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TheNiche

Castaway
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Everything posted by TheNiche

  1. Over my head, to be honest. I'm only vaguely aware that Kevin Bacon is a celebrity, and I'm pretty sure that he's an actor, but all I ever can think of when I see his name is bacon. His name is very distracting from anything of relevance that might involve him.
  2. I'm not kidding. That's how it worked out, and none of the three of us are totally irredeemable 'Connection' whores. Small world.
  3. No dude, it's my fault. You and he are both connections of mine, so there are only two degrees of separation.
  4. Having done financial modeling for a living at one point in my life, I'll chime in briefly. A developer's model backs into the highest dollar amount that they're willing to pay for the land. If a developer decides to take a haircut on a development in order to provide a public good, then they won't be able to pay as much for the land. They'd get outbid by a profit-maximizing developer. Also, people that specialize in multifamily typically are hesitant to venture into retail. Its a totally different business model with its own market dynamics and cost structure. If the retail rents that
  5. [/exile] Structures built from concrete and masonry in accordance with International Building Codes that are enforced in developed countries by governments that aren't rife with corruption are vastly preferable to wood frame structures that are built under the same set of assumptions. (Yet wood frame structures are generally favored in the United States because they are more cost effective, more forgiving, and less labor-intensive in a country where labor is expensive and cumbersome. An American developer intending to turn a profit should only build with concrete when they are deprived of ev
  6. I live nowhere and I live everywhere. I've wandered off the reservation and onto another planet that bares no resemblance to your own. It's great.
  7. I still read some HAIF threads and browse Swamplot, but I'm finding the issues that I once expounded on to be distant and petty. (Who really gives a crap about METRO or a new highrise? It just seems like people that lead fairly boring lives have a need to invent drama for themselves, a reason to squabble, a reason to complain, a reason to feel self-important. (It's not lost on me that my own comment, which points that out, is cut from the same cloth.) Every now and then, I'll spot some otherwise reasonable person saying something that's really quite dumb. Where I'd have pounced on it befor
  8. All reason is aesthetic when you get right down to it. And there is your answer.
  9. This is pretty much accurate. The search for meaning is a collaborative effort (and always petty). It is the development of language that allows one to infer and carefully sculpt a formal system of logic, and then also for zany barely-plausible abstractions. It doesn't have to be that way. However, the most extreme documented instances of neglected children seem to indicate to me that without an opportunity to develop that system of language and logic among humans; a child might go through the same process among a pack of dogs and howl at the moon, but does not thereby seem well-equipped t
  10. Why should we let that stop us? Mine is chiefly a crisis of internal coherency. Drawing others in only exploits a kind of chaotic order, a formal logic with which to communicate universal senselessness.
  11. If ever my views should fall within the spectrum of common sense, then they would not be worth expressing. In this matter,my conflicting sense of humanism and nihilism are in agreement. The climate is changing due to humanity's economic development. Productive capacity (and the political stability afforded by globalism) will prepare humans to adapt successfully. But then the nihilist in me says that they'll adapt or die, just like any species, that it really doesn't matter which, and that preserving the tradition of the living is absurd because there is also a tradition of dying, and of ext
  12. Nah, I don't really care about climate change. Warmer weather typically aids in building up species diversity, but it's the pattern of rainfall that is the real kicker. Some regions win and some regions lose. Whatever the anthropogenic contribution to climate change, the climate has been changing in absolute terms since the beginning of geologic history. Sometimes it is warmer, sometimes it is cooler, sometimes Texas is under water. That is our geologic heritage, which begat our economic heritage and the climate change that you seem to abhor. Concern over it just seems so senseless in th
  13. Is it that you are less adaptable, or perhaps society has adapted to your ilk? I was born at the brink of the "Stalinization" of Texas. I think that the manifest insanity of the oil boom and the looming reality of an oil bust began to set in by about 1981 or 1982. You can hear it in ZZ Top records if you listen to them in a chronological sequence. And then, with the S&L bust, the hard money was gone and the soft money--the "American Dream" money--took hold. The people shall never again be free, not from the banks, and not from themselves. It is their desires, their greed, and a mechan
  14. I know. I'll come back eventually, but only when I am content to be docile. America is a good place to be docile. It'll be a while, I think.
  15. I should add for the sake of honest and because I don't have any particular need to care: If physical anthropology taught me one thing worth knowing, it was that my Texan ancestors sought out the 'strange', resulting in some unofficial bloodlines. (You can tell from the shape of one's teeth.) The fruit doesn't fall far from the tree.
  16. I find your conclusion as to the motivations underlying Texas emigration to be of personal interest: "because they couldn't get along back east." Sure. That's the boiled down essence of why I've impulsively left Houston for a sometimes lawless post-Communistic third world nation, without business prospects, unable to speak the language or drink the water (which is okay, it turns out, because beer is cheap). Proximity was not a consideration for me, however. Proximity is simultaneously an amenity and a curse; Texans have always had to weigh town and country, one against the other, within the
  17. Well okay, one more hint. I just rode a motorcycle onto the public sidewalk in front of a major local landmark, then plunged headlong into oncoming traffic for a blocklength, and nobody gave a damn. It was more efficient that way. Americans really are a bunch of ninnies. We're the Brits of the 21st century. Just figured that I'd throw that out there to inform the next round of debates where aggressive cyclists are concerned.
  18. No hints, except that I leave in three hours. Bye.
  19. Precisely, and your comments did not address that. Your propaganda is part of a pattern, a sort of pathological light rail apologism in even the most loosely-related of threads.
  20. I wish that next to the "Like This" button was an "Off-Topic Propaganda" button.
  21. That's nice to think about, but a de-tenanting, gutting, remodeling, and/or re-skinning, and eventually re-tenanting of the Exxon Building will still only replace a Class A office tenant with a Class A office tenant (or tenants). Its not as though the building is painful to look at; it's just isolated is all, and seems out of place. SkyHouse is going to look sorta out of place, too. But all I see that really will add to this part of downtown is a few hundred extra residents. That's all. That is not a catalyst.
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