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Skyboxdweller

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  1. Seems like a good match between use and location. It's not an A plus location that merits a five star hotel or luxury condo building. I'd rather have the tax revenue flowing from a vacant site than having it sit there empty for decades, as many other parcels in this city do.
  2. I think it is still too soon to understand the impact of the pandemic on retail/consumer activity and foot traffic at retail locations. At super high priced luxury malls, smaller boutiques and stores not supported by global giants don't have the resources to stick it out and make mid-course changes. ROD doesn't draw on the presence of office workers to the extent that downtown locations do in America's cities. But what we see in places like NY and Chi is that without a steady influx of suburban office workers into downtowns on a five day a week basis , the retail and restaurants in the area aren't going to make their numbers to support their pre-pandemic rents.
  3. The work to integrate the the new land bridge elements with the existing landscape continues. 6A8F7264-8038-4D21-B5CF-B1ABAFCA71D1_1_201_a.heic 472F76E7-7440-4536-8C61-74539DA67F22_1_201_a.heic 2D645A83-3B04-44D8-8ECC-7B482ABBB821_1_201_a.heic AECF87E9-3D4D-44EA-B520-2933A25002CB_1_201_a.heic
  4. re sugarfactoryexpress: A menu only a profit-oriented cardiac surgeon could love.
  5. It's not showing in the aerial photo but the lot where La Peep used to be located is also vacant and should be considered part of this same development.
  6. I misspoke. The government taken as a whole, including the Army Corps of Engineers, our Congressional representatives, our state legislature, county and city government has failed to address the problem. It's a fools errand to point fingers at any one group, because floods control affects allocation of Federal resource and the Army Corps expertise and operational control , buckets of funding allocated to the state by the Feds and direct state revenue, and the resources available to the counties , especially their land use planning and building code divisions, the flood control districts, and the city operations and funding that is available as well. It wouldn't have taken any extraordinary funding for the county to clearly indicate in the land records that certain property was within the limits of the reservoir and subject to flooding, or for the county board to amend the land use regulations to make such land unsuitable for development. But I could only assume that cash passed in the form of legal political contributions from the land developers to the elected officials to look the other way when the land became ripe for development. . This region has been governed by the ethos of uncontrolled development, build em and sell em fast and cheap and move on, and didn't hold free riders accountable for the risks they passed on to others downstream. If you look at recent aerial photos of development in Waller County just past Katy, the development process continues unabated and thousands of homes and supporting businesses will be built on the prairie in the next ten years, precluding any coordinated effort to allow it to exist as a retention and detention zone for the urban agglomeration to the east.
  7. Re Katy Freeway tunnel : NYC gets 90% of its water from a reservoir system fed by a watershed of approx 2000 sq miles that sits on the western side of the Hudson River. The water travels under the river through tunnels and then proceeds to a series of processing plants and reservoirs into the five boroughs. The water is not pumped and is totally powered by gravity. By the time it reaches Manhattan there is still enough head on the flow to let it rise to the level of a six story building without additional pumping. So yes, a tunnel system from West Houston to an outlet in Galveston Bay could use a siphon to power the flow and would not need the help of mechanical pumps. The sad thing about Houston's management of this problem is that didn't act to buy additional land to extend the public owned land within these reservoirs to the fill line and allowed private residential development to exist within the basins; didn't start the tunnel project while it was rebuilding the Katy Freeway and use the reconstruction to deal with more than moving cars from Katy to downtown and back; and it still is woefully behind in agreeing upon and designing major flood control projects and the risk of flooding will remain for at least a decade or more.,
  8. The corner site with the pseudo-Mansard would be a great location for an Eatally. Roof garden bar restaurant. Grab and go on the first floor, stack a couple of parking levels and a few more food display court levels and bring the building out to the sidewalk.
  9. It will be great to have the west side of the boulevard fill in if and when this site and the Apache site get developed. The only other major parcel will be the 2 story apartment complex next to Uptown Park that was a condominium bought out by a developer a few economic cycles ago. The building the corner of Westheimer and Post Oak could you a redo. It's odd that the east side is still a hodge lodge of an empty lot, strip malls, small retail and a few high rises , while the west side has been pretty much redeveloped.
  10. There are several in Banff National Park in Canada as well. And Olmstead and Vaux did something similar with the Central Park cross town roads and in the weaving of pedestrian , horse and vehicle trails elsewhere.
  11. You've got to be kidding. This is one of the most visible and potentially vibrant corners of central Houston and they came up with a design that belongs as an addition to Co-op City in the Bronx.
  12. I took a walk in the park on Sunday at dusk. The walls of the outdoor rooms had gone to seed and berry. The swamp was moist. The families sitting on blankets and individuals walking the planks seems at peace. To the landscape architects who repurposed and replanted for the public's use and enjoyment , kudos. 22CC5225-0DE3-4FE9-A4A6-10A3482F287E_1_201_a.heic 59F3820E-42EF-4F16-9B86-5D36AF86541E_1_201_a.heic DB93A080-B325-4B7B-B626-464257C5DD7E.heic 8FA25F4F-EBF3-4B1A-B641-E9C38B62FEF0.heic DE267947-2936-4602-8736-6C0EE62D6DAD.heic ACE556CD-4392-4A31-9F21-197952539397.heic
  13. I'm no expert, but it looks like the parapets and screens on the roof are done. Maybe some lighting? The only part that looks crappy from my 37th floor perch is near the San Felipe side of the tower where there is exposed sheet metal ductwork. I'm probably only one of a handful of people who can see it. It's not going to be visible from the ground or from miles away.
  14. I'm staring straight across from the fins as I type. What you see is what you get. It looks like the punched metal screening material that accents the fins has been installed. They have some scaffolding around this assembly now.
  15. I watched them do this when they started work on the foundation of the Aspire residential tower. They "dewatered" the perimeter of the building site and drove metal pilings to create a relatively dry bathtub-like space two stories below the surface before laying down a massive amount steel and concrete.
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