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  1. 85-unit affordable housing complex to sit behind Hanover Hermann Park https://www.houstontx.gov/council/committees/housing/20190917/housingdept.pdf
  2. State board approves demolition of senior living facility at 2100 Memorial https://communityimpact.com/houston/heights-river-oaks-montrose/city-county/2019/09/05/2100-memorial-demolition/
  3. 114 unit affordable senior living complex https://www.houstontx.gov/council/committees/housing/20190917/housingdept.pdf
  4. 6-Story expansion planned at Jackson & W. Gray St. Currently on the planning commission agenda.
  5. This thread was originally created April 2016. I'm reposting this because this post and other content from me are no longer available on the forum. The original thread is archived here: page 1, page 2. 2403 Caroline Street in Midtown, Houston.
  6. https://www.virtualbx.com/construction-preview/houston-housing-authority-partners-with-california-developer-on-two-multifamily-projects/
  7. Possibly a thread about this already? I recognize the developer. Change Happens in Third Ward. https://www.changehappenstx.org/
  8. Located at 5612 S. Rice near Glenmont. https://thebrownstonegroup.net/developments/ Developments listed below are either complete or under construction. They are listed based on their completion date (or placed in service date) or the date that they are planned for completion.
  9. Sits outside the TMC W. Leland Anderson Campus and Levit Green on Dixie road. https://houstontx.gov/housing/publiclegal/notices/2020/07/PGM-MULTIFAMILY_DEVELOPMENTS_JULY_2020_CDBG_DR-E-071720.pdf Loopnet listing: https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/3232-Dixie-Dr-Houston-TX/8356546/
  10. St. Elizabeth's Place Phase II (Building is located at 4514 Lyons Avenue, Houston, Texas. The site area is 1.09 acres, adjacent to St. Elizabeth's Place Phase I (Building A - Historic). St. Elizabeth's Place consists of new construction of a 5 story structure of approximately 133,000 SF for 94 affordable rental dwelling units; level 4 amenity/pool deck, courtyard and 129 onsite parking spaces in an attached/embedded 3 level parking structure. • Garage: 54,797 SF • Gross Residential: 78,204 SF OWNER: Fifth Ward Community Redevelopment Corporation
  11. "On a statewide level, the TDHCA awarded $81.6 million in tax credits to a total of 71 affordable housing developments, including 10 in Houston. Another proposed project in the area that submitted an application to the TDHCA – a 180-unit complex called The Ella planned for 1718 W. 26th St. – was not awarded a tax credit." https://theleadernews.com/topfeature/dian-street-villas-project-awarded-housing-tax-credit/
  12. http://www.laidesigngroup.com/single-post_coleman_center.html
  13. The NHP Foundation received a $1.5M annual allocation of 9% credits from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs to construct 149 units of permanent affordable housing in Houston’s Midtown neighborhood. Additionally, the city of Houston Department of Housing and Community Development has allocated $15M through its Harvey Multifamily Program. The project is also being considered for funding by the Harris County Community Services Department. Magnificat Houses Inc. is providing the land and is NHPF's partner in the development. The property, located at 3300 Caroline St., will contain 149 rental units, recreational amenities and space for the supportive services. In addition, 20% of 3300 Caroline's units will be set aside for formerly homeless people who have gone through transitional housing programs such as Magnificat's and are willing to become the equivalent of college resident advisers.
