#1 Hopefully it's not premature to post this in the Going Up! section.
  19. By NANCY SARNOFF Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle Prime land up for grabs A pair of prime parcels of inner-city real estate is about to change hands for the first time in decades. Apartment developers are in negotiations with the William Dickey estate for six acres of coveted land on Kirby Drive. Gables Residential and the Hanover Co. are lined up to take control of two tracts on the west side of Kirby just south of Westheimer, according to real estate sources. Gables is said to be planning an apartment project on four acres that front Kirby, while Hanover is eyeing two acres just west of the Gables site for a high-rise residential tower. The proposed projects will replace the River Oaks Tennis Club and an adjacent retail center that currently occupy the land. An official from Gables would not comment. Hanover could not be reached. The Dickeys, an old-line Houston family that has owned most of the land along Kirby between Westheimer and West Alabama for more than a century, put the property on the block earlier this year. The family, which has maintained control of much of its land through long-term ground leases, is expected to sell the two acres to Hanover and lease the four acres to Gables. The Dickeys are also looking to lease about two acres on the east side of Kirby, where the now-defunct Hard Rock Cafe and Anthony's restaurant buildings sit. About five years after real estate developer William Dickey died, his family decided to relinquish control of nearly eight acres of land on Kirby. Bids for the property were solicited in May by Wulfe & Co. Of the more than 20 offers that came in, just a few are left standing, said Kenneth Katz of Wulfe & Co. "The site will likely be developed as a mixed-use project by one or more developers," is all Katz will say about the deal. In addition to the land on Kirby, the Dickeys also control long-term ground leases with Whole Foods for its West Alabama supermarket and the Ainbinder Co., which owns the Borders bookstore shopping center across the street.
  20. LS27

    Sawyer Yards

    Looks like Lovett is surprisingly remodeling, and not tearing down, an old warehouse near washington, on Sawyer/Edwards, right along the railroad tracks. http://www.lovettcommercial.com/Detail.aspx?idwebarea=36&webid=159 Im sure it's not news to many, but it now looks like the are actually doing some construction there. Anyone have any pictures or know any additional info such as possible tenants?
  21. I was walking around Rice Village recently (pushing a stroller) and noted how poor some of the streets/curbs and infrastructure appeared. There are numerous areas where the curbs have no ramps and you are literally forced to walk in the street or through parking lots. This is really surprising to me given the number of young families with children in the immediate area, and the proximity to the medical center (and thus likely use by people in wheelchairs.) The village is really one of the major 'public faces' of Houston to the outside world, likely to be visited by out of town families of Rice university students, and out of town medical center patients and families (I see the shuttle buses from the medical center hotels dropping them off frequently.) As such, I really can't understand the lack of investment in the roads and curbs in the village area and I'm really surprised someone hasn't brought an ADA lawsuit. Are sidewalks and curbs in commercial areas the responsibility of the city or the property owner to maintain?
  22. Article today on a development in east Montrose from the Montrose management district http://montrosedistrict.org/new-redevelopment-project-planned-for-east-montrose/
  23. Spec's is coming to Montrose!! Montrose and Westheimer next to Half Price Books in the shopping center on the corner to be exact. The space has stood empty for a while. Recently I walked past the unoccupied location and noticed a wall of coolers had been installed, my first thought was grocery store, but today on my way home, a sign company had plastered a paper layout on the wall so that they could install the electrical part of a new sign, I drove by slowly and barely made out the name of the infamous Rabbit's home!! Spec's Liquor Warehouse. Let's get our drinks on Montrose!
  24. Drewery Place, Phase I: Phase II (now known as Laneways Midtown) : https://skyrisecities.com/database/projects/district
  25. http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/3047139 Feb. 19, 2005, 12:40AM Developers have ideas for Imperial land By NANCY SARNOFF and ERIC HANSON Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle The sprawling Imperial Sugar refinery, once the center of Sugar Land's economic and social life, is being sold to developers who hope to return it to that status with a project mixing condominiums, single-family homes and retail space. On Friday, Imperial Sugar announced that it reached a preliminary agreement with a partnership of Cherokee Investment Partners and W.C. Perry Land Development to buy the 160-acre Fort Bend County property. "We'll be turning a blight on the community into something more viable and preserving the historic nature of the sight," said W.C. Perry's Will Perry, the son of well-known residential developer Bob Perry of Perry Homes. The elder Perry is not involved. Ultimately, this proposed development could include much more than the old sugar refinery. Perry said the groups will try to acquire a 550-acre tract of state-owned land northwest of the property and redevelop the entire parcel. The prospect of redevelopment is a relief to area residents who have been concerned about living next door to an empty and decaying industrial complex. "I think, for the most part, most people are very excited to know there will be something there instead of a vacant factory with a lot of buildings that need to be demolished. It's looking pretty tacky right now," said Kristin Lytle, who founded the Friends of Old Sugar Land. Perry sees the central feature in the proposed development as something similar to San Antonio's River Walk or The Woodlands Waterway. Oyster Creek runs through the property. Plans are still very preliminary, however, as the group hasn't yet struck a deal with the state on the additional acreage or closed on the Imperial Sugar property. The developers won't discuss the terms or additional details about the proposed project until it is further along. Their deal to buy the Imperial Sugar property could close by year-end, but they must complete a detailed review. Other groups have looked at the sugar refinery site, but it goes back to the early 1900s, and Cherokee's experience in redeveloping old industrial plants helped get the attention of Imperial Sugar executives. The Raleigh, N.C.-based real estate firm buys contaminated properties like old manufacturing and refining sites, cleans up any environmental damage and sells or develops them in partnerships. In 2003, Cherokee closed a $620 million fund
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