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57Tbird

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Posts posted by 57Tbird

  1. And you should NOT under any circumstances read the trash version of the story written by John Hill's second wife Ann Kurth Hill. Murder in Texas is the book that became the TV movie, and it's mostly cheap and tawdry fiction. That's why Hollywood TV moguls just fell all over themselves turning it into a a prime time movie.

     

    The late and lamented Thomas "Tommy" Thompson was a very good and prolific Houston newspaper reporter who poured his journalistic talents into writing very erudite and readable non-fiction true-crime stories. Blood and Money is his best, and it is the best and most accurate telling of this crazy and sordid story. Sadly, Thompson left us far too soon. He died of a liver infection in 1982, just weeks after his 49th birthday.

     

    I took our our copy of Blood and Money off the bookshelf and found that that it was published in 1976, the first year it came out.  It is well worn from being passed around to friends and relatves.  That speaks for its popularity.  My wife commented that she went to high school (San Jacinto) with Thompson's wife, Joyce.

     

  2. T Bird, was the Mobile station across the street from the Retting's ice cream parlor on the corner of Main and Elgin?

     

    Yes.  It was across Elgin on the NE corner of Main and Elgin.  It faced toward Main.  There was a D'Arcy's on the SW corner and a Gulf station, I think it was, on the NW Corner.  I lived between that Mobil station and another big, old house that was on the NW corner of Fannin and Elgin.

     

  3. There was a Rettig's ice cream parlor on the southeast corner of Main and Elgin in the early-mid 40's.  I lived across the street from it on Elgin in that time-frame.  It had a soda fountain, tables, and booths.  A single dip cone was 5 cents, a double dip was 10 cents.  A banana split was 35 cents.  You could get a pint of factory-packed ice cream for 25 cents.  Hand-packed would set you back 35 cents.  Unbeknownst to my parents, I would sometimes spend my weekly 25 cent allowance on a pint, sneak it back to my hiding place under the house and consume the entire pint.

     

     

    I came across a picture at http://www.sloanegallery.com/ of the Rettig's that I mentioned in my earlier post above.  I lived next to the Mobilgas station, whose sign you see in the background,

     

    post-873-0-47669800-1394293742_thumb.jpg

     

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  4. Yep - here are a few things I've gathered:

     

    http://arch-ive.org/archive/rettigs-ice-cream/

     

    There was a Rettig's ice cream parlor on the southeast corner of Main and Elgin in the early-mid 40's.  I lived across the street from it on Elgin in that time-frame.  It had a soda fountain, tables, and booths.  A single dip cone was 5 cents, a double dip was 10 cents.  A banana split was 35 cents.  You could get a pint of factory-packed ice cream for 25 cents.  Hand-packed would set you back 35 cents.  Unbeknownst to my parents, I would sometimes spend my weekly 25 cent allowance on a pint, sneak it back to my hiding place under the house and consume the entire pint.

     

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  5. It's been awhile since I've vistied the forum and this topic caught my eye for a reply.  My first car was a '51 Chevy that I bought in 1953, using as a down payment, money I had saved from summer jobs at City National Bank and Great Southern Life Insurance.  My dad financed the remainder for me.  Being a "cool" teenager at the time, I had to get dual exhausts on it, along with blue dot taillights, chrome wheel rim covers, half-moon chrome headlight covers, and whitewall tires,  I have attached a picture of it. My next car was a '56 Ford Victoria hardtop, purchased used, in late 1956.  It was turquoise and white.  I have no picture of it.

    A brief story here of the one I'm most proud of.  In 1999, I was diagnosed with cancer.  I had surgery, but didn't know at the time how much time I had left.  On my bucket list was a car that I had drooled over in the mid-50's....  the Ford Thunderbirds.  So I set out to find a fully restored one, since I didn't want to waste what time I might have left restoring one.  My wife and I drove all over Texas looking for one.  I finally found a beauty.  I drove it everywhere and really enjoyed the looks and nice comments I received about it.  After several years, my cancer was in total remission.  I am a tall person, and my T'bird was getting harder to get under and to the places I needed to get to to keep it in tip-top shape.  It was also not real comfortable to drive.  It was definitely not made for someone well over six feet tall.  It was also becoming expensive and hard to find replacement parts for it, so I decided to sell it.  No problem finding a buyer.

    Now you know what's behind my forum name.  I have attached a picture of it also.

     

    post-873-0-74007600-1393260670_thumb.jpg    post-873-0-40644900-1393260703_thumb.jpg

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  6. The Teen Hall I remember was on Grand Blvd, several blocks north of Holcombe behind the old Sacred Heart Academy on Holcombe.  My buddies and I went there in the late 50s to see and enjoy my favorite KILT and KNUZ deejays spinning records for the Friday and Saturday night "hops". 