  14. https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Coming-to-Greenspoint-A-77-million-325-unit-16314845.php The city on Wednesday approved a $15 million loan to help finance a 325-unit affordable housing complex near the Greenspoint Mall, by far the largest project in the city’s Harvey recovery program and one officials hope will help revitalize the area. City Council unanimously voted in favor of the forgivable loan. TXZNH, LLC, will not have to repay the principal amount but will pay 1-percent annual interest on it for 40 years. The Zieben Group is leading the development, which is called Summit at Renaissance Park and will replace a vacant Sears Auto Center near the mall. The four-story housing project will reserve all of its 325 units for low-to-moderate income tenants for 40 years, and the availability of four-bedroom units will help appeal to families in the area, housing officials said. “Greenspoint is one of the most densely populated areas in the entire city, so there’s a lot of need for this type of product,” said Lee Zieben, the head developer. The idea is to offer residents who live in flood-prone housing safe, stable alternatives in the neighborhood, said Ray Miller, assistant director of the city’s Housing and Community Development Department. There are 5,000 nearby households in the floodway, Miller said, and the developer will be required to market the units toward those residents. City officials are hoping the project will lead to more development near the mall, which has lagged in recent years with high vacancy rates. “The Greenspoint Mall is the highest, and safest, and most accessible area in that (neighborhood),” Miller said. “It’s creating a very viable alternative for people who may be living in areas that are flood-prone.” The money backing the city’s investment comes from a $1.3 billion infusion of federal housing relief Houston received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development after Hurricane Harvey, about a third of which it has reserved for replenishing multifamily housing. Most of the deals in the city’s pipeline have funded complexes with around 115 units. This project presented a much larger opportunity, Miller said. “It’s more than double the size of many of the deals,” Miller said. The city’s $15 million investment matches what it has put toward many other deals, but the total cost of the project — $77 million — is much higher than the others, which have averaged $33 million. The rest of this project’s financing is coming from low-income housing tax credits received from the state and conventional debt. “We’re leveraging that money in a good way,” Miller said. Council approval came despite hesitancy from District B Councilmember Tarsha Jackson, who represents Greenspoint. She said the developer did not engage her office or the community before seeking approval on its plans. Jackson said she was not able to speak with Zieben until Tuesday, the day before the vote. “It was frustrating because the developer never reached out to me,” said Jackson. “I know there’s a lot of activity happening with Greenspoint… I’m clueless to the developments.” Zieben said he met often with Jackson’s predecessor, Jerry Davis, while developing the project. Davis remained in the District B seat while the election to replace him was delayed by court battles for more than a year. Jackson took office last December. Jackson said stakeholders in the neighborhood that she spoke with — such as Green House International Church, and a boxing group in the Mall — were similarly left in the dark. Mayor Sylvester Turner assured Jackson and other district council members that he would pull deals from the agenda in the future if developers do not engage them. The council member said she wants to ensure there are other community benefits in the Greenspoint agreement, which could include funds to help the district curb illegal dumping, money to pay for police overtime patrols in the area, and other investments. Zieben said he shares Jackson’s focus on those benefits. Jackson ultimately voted for the project. “That area was hit hard during the Tax Day Flood, the Memorial Day Flood, and even Harvey,” Jackson said. “There’s a need for fresh apartments in the area, and a need for development.” The complex would reserve all of its units for people making less than 60 percent of the area median income, which would be $47,520 for a Houston family of four, or $33,300 for an individual. Some of the units will be set aside for people making 50 or 30 percent of the AMI, as well. The council also approved up to $40 million in bonds for the project, a requirement because it received housing tax credits from the state. A private investor will buy those bonds. dylan.mcguinness@chron.com
  15. https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/c48a167c25b34b91aab2aedd56636624?cover=false
  16. 5.50 acres at 4828 N Shepherd Dr. https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/4828-N-Shepherd-Dr-Houston-TX/7361727/ https://www.dakotaprop.com/coming-soon Demolition permit issued for one of the industrial buildings.
  17. http://www.ccppi.org/site/index.php/initiatives/initiatives-2
  18. TDHCA recommended a 120-unit multi-family development for housing tax credits at 8506 Hempstead just south of 11th. It's the 2.6-ac. vacant lot at the curve. Here's a link with site plans, and info: https://www.tdhca.state.tx.us/multifamily/docs/imaged/2018challenges/18254.pdf Three levels of apartments on top of one level of parking.
  19. Not really sure how far along this is. Just sharing what I saw on Facebook.
  20. New Hope just closed on 1.5 acres last week in the East End to build its first (and Houston’s most affordable) mixed-use project, CEO Joy Horak-Brown and VP Nicole Cassier tell us. The property will be the first stop on the Harrisburg metro line and will have 175 single room occupancy (SRO) efficiency units, 4k SF of retail and 8k SF of office space. Joy says New Hope particularly wanted to do another project in the East End because of its near-downtown presence with access to job opportunities and need for affordable housing options amidst a fast-growing neighborhood. It worked closely with the neighborhood, which really wanted a mixed-use, transit-oriented development. It’ll be lively and interactive with the community, Joy tells us—neighborhood organizations will be able to use some of the meeting spaces and rooftop garden. The top floor of the property will be the office space, including New Hope’s new corporate office. The retail will not be a chain, Joy and Nicole tell us—they and neighborhood leaders are envisioning something similar to Frank’s Pizza Downtown. The City Housing & Community Development has invested $6.6M into the property, which will be leveraged with tax credit equity and private grants. (The anticipated total development price tag is $25M.) It’s aiming to break ground this winter and deliver mid-2017. Glassman Shoemake Maldonado Architects is handling design. Read more at: https://www.bisnow.com/houston/news/affordable-housing/two-affordable-housing-firsts-for-houston-48564?utm_source=CopyShare&utm_medium=Browser
  21. 200 affordable housing units http://houstontx.gov/housing/FONSI%20Public%20Notice%20Fenix%20Estates.pdf
  22. https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/tomlinson/article/Fighting-gentrification-is-a-losing-battle-get-14066994.php
  23. http://houston.novusagenda.com/agendapublic/CoverSheet.aspx?ItemID=6966&MeetingID=147
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