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Stargaze

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  1. Montrose is the envy of gay men and women in cities where there is no one neighborhood community predominantly identified as gay oriented. There is a strength that comes from not having to run every individual through a social strainer just to find out who is out there with whom we can relate to and interact. The self discovery of an entire community with which we can identify harkens back to the collective coming out of the closet that occurred in our country post-World War II (see the documentary Before Stonewall). Of course self-preservation is important as well. Sometimes it's not just gay people who are aware of a publicly identified gay neighborhood. Unfortunately, it can make one an easier target when gays are not the only individuals who find it easy to find others of the same persuasion. Being targeted is not a new concept and will happen on some levels whether or not there is a gay-identified community. Back in the 50's (again, see the documentary Before Stonewall) small groups would unite to form a type of defense against would be harassers.
  2. I agree. The number of older, established and architecturally notable properties add a richness that's hard to ignore. In the time period during which many of these properties were constructed, I would venture that they may have been considered small mansions. Today's sale prices seems to support that notion to some extent.
  3. An evening out with the gang can sometimes be filled with scandalous drama. It may sound like fiction, but true to the story, it's the basis of eye popping camp and party lore. If you have awoken to find your garter around someone else's leg, only to ask the question - who is this sleeping in my bed, then please Goldilocks, by all means, delight us with some of your best diary snapshots. Think of this little chat as a visit to Carlos, your favorite hair dresser, and you're reliving the unforgettable experience. It's your story, as you remember it.
  4. An evening out with the gang is usually filled with scandalous drama. It may sound like fiction, but true to the story, it's the basis of eye popping camp and party lore. If you have awoken to find your garter around someone else's leg, only to ask the question - who is this sleeping in my bed, then please Goldilocks, by all means, humor us with your best diary snapshots. Was he really a big, bad wolf? Think of this little chat as a visit to Carlos, your favorite hair dresser, and you're reliving the unforgettable experience. Everyone has a story to tell. This is a chance to share yours, as you remember it.
  5. Just depends. Does that come with an egg roll and fortune cookie . . . and then . . . and then . . . and then . . .
  6. How are you defining "East End" in terms of streets bordering it? There are multiple subset areas which collectively comprise the East side. Please describe.
  7. Do you think if you make them feel uncomfortable and out of place that they might take the hint and move on to some place more yuppie-appropriate. Perhaps overwhelm them with more intense servings of the traditional gay Montrose ambiance and fare? They might either move out or become gay yuppies, either of which might not be so bad. Hmmmmm . . . .
  8. That's pretty much the way I remember it too. It's was like the perfect neighborhood not because of any one ingredient, but because it had just the right combination and proportions. Sadly, I think perhaps the adjustments that have been made to the ingredients, their arrangements and combinations may have noticeably altered the end result. I don't know if we'll ever be able to bake that cake again.
  9. I appreciate that description, and you're right, it does pretty much paint a picture of yuppiehood. What things that made the area uniquely Montrose back in the 70's through the 90's do you think are missing now? And what things unique to the area still give it that oh so special gay flavor that can be found nowhere else in the city?
  10. I thought I read somewhere that Pride is now held at nighttime. The elderly and baby strollers come out in noticeable numbers after dark? Not that there's anything wrong with that, it just surprises me a little. And hasn't Pride always been a community event, you know, all inclusive. I was just wondering if the big gay events bring all of the gay family back to these events in the same numbers and intensity as when everyone could afford to live in Montrose. Don't you just hate supply and demand sometimes?
  11. Thanks Plumber2. It's nice to hear about the Montrose 70's experience from the straight perspective. It helps to have a well rounded big picture view. What about those of you who are family (as in gay family). My original question was as follows. A question for anyone on this perspective. As we get ready to begin the 20 teens (as in 2011, 2012. . .), where do we stand in terms of the greater Houston perception of Montrose? Is it still considered a gay mecca by the straight and gay communities (sorry, that's actually two questions in one)? Do you think the community gets props for making it through the 80's, 90's and 2000's? For those gay family members who have spread out to the inner loop, does the community still come together as one for major events like Pride in the same numbers and enthusiasm as when everyone lived as a close knit neighborhood?
  12. It is said that history usually or often repeats itself. For the sake of Numbers and the general flavor of Montrose, I certainly hope so. Those were awesome times in the 80's and beyond: the good, the bad and the uglyall the rest. It was nine kinds of hot, maybe a little like a habanero pepper, o.k. maybe not that hot. But it was great. Wouldn't it be insane if there was really a way to transform the good old days into the great new days? One can only hope and think positive. If you know a couple of endowed investers, that doesn't hurt either. That's what Montrose needs: a gay party infrastructure endowment. Keep your ears to the ground for leads and ideas.
  13. I'm right there with you on being counted rsb320. Without gay singles there would be no gay couples, right? A question for anyone on this perspective. As we get ready to begin the 20 teens (as in 2011, 2012. . .), where do we stand in terms of the greater Houston perception of Montrose? Is it still considered a gay mecca by the straight and gay communities (sorry, that's actually two questions in one)? Do you think the community gets props for making it through the 80's, 90's and 2000's? For those gay family members who have spread out to the inner loop, does the community still come together as one for major events like Pride in the same numbers and enthusiasm as when everyone lived as a close knit neighborhood?
  14. Trends and numbers can be sometimes fairly instructive. Does anyone reading have a handle on the numeric history as far as percentage of Montrose community who are gay for the 70's, 80's, 90's and 2000's? What about absolute and actual numbers. At one point I heard a figure of 250,000 community members who were family. Admittedly, that number was pre-1985. It seems like there are more gay people now than ever. I just don't know if they are starting to gravitate back to the Montrose area, or if the Houston gay population is still pushing towards blending throughout the city.
  15. Thanks for that response. Austin is similar - the generalization in Austin is often found on bumper stickers and t-shirts: "Keep Austin Weird." The interest in maintaining the weirdness and funkiness barometer tend to create an overall gay friendly atmosphere. What about your perspective on the other part of my question relating the treatment of older gays in Montrose by the younger? Any thoughts there?
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