     

    Filio...  My wife lived just off Grand Blvd, between Holcombe and Dixie Dr, in the early-mid 50's when we were dating.  She does not remember a "Teen Hall" in the area at that time.  What we both remember is a private club on Grand Blvd, between Dixie Dr and MacGregor.  If I remember correctly, it was known as the Como Club, or something like that.  It had a swimming pool behind the building.  It may be the same facility that you mention and later became the Teen Hall that you remember from the late 50's.  I guess Paul Berlin (KNUZ) was one of the deejays you saw there.

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  7. I have a few pictures from several years ago, but isn't this the Delman terrazzo?

     

    Looks like it. Here's another picture from the late 30's.  You can see some of it here.  I lived about 5 blocks from the Delman when I was a kid in the mid-40's.  I walked to the kid shows there on Saturday mornings.  I sure don't remember it being that close to Richmond, as shown in the Google Maps shot.  I remember a Walgreens, I think it was, and maybe another place between the Delman location and Richmond.  I think Richmond was only two lanes then. Maybe it was widened toward the Delman location.
     
    post-873-0-56422100-1374519865_thumb.jpg
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  8. Understand this is an old post, but a recent discovery by myself...

    The original Camp Sterling was at Houston Point.   This was destroyed by hurricane Carla in '60/'61 (?)Camp facilities were then moved (NE) up to the Methodist campground.  This was the original Sterling homesite.  Gov. Sterling had built a replica of Mt. Vernon which was there when I attended the Indian Guide camp.  Remnants of the long fishing pier can still be seen on satelite photo.   The Mt. Vernon mansion was demolished some years back, but the foundation can also be seen in satelite photo.    A new home has been built on this site.   I have not been able to locate a photograph of the old mansion.  

     

    Here is some info on the Sterling mansion and camp from the Sloane Gallery website.  It says it was patterned after the White House.

  9. I don't know when 7-Eleven left the area the first time, but it's coming back in Waco, and in Temple, there's an intersection with two 7-Elevens directly across the street (a small street, not a highway) from each other. One used to be a Mobil as of May 2011, apparently.

     

    Went that way recently in Temple and snapped pictures of those two across the street from each other.  The one on the bottom was previously a Mobil station, as mentioned.

    post-873-0-59127300-1361046145.jpgpost-873-0-37196600-1361046168.jpg

  10. Reading FilioScotia's post about the bowling alley on N. Shepherd reminds me of the people who, I believe, owned that alley. They were Don Ellis and Pete Treybig if I'm not mistaken. They also owned the Tropicana on Lawndale. Both men are members of the Texas Bowling Hall of Fame.

    I can still remember watching Mr. Ellis practicing during slow times at the bowling alley on Lawdale, rolling strike after strike. When he didn't throw a strike, he just reset the pins.

    My wife knows Don Ellis's wife, so I contacted her about your comments. She replied as shown below...

    The name of the bowling center on North Shepherd was Merchants Park . They bought it in 1968, bought the Palace in 1973, built another one named Diamond on the far North, on 1960, in 1977 and another one named Emerald in 1978. In 1983, they built another one named Copperfield on the west side. He had two partners, Pete Treybig and Bill Lillard. Don and Bill are in the National Hall of Fame, State and Local. Pete is in the State and Local.

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  11. You're probably right on the genealogy research time-frame. If you can access the Ancestry.com website, their 1940 census application is much faster than the government website I noted. You can pick a certain page, if desired, without having to leaf through the whole document to get to it.

  12. After 72 years, the 1940 census records are now available.You can look into it at this website. It doesn't have name listings for location purposes, but if you know the address or area (maps are available), you can find the enumeration district (ED) and look through all the images to find your address with its inhabitants' names listed. It's very interesting and extremely handy for anyone doing genealogical research. And it's free.

  13. Here are a couple of Woolworth pictures from the Bailey collection...

    1939

    Woolworth-1939.jpg

    1951

    Woolworth-1951.jpg

    Here's a menu from the lunch counter/soda fountain. I don't have a date, but I would guess about early 50's.

    WoolworthMenu.jpg

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  14. Playland Baby,

    There was a poster here several years ago by the name of Sparky, who lived at Playland in the 50's. Here is a link to the start of her posts in Old Houston Amusement Parks...

    You can look through a lot more of her posts in that time-frame and pick up some interesting memorabilia from her recollections of Playland and the Playland surroundings in that era.

  15. Hi Tbird! I jumped over to the racing forum and found Clyde's name mentioned by Midget85. In his post he refered to pickup truck races at Playland. Hum. I don't recall those at all. Can you expand on that or direct us to more details? Thx

    I don't remember seeing any pick-up races there in the mid-50's. Just about everything else though... Powder-puffs, figure 8's, demolitions, and the regular stock and modifieds.

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