Diaspora

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About Diaspora

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  1. More coming to Midtown!

    Yup, the 3101 San Jacinto location has been, in the past, Club Empire and Club Myst, with dreadful results for nearby residents including a driveby in which 6 people were shot in May of 2015, when it was billed as Club Empire. The nearby residents and businesses protested the TABC license in 2016 and the place shut down soon after.
  2. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    4 by my count, at this juncture.
  3. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    Thanks. Fascinating to think that 2015 was “crazy busy” and Midtown is now tapering off while we have two 30 story apartment buildings on the rise, Camden at McGowen coming on line, the Windsor finished, etc.
  4. Austin & LaBranch @ Gray

  5. Austin & LaBranch @ Gray

    Steinberg Dickey Collaborative have the proposed exterior design of the building on their website.
  6. The Kirby Mansion: 15-Story High-Rise @Brazos/Gray

    Anybody have a profile of Ricardo Weitz and Central Houston Cadillac?
  7. The Kirby Mansion: 15-Story High-Rise @Brazos/Gray

    The buyer doesn't want the building on the block, so it either moves or comes down. Or another buyer emerges.
  8. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    Then we'll just disagree. The backbone of successfully engaging with the issue of homelessness has proven to be a housing first style treatment of providing shelter without condition, that is a shelter that is "low-barrier". Contrary to your assessment of "dumping" the "least desirable" this entails coordinated entry and assessment of the residents, counseling and substance management with an eye toward permanent housing resources. After all, the policy is to end homelessness not end substance abuse, so start there and work with persons issues after they have shelter. And just so you're clear on the "dumping" issue, I have no objection to creating such a shelter in Midtown, this one happens to be apparently in your neck of the woods, however.
  9. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    My “apparent glee” in finding a housing option for the homeless willing to take up residence at 419 Emancipation? Get some perspective.
  10. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    I will also note that Midtown has been working with the COH's Homeless Initiative to find housing for the homeless who want off the street. Until very recently we were anticipating a low level housing opportunity at 419 Emancipation, but the owner of that building decided, instead, to sign on with Southwest Key to house children taken from their parents at the border. http://www.costar.com/News/Article/Houston-Mayor-Asks-Building-Owner-to-Reconsider-Lease-for-Undocumented-Child-Detention-Facility/202078
  11. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    We'll have to wait and see then. My conversations with decision-makers on this issue lead me suggest the station will soon be transitioned out of Midtown. I say all of this with the further conviction that the station is a symptom rather than source of the issues it has come to symbolize.
  12. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    https://midtownhouston.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/MRA-Minutes-03.29.18.pdf
  13. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    We should expect to know by third quarter this year.
  14. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    No, I'm not advocating for forced ground floor retail. I'm more about having an extended conversation with developers to see if mixed use (or some activated ground floor presence) can maximize their investment. What I am finding is that developers unfamiliar with Midtown (Caydon may be the exception) arrive with preconceived notions of what will maximize their investment predicated on stale and fixed views of a built structure that has worked for them in another setting. There are means of incentivizing mixed use, as with the incoming Whole Foods on Elgin. There are other developers, like CVS and Walgreens, who see no other means of building than what they have successfully dropped into different settings.
  15. Block 436 & 437 (Formerly Milhaus Midtown)

    Can't really speak to the 20 year history of seeking to relocate the Greyhound station. What I can speak to is the fact that a joint plan between the Midtown TIRZ and the COH was funded in March, with the blessing of Greyhound, to relocate the station.